Policy Forum

Nautilus Institute’s Policy Forum‘s focus is on the timely publication of expert analysis and op-ed style pieces on the foremost of security-related issues to Northeast Asia. Its mission is to facilitate a multilateral flow of information among an international network of policy-makers, analysts, scholars, media, and readers. Policy Forum essays are typically from a wide range of expertise, political orientations, as well as geographic regions and seeks to present readers with opinions and analysis by experts on the issues as well as alternative voices not typically presented or heard. Feedback, comments, responses from Policy Forum readers are highly encouraged.

NAPSNet, Policy Forum

U.S-Japan Core Issues

Sheila Smith writes: “The proposal for A New Approach to Security in Northeast Asia: Breaking the Gridlock offers a fresh perspective on the diplomatic framework for negotiating peace and stability for Northeast Asia. This memo responds to this initiative from the perspective of Japanese security and the shared strategic goals of the U.S.-Japan alliance.”

Sheila A. Smith is a Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

This report was originally presented at the New Approach to Security in Northeast Asia: Breaking the Gridlock workshop held on October 9th and 10th, 2012 in Washington, DC.

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Learning Organisation Paradigm and Climate Adaptation

Saleem Janjua writes that “Adaptation to climate change is increasingly becoming a policy priority for government and private sector organizations across the globe, partly driven by a rationale that successful adaptation will reduce the consequences of climatic impacts that are unavoidable….However, grasping such an opportunity through policy intervention is a major challenge, particularly in the urban sector in developing countries.”

Saleem Janjua is the Climate Change Adaptation contributor for the NAPSNet Weekly report.

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Replacing the Armistice With A Peace Treaty in Korea

Leon V. Sigal: “Whether a peace treaty precedes or follows denuclearization, it is inconceivable that Pyongyang would curb its nuclear and missile programs, never mind give up its nuclear arms and missiles, without a peace process. As long as the United States and South Korea remain its foes, it will feel threatened and want a stronger “deterrent” to counter that threat.”

Leon V. Sigal is director of the Northeast Asia Cooperative Security Project at the Social Science Research Council in New York.

This report was originally presented at the New Approach to Security in Northeast Asia: Breaking the Gridlock workshop held on October 9th and 10th, 2012 in Washington, DC.

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Tactically Smart, Strategically Stupid: Simulated B52 Nuclear Bombings in Korea

Peter Hayes states, “Deploying nuclear capable bombers accompanied by nuclear threat rhetoric will not quell regressive proliferation sentiment in Seoul. Nor will it persuade North Korea’s leaders to desist from nuclear aggression…..quiet actions will always speak louder in Pyongyang than aggressive words.”

Peter Hayes is the Director of the Nautilus Institute and the Deterrence contributor to the NAPSNet Weekly report.

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Canada and the Halperin Plan: Temper Expectations

Paul Evans states, “the perverse challenge is that while specific agreements may be possible, a Northeast Asian regional security framework is as far away as ever. In terms of regional architecture, a more muscular ARF of the future on non-traditional security threats and an overarching East Asia Summit process may be the best mid-term bets.”

This report was originally presented at the New Approach to Security in Northeast Asia: Breaking the Gridlock workshop held on October 9th and 10th, 2012 in Washington, DC.

Paul Evans is a Professor at the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia.

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Sustainable discussions

Roger Cavazos: “A war on the Korean Peninsula, even a limited one, would be an ecological disaster. Even an uneasy peace has taken an environmental toll. Discussing environmental topics is a low cost way to sow seeds for discussions between the parties on and around the Korean Peninsula. The fruits of those discussions are likely sustainable.”

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Shaping the Strategic Environment Not Bad Behaviors

Peter Hayes: “At the Asan Institute Nuclear Forum 2013, I argued that US vital interests in the region mostly don’t revolve around the DPRK. Therefore, the US should establish a framework that addresses primarily the nuclear insecurities of the five parties, not the DPRK, as the first priority.”

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A Northeast Asian TAC?

Donald Emmerson explores how the Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia could provide a useful model for a comprehensive agreement on peace and security in Northeast Asia. Although unlikely in the short term in Emmerson’s view, he also explores the means by which such a treaty might be established.

This report was originally presented at the New Approach to Security in Northeast Asia: Breaking the Gridlock workshop held on October 9th and 10th, 2012 in Washington, DC.

Donald Emmerson is the Director of the Southeast Asia Forum (SEAF); Affiliated Faculty, CDDRL; Affiliated Scholar, Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies; and Senior Fellow Emeritus, FSI at Stanford University.

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Money doesn’t grow on trees

Money doesn’t grow on trees

by Nikhil Desai – Energy Security Contributor
Rich countries see a macro-economic paradox of near-free debt and slow growth, in…

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China 1, Japan 0. Allies beware

China 1, Japan 0. Allies beware

by Richard Tanter – Austral Peace and Security Contributor
Japan has a talent for border disputes: it has one with all of its neighbours: the Senkakus…

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