NAPSNet Daily Report 21 March, 1997

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"NAPSNet Daily Report 21 March, 1997", NAPSNet Daily Report, March 21, 1997, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-21-march-1997/

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Japan

IV. Russian Federation

I. United States

1. US Food Aid to DPRK

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPT. NOON BRIEFING, MARCH 20,” USIA Report, 3/21/97) told reporters during “on-the-record” discussions with reporters after his regular briefing that two US ships will deliver 27,000 metric tons of grains and foodstuffs to North Korea May 4 and May 12. The humanitarian aid is being given in response to an appeal by the World Food Program.

The Associated Press (“U.S.-KOREA FOOD AID DUE IN MAY,” Washington, 3/21/97) reported that the first shipment of a US$10 million US food aid package for the DPRK is expected to arrive May 4 at the port of Nampo. In the DPRK, the rice, corn and corn-soy blend will be delivered to officials of the World Food Program. Much of the food is intended for malnourished children under 5. The aid program was announced last month.

2. US Defense Department on Foreign Assistance

US Defense Secretary William Cohen (“DEFENSE SECRETARY COHEN ON U.S. SECURITY ASSISTANCE,” USIA Transcript, 3/21/97), in a March 20 appearance before the US House Committee on International Relations, argued that the US pursues policies of engagement around the world to ensure that diplomacy and military power act “in concert.” “Diplomacy without power,” he explained, “can produce dialogue without decision, while power without diplomacy can lead to arrogant chauvinism and senseless conflict.” In remarks during testimony to support of the Clinton administration’s request for fiscal year 1998 funding for International Military Education and Training and Foreign Military Financing programs, C

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Japan

IV. Russian Federation

I. United States

1. US Food Aid to DPRK

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPT. NOON BRIEFING, MARCH 20,” USIA Report, 3/21/97) told reporters during “on-the-record” discussions with reporters after his regular briefing that two US ships will deliver 27,000 metric tons of grains and foodstuffs to North Korea May 4 and May 12. The humanitarian aid is being given in response to an appeal by the World Food Program.

The Associated Press (“U.S.-KOREA FOOD AID DUE IN MAY,” Washington, 3/21/97) reported that the first shipment of a US$10 million US food aid package for the DPRK is expected to arrive May 4 at the port of Nampo. In the DPRK, the rice, corn and corn-soy blend will be delivered to officials of the World Food Program. Much of the food is intended for malnourished children under 5. The aid program was announced last month.

2. US Defense Department on Foreign Assistance

US Defense Secretary William Cohen (“DEFENSE SECRETARY COHEN ON U.S. SECURITY ASSISTANCE,” USIA Transcript, 3/21/97), in a March 20 appearance before the US House Committee on International Relations, argued that the US pursues policies of engagement around the world to ensure that diplomacy and military power act “in concert.” “Diplomacy without power,” he explained, “can produce dialogue without decision, while power without diplomacy can lead to arrogant chauvinism and senseless conflict.” In remarks during testimony to support of the Clinton administration’s request for fiscal year 1998 funding for International Military Education and Training and Foreign Military Financing programs, C

I. United States

1. US Food Aid to DPRK

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPT. NOON BRIEFING, MARCH 20,” USIA Report, 3/21/97) told reporters during “on-the-record” discussions with reporters after his regular briefing that two US ships will deliver 27,000 metric tons of grains and foodstuffs to North Korea May 4 and May 12. The humanitarian aid is being given in response to an appeal by the World Food Program.

The Associated Press (“U.S.-KOREA FOOD AID DUE IN MAY,” Washington, 3/21/97) reported that the first shipment of a US$10 million US food aid package for the DPRK is expected to arrive May 4 at the port of Nampo. In the DPRK, the rice, corn and corn-soy blend will be delivered to officials of the World Food Program. Much of the food is intended for malnourished children under 5. The aid program was announced last month.

2. US Defense Department on Foreign Assistance

US Defense Secretary William Cohen (“DEFENSE SECRETARY COHEN ON U.S. SECURITY ASSISTANCE,” USIA Transcript, 3/21/97), in a March 20 appearance before the US House Committee on International Relations, argued that the US pursues policies of engagement around the world to ensure that diplomacy and military power act “in concert.” “Diplomacy without power,” he explained, “can produce dialogue without decision, while power without diplomacy can lead to arrogant chauvinism and senseless conflict.” In remarks during testimony to support of the Clinton administration’s request for fiscal year 1998 funding for International Military Education and Training and Foreign Military Financing programs, Cohen defended a number of specific operations, including the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO). Cohen said: “From DOD’s perspective, this project is critical to safeguarding the security interests of the United States and its allies in the region. KEDO is charged with implementing technical aspects of the Agreed Framework, including delivery of heavy fuel oil and construction of two light water reactors in North Korea, in return for the North freezing activities at its nuclear facilities. A failure of KEDO’s efforts could lead to a reactivation of North Korea’s nuclear program, which would pose a substantial risk to U.S. forces in the region as well as heighten tensions and insecurity among all Northeast Asian countries. The Fiscal Year 1998 budget requests $30 million in non-security assistance funds to support KEDO. U.S. financial backing is extremely important in demonstrating to our KEDO partners, particularly the ROK and Japan, that the United States is willing to assume its share of the burden in this security enterprise. U.S. funding also sets an example for other potential contributors.”

3. ROK Financial Scandal

Reuters (“S.KOREAN PRESIDENT’S SON PROBED OVER PAYOFF RUMORS,” Seoul, 3/21/97) reported that police on Friday raided the offices of a ROK businessman in a probe into rumors that President Kim Young-sam’s son accepted a 200 billion won (US$226 million) kickback. Prosecution officials said they were looking into rumors that Kim Hyun-chul took the money from the businessman acting as an agent for failed Hanbo Steel Co. “The purpose is to confirm rumors that Kim Hyun-chul accepted 200 billion won ($226 million),” one official said. Parliament on Friday kicked off an investigation into funding for Hanbo and will call Kim Hyun-chul to testify. The ruling New Korea Party agreed to the parliamentary inquiry after opposition parties attacked an earlier probe by prosecutors as a whitewash that failed to bring to justice leading players in the scandal. Kim Hyun-chul issued an apology on Monday for causing trouble and anxiety and said he was ready to accept punishment if he had done wrong. His father said on television last month he felt shamed his son had been linked to the Hanbo scandal.

4. US-Russia Declaration on Chemical Weapons Ban

US President Bill Clinton and Russian President Boris Yeltsin Friday issued a Joint Statement on the Chemical Weapons Convention, stressing their commitment to the elimination from national arsenals of this class of weapons of mass destruction. The two Presidents underscored their support for the Chemical Weapons Convention and their determination to expedite ratification of the Convention by both the United States and Russia. Following is the White House text of the joint U.S.-Russian statement on chemical weapons released at the Helsinki Summit March 21 (“U.S.-RUSSIAN JOINT STATEMENT ON CHEMICAL WEAPONS,” USIA Transcript, 3/21/97):

“Joint U.S.-Russian Statement on Chemical Weapons

“President Clinton and President Yeltsin discussed issues relating to the entry into force of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction. They stressed the commitment of the United States and Russia to full and effective accomplishment of the tasks and objectives of the convention.

“The Presidents reaffirmed their intention to take the steps necessary to expedite ratification in each of the two countries. President Clinton expressed his determination that the United States be a party when the Convention enters into force in April of this year, and is strongly urging prompt Senate action. President Yeltsin noted that the Convention has been submitted to the Duma with his strong recommendation for prompt ratification.

“Mindful of their special role and responsibility in the matter of chemical disarmament, the United States and Russia understand that their participation in the Convention is important to its effective implementation and universality.

“The Presidents noted that cooperation between the two countries in the prohibition of chemical weapons has enabled both countries to enhance openness regarding their military chemical potential and to gain experience with procedures and measures for verifying compliance with the Chemical Weapons Convention. The Parties will continue cooperation between them in chemical disarmament.

“The United States will seek appropriation of necessary funds to build a facility for the destruction of neuroparalytic toxins in Russia as previously agreed.”

II. Republic of Korea

1. Hwang Defection

A senior ROK Foreign Ministry official hinted yesterday at the possibility that top DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop would come to Seoul earlier than planned. The ROK and the PRC reached an understanding Hwang would stay in a third country for “much longer than 10 days” when they agreed that he would depart Beijing on Tuesday. But his remarks appeared to imply that the ROK may negotiate again with the PRC on the timing of Hwang’s arrival in Seoul, citing security concerns being raised by the Philippine government over an extended stay there by Hwang. Philippine Foreign Secretary Domingo Siazon told Japanese television on Wednesday that Hwang will leave the Philippines for the ROK within two weeks. ROK President Kim Young-sam sent a letter to his PRC counterpart Jiang Zemin yesterday, expressing gratitude over the PRC’s cooperation in resolving tthe case of Hwang’s defection. ROK Foreign Minister Yoo Chong-ha sent a similar letter to his counterpart Qian Qichen on Wednesday. (Korea Herald, “SEOUL OFFICIAL HINTS AT EARLY ARRIVAL,” 03/21/97)

2. Korean Unification

About 2.6-3.1 percent of the ROK’s gross national product (GNP) will be required to resolve the DPRK’s poverty after economic integration between the two Koreas, a study showed. Researcher Park Jin at the Korea Development Institute (KDI) announced yesterday, “After the economic integration of the two Koreas, the industrial foundation in the North will disintegrate. Its poverty level will be aggravated due to the high unemployment rate and the abolition of food rationing system.” (Joong Ang Ilbo, “3% OF SOUTH KOREA’S GNP NEEDED TO RESOLVE THE NORTH’S POVERTY AFTER UNIFICATION,” 03/21/97)

3. ROK Congressman Visits US

Kim Dae-jung, leader of the ROK main opposition National Congress for New Politics (NCNP), will visit the US from April 5-13, NCNP spokesman Chung announced yesterday. He stated, “Chairman Kim will engage in suprapartisan diplomacy to discuss security on the Korean peninsula and North Korean issues in meetings with the government and congressional leaders of the United States.” The spokesman added Kim will also discuss trade friction between the two countries and engage in other activities as the leader of the main opposition and as a world-renowned human rights activist. (Joong Ang Ilbo, “NCNP LEADER, KIM DAE-JUNG TO VISIT THE U.S. ON APRIL 5,” 03/21/97)

4. Japanese General Visits ROK

General Nobutoshi Watanabe, chief of the Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force, arrived in Seoul yesterday for a three-day visit at the invitation of his ROK counterpart General Doh Il-kyu. Watanabe will meet Korean military leaders for talks on ways to further improve bilateral military cooperation and exchanges between their countries. He will also visit the truce village of Panmunjom, the Army Headquarters, and the Special Warfare Command before leaving Seoul tomorrow. (Korea Herald, “JAPANESE GENRAL HERE FOR TALKS, EXCHANGES,” 03/21/97)

III. Japan

1. Japan-PRC Defense Consultation

Responding to demands by Japan that the PRC be more transparent about its military activities, the PRC revealed during the 4th Japan-PRC Security working-level talks held at the Foreign Ministry in Tokyo on March 15 that it will announce at the proper time its second defense white paper. However, the PRC deflected criticism by Japan regarding the PRC’s rising military spending by stating that the increase is acceptable given the PRC’s domestic economic growth and that the increase is far less than that of some advanced countries. The PRC also demanded that the Japan-US Security Treaty remain bilateral as it is concerned that the recent Japan-US Joint Security Declaration may expand to the whole Asia-Pacific region. In response, Japan stressed that the Joint Declaration will in no way change the Japan-US Security Treaty. (The Asahi Shimbun, “PRC CONCERNED OVER EXPANSION OF JAPAN- US SECURITY ARRANGEMENT,” 2, 3/16/97, the Sankei Shimbun, “JAPAN DEMANDS PRC BE MORE TRANSPARENT ABOUT MILITARY SPENDING,” 3, 3/16/97).

2. Japanese Food Aid to DPRK

The Sankei Shimbun (“JAPANESE FOREIGN MINISTER SAYS ABDUCTION CASE MAY BE SEPARATED FROM FOOD AID TO DPRK,” 2, 3/19/97) reported that Japanese Foreign Minister Yukihiko Ikeda stated at an Upper House Foreign Committee meeting on March 18 that the Foreign Ministry will not necessarily link the suspected DPRK abduction of a Japanese high school girl twenty years ago to Japan’s food aid to the DPRK. He also announced that the Foreign Ministry is ready to follow the US and ROK’s decisions to send food aid to the DPRK through the World Food Program. However, Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) Secretary General Koichi Kato said at a LDP senior member meeting on March 17 that the decision on food aid should be made based on how the DPRK responds to the Four-Party Talks. Another LDP Diet member stated to reporters that if food aid is to be considered a humanitarian issue, the suspected abduction should also be dealt with from the same perspective.

An Asahi Shimbun editorial (“HWANG DEFECTION GOOD OPPORTUNITY FOR EASING TENSION ON KOREAN PENINSULA,” 5, 3/19/97) gave credit to the PRC for its careful handling of the Hwang defection and to the US for its announcement of food aid to the DPRK, stating that these actions greatly contributed to preventing the Hwang defection from worsening North-South tensions and created an opportunity to improve the situation. Positive signs include the DPRK’s de facto approval of the Hwang defection, the DPRK’s participation in the US-ROK briefing of the Four-Party Talks, and progress in the DPRK-US talks on liaison office exchanges. But continued negative signs include emphasis on the communist Red Banner as symbolizing the regime, generational changes in the military leadership, and increasing criticism of domestic reformists. The editorial expressed concern that these negative signs may show that Kim Jong-il still holds strong control of the DPRK regime and that he may suddenly scuttle the existing Four-Party relations, especially those between the ROK and the DPRK. The editorial suggests that Japan separate the suspected DPRK abduction of a Japanese high school girl from food aid and that Japan follow US and ROK decisions to give food aid to the DPRK to help ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

3. Suspected DPRK Abduction of Japanese Girl

The Sankei Shimbun reported that the parents of Megumi Yokota, who was reportedly abducted by DPRK agents twenty years ago, officially demanded after returning from the ROK on March 19 that Niigata Prefecture investigate the suspected abduction. (“PARENTS OF MEGUMI YOKOTA DEMAND OFFICIAL INVESTIGATION,” Evening Edition 2, 3/19/97). The parents visited the ROK to collect information on their daughter and met with a defected ex-DPRK agent who allegedly had been involved in the incident. The Niigata Prefecture Governor revealed that the prefecture is now considering requesting the national government to start an official investigation. The parents told reporters that the continuing North-South tensions make their daughter’s return difficult but that they expect much of international cooperation. In addition, the report quoted Foreign Minister Yukihiko Ikeda as saying that the Foreign Ministry is now working hard to gather accurate information on the situation.

IV. Russian Federation

1. DPRK Food Crisis

Izvestia’s Yuriy Savenkov (“A PROBLEM IN NORTH KOREA: HOW TO GET FOOD WITH ONE’S RATION CARD?”, Moscow, 3, 3/21/97) reported that Catherine Bertini, the Executive Director of the World Food Program stated in Beijing that if the DPRK food situation doesn’t change radically the DPRK will run out of food between late April and early May. Accordig to Bertini, an average DPRK citizen gets 100 grams of rice a day which is one-fifth the international standard norm for a refugee. During her trip to the DPRK’s southern regions she saw many undernourished children and heard about cases of disease in the northern regions caused by excessive eating of birch bark. She noted however, that while the ROK demands that food aid should not go to the north Korean People’s Army, it is precisely this concern that that DPRK leader Kim Jong-il is determined to resolve. According to Bertini, Kim believes that corrupt party and government officials were the cause of the food situation and promised to punish them severely.

2. Hwang Defection

Izvestia’s Yuriy Savenkov (“A RUNAWAY FROM PYONGYANG GOES TO MANILA”, Moscow, 3, 3/18/97) reported that DPRK former chief ideologue and recent defector Hwang Jang-yop has been taken by a military airplane from a PRC Air Force base near Beijing to Manila, the Philippines. According to other sources, Mr.Hwang is to spend about a month at the former US Air Force base at Subik Bay and afterwards will travel to Seoul. Izvestia’s author speculated that the DPRK is satisfied with the outcome because the ROK’s wish to get Mr. Hwang directly from the PRC hasn’t been fulfilled. As such, the PRC managed to avoid antagonizing either its “capitalist friend” or the “socialist comrade”.

3. Japanese Nuclear Disaster Similar to Chernobyl

Segodnya’s Ivan Shomov (“A ‘MINI-CHERNOBYL’ IN THE COUNTRY OF THE RISING SUN”, Moscow, 1, 4, 3/20/97) reported on the 3/11/97 accident at the Tokaimura nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Japan, about 100 kilometers from Tokyo. Rendering the details of the disaster where 37 out of 112 plant employees suffered from radiation, Segodnya’s author stressed that the “Japanese nuclear officials” at the plant preferred not to notify the local and national authorities immediately by arguing that there was nothing to be afraid of and thus behaving “in the best traditions” of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union during the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident.

4. RF Position on Chemical Weapons Convention

Segodnya’s Aleksandr Koretskiy (“YELTSIN ORDERED THE DUMA ABOUT ‘GASES'”, Moscow, 1-4, 3/19/97) reported that RF President Boris Yeltsin sent to the RF State Duma for ratification the international Convention banning the development, production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons signed by the RF in Paris on 1/13/93. But as the international ratification deadline of 4/29/97 gets nearer both the RF and the USA get more and more reasons to demand a postponement of the deadline and even a revision of the whole Convention. The Chairman of US Senate Foreign Affairs Committee Senator Jesse Helms said the Convention cannot not be ratified until 12 conditions are fulfilled, including a “protection of US citizens’ rights from international inspectors’ acts.” In addition, Senator Helms is against the financial arrangements for chemical weapons destruction procedures. And he also casts doubts about official USSR 1990 statements concerning the actual size of RF chemical weapons stockpiles. As a result, the US Administration will probably have to request that the RF should confirm the previous statements which in turn might jeopardize the Convention ratification in the RF State Duma.

5. RF-PRC Relations

Segodnya (“PRC FOREIGN MINISTER TO VISIT MOSCOW”, Moscow, 1, 3/20/97) reported that PRC Foreign Minister Qian Quichen will visit the RF on 3/24/27/97 to have talks with RF Foreign Minister Yevgeniy Primakov. Bilateral PRC-RF relations are to be discussed in view of the forthcoming visit of PRC Chairman Jiang Zemin to Moscow in April.

Segodnya (“PRC CHAIRMAN JIANG ZEMIN TO VISIT RUSSIA IN APRIL, Moscow, 1, 3/13/97) reported that PRC Chairman Jiang Zemin will visit the RF during the last ten days of April. Agreement is to be signed during his visit on mutual troop reduction in border areas of the RF, Kazakhstan, Kyrghyzia, Tadjikistan, and the PRC. Also PRC Ambassador to the RF Li Fenglin stated yesterday that “in the course of the visit, an important document will be made public in which the points of view of Russia and China on a number of international problems will be presented”.

6. RF-Belarus-PRC Axis Against NATO

Nezavisimaia Gazeta’s Marina Volkova and Yuras Karmanov (“ALEKSANDR LUKASHENKO AGAIN TRIED TO INTERCEPT THE UNIFICATION INITIATIVE FROM BORIS YELTSIN”, Moscow, 1, 3/13/97) reported that the 3rd session of RF-Belarus Parliamentary Assembly was held in Moscow. Belarus President Aleksandr Lukashenko made a 2-hour speech at the session. Speaking on a whole range of issues, he said that the RF-Belarus integration is to lead to a creation of a RF-Belarus union and eventually a “geopolitical axis” which is to include the PRC. According to Lukashenko, the PRC-RF-Belarus alliance’s spearhead will be aimed towards the NATO. Nezavisimaia gazeta’s authors commented that, although one cannot speak for the PRC, the RF presently holding negotiations with the NATO certainly is not ready to access those “Byelorussian variations”.

7. RF Media on US Policy Toward PRC

Nezavisimaia gazeta’s Dmitriy Kosyrev (“CHINESE DILEMMA OF AMERICA”, Moscow, 4, 3/21/97) commented on US policy of “involvement” towards the PRC and argued that in general it has failed. The PRC doesn’t seem to have evolved into a more democratic society and, on the contrary, practically all its dissenters are in prison or exile. Nezavisimaia gazeta’s author speculated that possibly the PRC learned something from “Washington’s similar policy towards the USSR” that grew weaker and collapsed without any countervailing economic benefits. In the author’s opinion, in the USA presently there is a partisan division on the subject, with the Democrats being still in favour of the “involvement policy” and the Republicans arguing for a “containment” of the PRC. Such a “split” is natural when the Pacific and even world leadership is at stake. Meanwhile the PRC plans to outstrip the USA and become the world economic leader by the mid-21st century. The author wondered if it should be admitted that since 1994 the US-PRC “game” has been going on an “equal footing” and from now on there will be no US leadership in Asia.

8. RF-PRC Border Demarcation

Kommersant-DAILY’s Denis Dyomkin and Yevgeniy Vnouchkov (“NAZDRATENKO CONSIDERS THE DEMARCATION A GIVING UP OF RUSSIA’S TERRITORY”, Moscow, 1-2, 3/21/97) reported that in the Primorskiy Area in RF Far East an urgent campaign has been started in favour of holding an all-Area referendum among the local population on the issue of concession of some land to the PRC. The campaign leaders believe that if the PRC gets a land strip from the RF in accordance with the 5/16/91 USSR-PRC border demarcation agreement and thus obtains an access to the sea to build a port there, then the RF will be at a strategic disadvantage. RF Foreign Ministry officials stated that they know nothing about the campaign but will continue to implement the 1991 agreement. They said a PRC sea port construction is impossible because even if constructed it will be separated from the open sea by 40 kilometers of RF and DPRK territorial waters.

9. RF Far East Energy Shortage

Segodnya’s Oleg Kryuchek (“ONLY A DAILY RESERVE OF FUEL AT POWER PLANTS IN PRIMORIYE”, Moscow, 2, 3/14/97) reported that in the Primorskiy Area in RF Far East again there are cases of electricity supplies to households and industrial enterprises being cut off for 6 to 8 hours. In a day or two the cut offs are expected to become as long as 12 to 14 hours. A protracted strike at a majority of local coal mines is the major reason. The largest power plants of the area possess a minimal daily reserve of fuel and operate under emergency conditions.

10. RF Military Morals Meeting

Nezavisimaia gazeta (“SECRET CONFERENCE AT THE DEFENSE MINISTRY”, Moscow, 1, 3/13/97) reported that on 3/14/97 a secret conference is to be held at the RF Defense Ministry to discuss the moral and psychological state of the RF Armed Forces. There is also a confidential report that the appointment of Anatoliy Chubais to the position of the RF First Vice Premier “has been perceived extremely negatively” by the troops. A similar assessment has been given to President Boris Yeltsin’s recent personnel decisions by those in other power structures including Russia’s Federal Security Service.

The NAPSNet Daily Report aims to serve as a forum for dialogue and exchange among peace and security specialists. Conventions for readers and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are available to all recipients. For descriptions of the world wide web sites used to gather information for this report, or for more information on web sites with related information, see the collection of other NAPSNet resources.
We invite you to reply to today’s report, and we welcome commentary or papers for distribution to the network.

Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development.

Wade Huntley: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Choi Chung-moon: cily@star.elim.net
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Chunsi Wu: dlshen@fudan.ihep.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ihep.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Hiroyasu Akutsu: akutsu@glocomnet.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Return to the top of this Daily Report

Go to the Daily Report Archive

Return to the Nautilus Institute Home Page

The NAPSNet Daily Report aims to serve as a forum for dialogue and exchange among peace and security specialists. Conventions for readers and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are available to all recipients. For descriptions of the world wide web sites used to gather information for this report, or for more information on web sites with related information, see the collection of other NAPSNet resources.
We invite you to reply to today’s report, and we welcome commentary or papers for distribution to the network.

Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development.

Wade Huntley: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Choi Chung-moon: cily@star.elim.net
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Chunsi Wu: dlshen@fudan.ihep.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ihep.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Hiroyasu Akutsu: akutsu@glocomnet.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Return to the top of this Daily Report

Go to the Daily Report Archive

Return to the Nautilus Institute Home Page


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