AdaptNet for 2 July 2013

Recommended Citation

"AdaptNet for 2 July 2013", ADAPTNet English Edition, July 01, 2013, https://nautilus.org/adaptnet/adaptnet-for-2-july-2013/

A Guide to Monitoring & Evaluating Coastal Adaptation
Effects of Educational Attainment on Climate Risk Vulnerability
Public Risks and the Challenges to Climate-Change Adaptation
Improving Cross-sectoral Adaptation for Coastal Settlements
Climate Change Adaptation in the Boardroom
Conference on Sustainable Development and Business in Asia

A Guide to Monitoring & Evaluating Coastal Adaptation

Coastal adaptation is of increasing importance to local governments in Australian coastal areas as they address the impacts of climate change to reduce vulnerability to extreme events. This guide provides a basis for monitoring and evaluating the climate change adaptation strategies and practices of local governments in coastal areas. It facilitates assessment of adaptation planning, implementation and progress against best practice.

A Guide to Monitoring & Evaluating Coastal Adaptation: Prioritising Coastal Adaptation and Development Options for Local Government, Robert B. Mangoyana et al., Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency, Australian Government, 2013 [847 KB, PDF]

Effects of Educational Attainment on Climate Risk Vulnerability

The paper examines whether education significantly increases coping capacity with regard to particular climatic changes, and whether it improves the resilience of people to climate risks in general. It presents projections of populations by age, sex, and level of educational attainment to 2050, thus providing an appropriate tool for anticipating societies’ future adaptive capacities based on alternative education scenarios associated with different policies.

Effects of Educational Attainment on Climate Risk Vulnerability, Erich Striessnig, Wolfgang Lutz and Anthony G. Patt., Ecology and Society, vol. 18, no. 1, 2013

Public Risks and the Challenges to Climate-Change Adaptation

The article presents new models that are emerging in research and planning practice which link collaborative governance with anticipatory governance. Coupling the models offers a new approach to planning that simultaneously formulates strategic guidance for current decisions to achieve future resiliency goals, and builds supportive networks of stakeholders. The article offers recommendations on how to make the transition to plans that are premised on uncertainty, flexible polices, monitoring, innovation, and feedback.

Public Risks and the Challenges to Climate-Change Adaptation: A Proposed Framework for Planning in the Age of Uncertainty, Philip Berke and Ward Lyles, A Journal of Policy Development and Research, vol. 15, no. 1, 2013 [650 KB, PDF]

Improving Cross-sectoral Adaptation for Coastal Settlements

The paper investigates the benefits and challenges to cross-sectoral adaptation to address climate change in coastal areas. It describes how such policies and programmes were generated as part of SEQCARI (South East Queensland climate adaptation research initiative). The paper discusses key considerations that can inform the development and assessment of cross-sectoral climate change adaptation policies and programmes in highly urbanized coastal areas.

Improving Cross-sectoral Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal Settlements: Insights from South East Queensland, Australia, S. Serrao-Neumann et al., Reg Environ Change, Open Access, DOI 10.1007/s10113-013-0442-6, 2013 [449 KB, PDF]

Climate Change Adaptation in the Boardroom

This report aims to be useful for Australian organisations, policy makers, regulators and to researchers in adaptation science. It asserts that despite action by many transnationals and international firms, it seems evident that most Australian companies appear to be struggling to move forward in responding to climate change impacts, apparently paralyzed by short-term profit-first thinking, uncertain political risks and a corporate culture unused to volatility and disruption.

Climate Change Adaptation in the Boardroom, Gareth Johnston, Donovan Burton and Mark Baker-Jones, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Gold Coast, Australia, 2013 [1.80 MB, PDF]

Conference on Sustainable Development and Business in Asia

Building on the success from the last year, the 2013 Conference on Sustainable Development and Business in Asia, to be held in Bangkok, Thailand, in November 2013 offers a platform for scholarly and applied conversations among a wide variety of stakeholders concerned with the continual challenge of advancing the sustainable development and business agenda: people, planet, and growth.

Conference on Sustainable Development and Business in Asia, Oxford University-Department of International Development (UK), Dominican University of California-School of Business & Management (USA), University of Illinois at Chicago-Institute for Environmental Science and Policy (USA), and International Management Institute (India) Bangkok, Thailand, 4-6 November 2013

For further information, please contact the editor, Saleem Janjua: daptnet@rmit.edu.au

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Professor Darryn McEvoy, Program Leader, RMIT University Climate Change Adaptation Programme

Professor Peter Hayes, Co-founder and Executive Director of Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability

Dr. Saleem Janjua, Editor, AdaptNet

AdaptNet is a free fortnightly report produced by RMIT University Global Cities Research Institute’s Climate Change Adaptation Programme, Melbourne, Australia. It is published in partnership with the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability.


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