Daily Report Archives

Daily Report Archives

Established in December 1993, the Nautilus Institute’s *N*ortheast *A*sia *P*eace and *S*ecurity *N*etwork (NAPSNet) Daily Report served thousands of readers  in more than forty countries, including policy makers, diplomats, aid organizations, scholars, donors, activists, students, and journalists.

The NAPSNet Daily Report aimed to serve a community of practitioners engaged in solving the complex security and sustainability issues in the region, especially those posed by the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program and the threat of nuclear war in the region.  It was distributed by email rom 1993-1997, and went on-line in December 1997, which is when the archive on this site begins. The format at that time can be seen here.

However, for multiple reasons—the rise of instantaneous news services, the evolution of the North Korea and nuclear issues, the increasing demand for specialized and synthetic analysis of these and related issues, and the decline in donor support for NAPSNet—the Institute stopped producing the Daily Report news summary service as of December 17, 2010.

NAPSNet

NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND DELIVERY SYSTEMS THAT MIGHT BE IMPLICATED IN NUCLEAR USE INVOLVING THE KOREAN PENINSULA

MATT KORDA JANUARY 20 2022 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Matt Korda presents a comprehensive account of the DPRK’s nuclear warheads, delivery systems, fuel types, and launch systems, followed by an analysis of the DPRK’s and the United States’ nuclear doctrine and potential nuclear use.  Matt Korda is Senior Research Associate and Project Manager, Nuclear Information Project Federation of American Scientists. This […]

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ASYMMETRIC WMD THREATS: DPRK NUCLEAR, CYBER, AND BIO-CHEMICAL WEAPONS CAPABILITIES

SANG HYUN LEE JANUARY 17 2022 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Sang Hyung Lee assesses the evolution and state of play of DPRK’s current asymmetric capabilities. He argues that DPRK’s asymmetric forces consisting of increasingly-sophisticated nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, bio-chemical weapons, and cyberattacks pose an existential threat to the ROK, undermine stability in Northeast Asia […]

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THE DELIBERATE EMPLOYMENT OF UNITED STATES NUCLEAR WEAPONS: ESCALATION TRIGGERS ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA

DARYL G. PRESS JANUARY 11 2022 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Daryl Press analyses scenarios of US use of nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula. He argues that the most likely route to US nuclear employment is linked to the DPRK’s own use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), which includes use of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. Daryl Press is […]

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COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION PLUS: BREAKING THE STALEMATE WITH THE DPRK

JOEL PETERSSON IVRE, ELAINE NATALIE, SHATABHISHA SHETTY JANUARY 6 2022 At a time when denuclearization talks with the DPRK are stalled, the authors argue that: “alternative approaches must be explored. CTR Plus offers a new approach by proposing discrete, small to medium scale localized projects – with the potential for large-scale impact – which address […]

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NUCLEAR-CAPABLE MISSILES

NICK HANSEN DECEMBER 13, 2021  I.  INTRODUCTION Nick Hansen offers a primer on the incredible array of nuclear missile delivery systems currently deployed and under development by the six nuclear-armed states in the Asia-Pacific region – the United States, Russia, China, India, Pakistan and the DPRK. He argues that the main driver of the profusion […]

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NUCLEAR-USE CASES FOR CONTEMPLATING CRISIS AND CONFLICT ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA

PAUL K. DAVIS AND BRUCE W. BENNETT DECEMBER 9, 2021 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Paul Davis and Bruce Bennett sketch ten cases in which nuclear weapons might be brandished or used in a Korea-originated crisis. They offer insights on how and why nuclear war could occur, and the corresponding circumstances that must be avoided. The […]

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THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON THE DPRK’S HEALTH SYSTEM AND FUTURE INTER-KOREAN BIOMEDICAL CLUSTER COOPERATION IN THE POST-PANDEMIC ERA

SANG MIN PARK NOVEMBER 8 2021 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Sang Min Park discusses the impact of COVID-19 and the international sanctions regime on the DPRK healthcare system, trends in global health aid for the DPRK and the role of the ROK, and a future inter-Korean Biomedical Cluster Cooperation model in a post-pandemic era, […]

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INTER-KOREAN SOLIDARITY AROUND COVID-19, UNDER THE NORTHEAST ASIAN PUBLIC HEALTH INITIATIVE (NEAPHI), AS A CONTRIBUTION TO COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION (CTR+)

SHIN YOUNG-JEON NOVEMBER 2, 2021 I.  INTRODUCTION In this essay, Shin Young-jeon assesses the potential for the Northeast Asian Public Health Initiative (NEAPHI) to contribute to Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR+) given the COVID-19 situation in the DPRK and the operational status, limitations, and future challenges that NEAPHI must address. Young-jeon Shin is a professor at […]

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SPACE ENGAGEMENT AND COOPERATION WITH THE DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF KOREA (DPRK)

NAMRATA GOSWAMI OCTOBER 25 2021 I.  INTRODUCTION Namrata Goswami examines the DPRK’s existing space capabilities, explores how space cooperation can be operationalized and funded, and offers a scenario-based analysis of the DPRK’s space militarization escalation and its broader impact.  Namrata Goswami is an independent scholar on international relations, space policy, and conflict resolution. Her co-authored book Scramble for the […]

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A LOOMING STRATEGIC ARMS RACE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: A CHINESE PERSPECTIVE

LUO XI OCTOBER 22 2021   I.  INTRODUCTION   Luo Xi cautions that an unrestrained nuclear arms race between the United States and Russia affects China’s calculations of its nuclear retaliatory capability, increasing the complexity of interactions between the three nuclear powers, and complicating future arms control negotiations.  Luo Xi is a Research ellow at the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association (CACDA) and has a PhD in International Politics from Renmin University of China. […]

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