AdaptNet for 18 June 2013

Recommended Citation

"AdaptNet for 18 June 2013", ADAPTNet English Edition, June 18, 2013, https://nautilus.org/adaptnet/adaptnet-for-18-june-2013/

1. MCA of Coastal Adaptation Options for Local Government
2. Building Shared Understanding and Capacity for Climate Action
3. Floods: Health Effects and their Prevention
4. Can IWRM Increase Adaptive Capacity to Climate Adaptation?
5. Challenges of Adaptation for Local Governments
6. Sate of Australian Cities Conference 2013

MCA of Coastal Adaptation Options for Local Government

This report undertakes a multi-criteria analysis (MCA) of coastal adaptation options in conjunction with local government in three Australian regions: metropolitan Sydney; Bega Valley Shire Council in coastal New South Wales; and Sunshine Coast Regional Council in Queensland. It explores how different local government perspectives interact with assessments of place-based hazards and assets at risk to influence the utility of different illustrative adaptation options.

A Multi-criteria Analysis of Coastal Adaptation Options for Local Government: Prioritising Coastal Adaptation and Development Options for Local Government, Robert B. Mangoyana et al., Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency, Australian Government, 2013 [9.72 MB, PDF]

Building Shared Understanding and Capacity for Climate Action

The article describes communication efforts undertaken in Ghana, India, Malawi, and Mongolia to develop and implement climate risk communication strategies that emphasize collective knowledge generation between researchers and stakeholders. It underscores the critical importance of presenting complex information in locally relevant terms to facilitate shared understanding of climate risks.

Building Shared Understanding and Capacity for Action: Insights on Climate Risk Communication from India, Ghana, Malawi, and Mongolia, Jon Padgham et al., International Journal of Communication, vol. 7, pp. 970-983, 2013 [229 KB, PDF]

Floods: Health Effects and their Prevention

The report assesses the effect of floods on health as well as identifying measures to prevent or minimize those effects in European member states. It provides decision-makers with evidence for action before, during, and/or after flooding events. The report addresses primary, secondary and tertiary prevention for managing flood risk with a range of interventions and measures to reduce the impact on human health.

Floods in the WHO European Region: Health Effects and their Prevention, Bettina Menne and Virginia Murray (editors), World Health Organization-Regional Office for Europe, 2013 [16.7 MB, PDF]

Can IWRM Increase Adaptive Capacity to Climate Adaptation?

The paper gauges the extent to which integrated water resources management (IWRM) principles can enhance the adaptive capacity of water management through reducing vulnerability and increasing the resilience of social-ecological systems. It suggests that IWRM has significant potential for supporting some of the key determinants of adaptive capacity. However, despite IWRM being promoted as an attractive approach, the paper argues that IWRM, as currently practiced, cannot readily enhance flexibility and adaptability required for climate change adaptation.

Can Integrated Water Resources Management Increase Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change Adaptation? A Critical Review, Animesh K. Gain, Josselin J. Rouillard, David Benson, Journal of Water Resource and Protection, vol. 5, pp. 11-20, 2013 [157 KB, PDF]

Challenges of Adaptation for Local Governments

NCCARF’s policy guidance briefs address key challenges to effectively adapt Australia to a variable and changing climate, providing policy advice designed for use by policy makers at Commonwealth and State levels. This brief deals with the challenges of adaptation for local governments, which play a critical front-line role in Australia’s response to the impacts of climate change and sea level rise.

Challenges of Adaptation for Local Governments, NCCARF Policy Guidance Brief 5, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Queensland, Australia, 2013 [887 KB, PDF]

State of Australian Cities Conference 2013

This conference will take place from 26-29 November 2013 in Sydney, Australia. It marks the 10th anniversary of the first SOAC (State of Australian Cities) conference, held in Parramatta in 2003. As such, the 2013 conference aims to represent a significant point of progress for urban research in Australia. Ten years on from that first conference, the SOAC conference series has established itself as one of the leading conferences on Australian urban research, covering the full range of urban research interests including climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Sate of Australian Cities (SOAC) Conference, Sate of Australian Cities Research Network (SOACRN), Australia, 26-29 November 2013

For further information, please contact the editor, Saleem Janjua: daptnet@rmit.edu.au

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Professor Darryn McEvoy, Program Leader, RMIT University Climate Change Adaptation Programme

Professor Peter Hayes, Co-founder and Executive Director of Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability

Dr. Saleem Janjua, Editor, AdaptNet

AdaptNet is a free fortnightly report produced by RMIT University Global Cities Research Institute’s Climate Change Adaptation Programme, Melbourne, Australia. It is published in partnership with the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability.

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