Policy Forum

Nautilus Institute’s Policy Forum‘s focus is on the timely publication of expert analysis and op-ed style pieces on the foremost of security-related issues to Northeast Asia. Its mission is to facilitate a multilateral flow of information among an international network of policy-makers, analysts, scholars, media, and readers. Policy Forum essays are typically from a wide range of expertise, political orientations, as well as geographic regions and seeks to present readers with opinions and analysis by experts on the issues as well as alternative voices not typically presented or heard. Feedback, comments, responses from Policy Forum readers are highly encouraged.

NAPSNet, Policy Forum

Policy Forum 09-075: A Smart Alliance in the Age of Complexity; ROK-U.S. Alliance in the 21st Century

Seongho Sheen, assistant professor at the Graduate School of International Studies at Seoul National University and member of Policy Advisory Board of the ROK Ministry of Defense, writes, “It is clear that the two allies need each other to face both old and new challenges. The alliance needs change to deal with those challenges more effectively. A smart alliance combining a hard and soft approach will provide answers for one of South Korea’s ‘closest friends and greatest allies’ of the twenty-first century.”

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Policy Forum 09-074: Hatoyama Government and Japan’s Defense Guidelines: Pause or End to Alliance Deepening?

Sourabh Gupta, Senior Research Associate at Samuels International Associates, Inc., writes, “the Hatoyama government issued Defense Guidelines could potentially facilitate the SDF’s deployment in threat-based instances, both in rear area military support mode and pre-and-post-conflict ‘policing’ mode collective security operations – subject to the minimum condition that such deployment be covered by an explicit U.N. Chapter VII mandate. And by the same token, military or policing activities beyond individual self-defense ceilings that are seen to be loosely authorized, either of its own accord or at the initiative of the U.S. and select allies, will not be entertained – short of Japan suffering a direct armed attack.”

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Policy Forum 09-073: Japan between Alliance and Community

Yul Sohn, Professor of International Studies at Yonsei University, writes, “a traditional military alliance is necessary yet insufficient to deal with Japan’s new strategic dilemmas… Japanese leaders should recognize that what is needed is not tightening up but transforming the alliance structure into a complex one.”

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Policy Forum 09-070: Civil Society Reaction to the “Green Dam” Internet Filter Software

Jia Xijin, Associate Professor at the NGO Research Center at Tsinghua University, writes, “because of the importance of freedom of expression and the value of information to promote social justice the government should control and supervise the internet very cautiously. That’s why people are concerned about Green Dam. Qin suggests that, except for illegal information which is banned by law enacted through due process and authority, adult citizens should asses the harmfulness of information, not the government.”

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Policy Forum 09-069: The Way to Denuclearize North Korea

Wooksik Cheong, Representative of the Civil Network for a Peaceful Korea, writes, “If North Korea denuclearized it would lose its leverage to compel the US to fulfill the agreement. This is a fundamental asymmetry in the US-North Korea relationship. Once North Korea denuclearizes itself, the process will be very difficult to reverse. However, for the US, it is easy to change its policy toward a denuclearized North Korea.”

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Policy Forum 09-068: Understanding New Opportunities to Enhance Human Security in the DPRK

John S. Park, Senior Research Associate and Director of Northeast Asia projects at the U.S. Institute of Peace’s Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention and an Associate with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Managing the Atom Project, writes, “NGOs and government organizations seeking to achieve economic development goals can work closely with Chinese merchants to leverage routes and mechanisms to increase the flow of goods across HamJi. In doing so, these various players can substantially help improve human security in a key part of North Korea.”

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Policy Forum 09-067: No Rush to Talk With North Korea

Andrei Lankov, Associate Professor at Kookmin University, writes, “Perhaps the most important reason why Pyongyang should be engaged is the long-term domestic impact of talks. Negotiations and aid create an environment where contacts between the isolated population and the outside world steadily increase, exposing the total lie in which North Koreans have to live. In the long run, this will undermine the regime, bringing the country’s radical transformation – and, probably, a solution of the nuclear issue.”

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Policy Forum 09-066: Extended Deterrence: Cutting Edge of the Debate on Nuclear Policy

Barry M. Blechman, co-founder of the Henry L. Stimson Center and a Stimson Distinguished Fellow, writes, “the contrast between murmurings of defense officials in private meetings and their horror at the thought of public debate about nuclear deployments makes clear that extended deterrence is a concept that served a vital purpose during the Cold War, but whose time has come – and gone.”

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Policy Forum 09-065: The Significance of Clinton’s Visit to North Korea

Tong Kim, Adjunct professor at Johns Hopkins University SAIS and a visiting professor at the University of North Korean Studies, writes, “it is high time that both Washington and Pyongyang take a fresh look at where they are and to get out of the box in search for a bold pragmatic path toward a win-win resolution of the half century old U.S.-North Korea hostile relationship. North Korea can survive without nuclear weapons and the United States can undertake negotiations before the North gives up its nuclear programs. The Clinton trip offers both sides a fresh opportunity to make the first positive move.”

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Policy Forum 09-064: Clinton’s Mission to Pyongyang

John Delury, Associate Director of the Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations and director of the North Korea Inside Out Task Force, writes, “the symbolism around Mr. Clinton’s visit, and his direct talks with Kim Jong Il, suggests we may be on the cusp of some positive movement, at last. With wise, creative and determined follow-through, hopefully Pyongyang and Washington can make some verifiable and irreversible (if not complete) improvement in normalizing their relationship.”

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