Daily Report Archives

Daily Report Archives

Established in December 1993, the Nautilus Institute’s *N*ortheast *A*sia *P*eace and *S*ecurity *N*etwork (NAPSNet) Daily Report served thousands of readers  in more than forty countries, including policy makers, diplomats, aid organizations, scholars, donors, activists, students, and journalists.

The NAPSNet Daily Report aimed to serve a community of practitioners engaged in solving the complex security and sustainability issues in the region, especially those posed by the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program and the threat of nuclear war in the region.  It was distributed by email rom 1993-1997, and went on-line in December 1997, which is when the archive on this site begins. The format at that time can be seen here.

However, for multiple reasons—the rise of instantaneous news services, the evolution of the North Korea and nuclear issues, the increasing demand for specialized and synthetic analysis of these and related issues, and the decline in donor support for NAPSNet—the Institute stopped producing the Daily Report news summary service as of December 17, 2010.

NAPSNet

NAPSNet Daily Report 04 February, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. Four-Party Peace Talks Briefing Postponement

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPARTMENT NOON BRIEFING, FEB. 3,” USIA Transcript, 2/4/97) confirmed that the joint US/ROK briefing on the four-party peace talks proposal will not take place as scheduled on February 5 in New York, because the DPRK wants first to complete a grain purchase deal with a private US company. Burns said: “The North Koreans have told us once again that they need to give, as they say, first priority to their business discussions with Cargill and others for the procurement of grain. So therefore it is uncertain when this joint briefing will be rescheduled. I think having postponed it once and set a date, I don’t think we’re in a position where we want to set a date again. The North Koreans believe they need to go through their grain discussions. We hope that when those grain discussions are concluded or perhaps even before that they might decide to have this briefing.” Burns said he did not know if the DPRK asked the US to underwrite the grain deal, but added that the US “believes that these are private grain discussions” in which the only US involvement is to issue the export license. Burns also said that if the UN World Food Program issues an emergency appeal for food aid to the DPRK, the US “will treat that as a very serious issue. As you know, the United States has responded to these appeals in the past.”

The Washington Post (Kevin Sullivan, “PLEA FOLLOWS E

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NAPSNet Daily Report 03 February, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Announcements

I. United States

1. DPRK Food Crisis

Reuters (“N.KOREA SAYS GRAIN STOCKS FALL SHORT,” Tokyo, 2/3/97) and the Associated Press (“NORTH KOREA APPEALS FOR AID,” Seoul, 2/3/97) reported that the DPRK’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said Monday it had only half the grain needed to feed its people, and appealed for international food donations. “As is known to all, North Korea has in recent years been repeatedly hit by unprecedented natural disasters, which greatly damaged agriculture and other sectors of the national economy and caused temporary food problems,” KCNA said. “The nation’s annual demand for grain is about 7.84 million tons, of which 4.82 million tons is needed as food,” it said, adding that last year’s flood-damaged grain output was only 2.5 million tons, “the amount being far less than expected.” The shortfall of 2.3 million tons is the same amount estimated by the UN World Food Program, which is preparing to issue another appeal — the third since last year — for large-scale food aid to the DPRK. The KCNA plea followed a statement last week by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies that food rations in the DPRK had dropped to a level four times lower than normally considered essential for a healthy population. The KCNA report thanked the international community, including the US, for past food assistance. “We are really grateful for this,” KCNA said. However, the announcement, an unusually frank and detailed description of

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Innovative Approaches to Financing Environmentally Sustainable Energy Development in Northeast Asia

Innovative Approaches to Financing Environmentally Sustainable Energy Development in Northeast Asia by: Dr. Hossein Razavi January 1997 * DRAFT * PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE WITHOUT PERMISSION * DRAFT *Copyright (c) 1997 Nautilus of America/The Nautilus InstituteFunding for this paper provided by The W. Alton Jones Foundation, The U.S.-Japan Foundation and The Center for […]

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NAPSNet Daily Report 31 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Japan

I. United States

1. US-DPRK Liaison Office

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPARTMENT NOON BRIEFING, JAN. 29,” USIA Transcript, 1/30/97) denied press media reports that the US and the DPRK have reached a tentative agreement on the opening of a Liaison Office. “We have as a longer-term objective, and we set this with the authorities in Pyongyang, the opening of Liaison Offices in our respective capitals, but there’s been no agreement to do that. There are some remaining technical details that need to be worked out before we can agree to the establishment of Liaison Offices,” Burns said. In response to a question, Burns also said that he had no information concerning reports that DPRK assets were frozen in US banks.

2. Four-Party Peace Talks Briefing

The Associated Press (Robert H. Reid, “U.S.-KOREA TALKS IN DOUBT,” United Nations, 1/31/97) and United Press International (“N.KOREA BALKING AT PEACE BRIEFING,” Washington, 1/31/97) reported that Han Song-ryol of the DPRK mission to the United Nations said Friday that the DPRK will not attend the four-party peace talks briefing with the US and the ROK next week until negotiations with a private US firm on a proposed grain sale are “concluded satisfactorily.” The meeting, already delayed once, had been set for February 5 in New York. Han said the DPRK is now linking attendance of the briefing to the successful completion of talks with Cargill Inc., a commodity firm, on the s

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Lessons of NAFTA for APEC

Lessons of NAFTA for APEC #32 Mark J. Spalding, J.D., M.P.I.A.(1) The Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development * DRAFT Please Do Not Quote or Cite Without Permission *ABSTRACT At the beginning of this decade, environmentalists truly began to discover trade issues. The debate between environmentalists and trade liberation proponents has usually been framed […]

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NAPSNet Daily Report 29 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. People’s Republic of China

I. United States

1. DPRK Famine Prospects

The Associated Press (Robert H. Reid, “U.N.: NORTH KOREA HAS FOOD CRISIS,” United Nations, 1/29/97) reported that UN World Food Program spokesman Michael Ross said Wednesday that the DPRK’s food shortage is so acute that many city dwellers are receiving only 15 percent of the daily ration given to refugees in UN-managed camps in Africa. Dwindling supplies have forced the DPRK government to reduce the amount of food provided by the state-run ration system from about 14 ounces per person a few months ago to 3 1/2 ounces. Refugees in UN-supported camps receive about 23 ounces of rations a day. The UN agency estimates that the DPRK has only enough food in warehouses to last until late spring or early summer. One World Food Program official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said a sign of the crisis is the near total absence of animals — dogs, cats, chickens and cattle — throughout the DPRK. “This means they’ve been slaughtered for food,” the official said. The US State Department announced Monday that the DPRK had postponed by one week its meeting with US and ROK officials for a briefing on the four-party peace talks proposal, in order to conclude negotiations with Western firms on grain imports. Last week, InterAction, a coalition of 150 American humanitarian groups, said that the DPRK’s 23 million people are “in the throes of a life-threatening food shortage that could take on famine proportions in the months to come.” [Ed. note: For more information please see “DPRK Food Situation” in the US section of the January 23 Daily Report.]

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NAPSNet Daily Report 28 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. Briefing on Four Party Talks

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPARTMENT NOON BRIEFING, JAN. 27,” USIA Transcript, 1/28/97) discussed the DPRK’s request to postpone the US-ROK joint briefing on proposed four-party peace talks. Burns said the US and ROK had both accepted the request to postpone the meeting, set to take place in New York City, from January 29 to February 5. Burns said the DPRK said it wanted to place first priority on concluding discussions for grain imports currently taking place with “some private Western companies,” which Burns termed “a satisfactory explanation.”

2. DPRK-Taiwan Nuclear Waste Deal

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPARTMENT NOON BRIEFING, JAN. 27,” USIA Transcript, 1/28/97), in response to questions concerning the US position on the DPRK-Taiwan nuclear waste deal, said: “I’m not sure that the State Department has taken a position on that. We’ve heard about the deal, but I’m not sure we know enough about it to talk about it. Let me just say this; some positive things have happened concerning North Korea in recent weeks. We’ve seen the North state its deep regret for the submarine incident. There is every reason to think that implementation of the Agreed Framework continues to proceed normally. In fact, there’s no indication to the contrary, including the spent nuclear fuel canning operation at Yongbyon, North Korea, and the delivery of heavy

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NAPSNet Daily Report 27 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Russian Federation

I. United States

1. Four-Party Talks Briefing Delay

The Associated Press (“NORTH KOREA SEEKS DELAY IN TALKS,” Washington, 1/27/97) reported that the US State Department said Monday that the DPRK has postponed by one week the scheduled briefing by US and ROK officials on the four-party peace talks proposal. US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns said the planned meeting, whose venue is now set for New York, was being postponed from January 29 to February 5. Burns said the DPRK sought the postponement in order to conclude negotiations with Western firms on grain imports, and that he considered the DPRK explanation to be “satisfactory.” The negotiations apparently involve Cargill Inc., a commodities trading firm, which received Clinton administration approval a month ago to sell up to 500,000 metric tons of wheat or rice to the DPRK. [Ed. note: Please see the related item in the ROK section, below.]

2. DPRK-Taiwan Nuclear Waste Deal

United Press International (“TAIWAN DUMPING SPARKS S.KOREA PROTESTS,” Seoul, 1/25/97) reported that after Taiwan’s economy ministry said Thursday it will not block the shipment of some 60,000 barrels of low-level radioactive waste to the DPRK despite ROK objections, ROK demonstrators burned an effigy of Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui in angry protest. The Korea Federation for the Environmental Movement (KFEM) protested Saturday outside Taipei’s representative office in Seoul as other groups vowed to laun

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NAPSNet Daily Report 24 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Japan

I. United States

1. ROK-DPRK Relations

The AP-Dow Jones News Service (“N. KOREA ACCUSES S. KOREA OF TRYING TO BLOCK AID FROM JAPAN,” Seoul, 1/24/97) reported that the DPRK on Friday said that the ROK is trying to block Japanese humanitarian aid. The accusation, carried by the DPRK’s official Korean Central News Agency, came on the eve of a summit between Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto of Japan and ROK President Kim Young-sam. Japan hopes for a reopening of long-frozen talks on normalizing relations with the DPRK, which experts say will involve food aid as an incentive. The ROK wants its allies to hold off large assistance until the DPRK agrees to peace talks. [Ed. note: Please also see “ROK-Japan Relations” in this section, below.]

Reuters (“S.KOREA REOPENS DOOR TO INVESTMENT IN N.KOREA,” Seoul, 1/24/97) reported that the ROK on Friday opened the door for domestic companies to invest in the DPRK for the first time since the submarine incursion incident shut off all contact between the two sides. The ROK Unification Ministry said it had given approval to seven firms to open talks to develop a number of joint projects. But company executives and government officials cautioned against expecting speedy improvement in economic cooperation. “Today’s approval was just for contacts, not for any specific project. Our group also has no specific project there yet,” said a senior official of the Lotte Group, one of the seven firms. “There should first be development in the ove

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NAPSNet Daily Report 23 January, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. ROK Strikes

Reuters (“SEOUL WARNS STRIKERS, BLASTS OPPOSITION,” Seoul, 01/23/97) reported that ROK labor minister Jin Nyum was quoted by ministry officials as warning Thursday that the government would no longer tolerate illegal strikes. “The minister said the workers should stop illegal strikes while a solution is being sought by politicians,” Son Khong-ho, a director-general at the ministry, told Reuters. “He said no more illegal activities will be tolerated.” Jin did not specify what measures would be taken against strikers or when the government would act. Meanwhile, representatives of the ruling New Korea Party criticized opposition parties for dismissing President Kim Young-sam’s offer to reopen parliamentary debate over the new labor law. The opposition rejected Kim’s offer Wednesday, saying any debate in parliament could only be held on condition the law was first repealed. “It is really shameless behavior… for the opposition to demand the nullification of the law, while it could not provide an alternative and has not put forward its own draft,” a statement from the New Korea Party said. The party rammed the law through parliament during a seven-minute pre-dawn session December 26 while opposition legislators were asleep.

2. DPRK Defectors

Reuters (“HUNGER DROVE N. KOREANS ON TRIP TO SOUTH,” Seoul, 01/23/97) reported that a spokesman for the ROK Agency for National Security Planning was quoted in ROK media as

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