Daily Report Archives

Daily Report Archives

Established in December 1993, the Nautilus Institute’s *N*ortheast *A*sia *P*eace and *S*ecurity *N*etwork (NAPSNet) Daily Report served thousands of readers  in more than forty countries, including policy makers, diplomats, aid organizations, scholars, donors, activists, students, and journalists.

The NAPSNet Daily Report aimed to serve a community of practitioners engaged in solving the complex security and sustainability issues in the region, especially those posed by the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program and the threat of nuclear war in the region.  It was distributed by email rom 1993-1997, and went on-line in December 1997, which is when the archive on this site begins. The format at that time can be seen here.

However, for multiple reasons—the rise of instantaneous news services, the evolution of the North Korea and nuclear issues, the increasing demand for specialized and synthetic analysis of these and related issues, and the decline in donor support for NAPSNet—the Institute stopped producing the Daily Report news summary service as of December 17, 2010.

NAPSNet

NAPSNet Daily Report 28 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. Republic of Korea

II. Japan

I. Republic of Korea

1. ROK, UN Opposition of Taiwan’s Nuclear Waste Disposal Plans

The ROK’s endeavors to stop Taiwan from exporting nuclear waste to the DPRK received an international boost Wednesday when the UN General Assembly agreed to include a related clause in the closing document of its special session. ROK Foreign Minister Yoo Chong-ha said that participating countries in the Earth Summit agreed to stipulate opposition to “transboundary” transportation of radioactive waste. According to a relevant part of the document draft released by ROK officials, the UN urges countries to store radioactive waste within their respective territories. “…It is best for radioactive waste to be disposed of in the state in which it was generated as far as is compatible with the safety of the management of such material,” the draft read. “Governments should finalize this text and are urged to ratify and implement it as soon as possible so as to further improve practice and strengthen safety in this area… The issue of potential transboundary environmental effects of activities related to the management of radioactive waste and the question of prior notification, relevant information and consultation with states that could potentially be affected by such effects, should be further addressed within the appropriate forums,” the draft document added. ROK President Kim Young-sam, in a keynote speech to the UN conference Monday, appealed to all countries to pay heed to ROK’s concerns and pressure the Taiwanese government. (Korea Herald, Chon Shi-yong, “UN OPPOSES TAIWAN’S NUCLEAR WASTE SHIPMENT TO DPRK; MINISTER YOO SAYS FOLLOWING SPECIAL SESSION,” New York, 06/27/97)

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NAPSNet Daily Report 26-27 March, 1997

  I. United States 1. Gore Visit to China John King of the Associated Press reported in the Washington Post (“GORE: CHINA RECEPTIVE ON RIGHTS”, Beijing, 3/26/97) that US Vice President Al Gore believes Beijing will do more to open its markets to US products and be more receptive to human rights discussions. Gore noted […]

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Policy Forum 97-03: Ending the Korean Armistice Agreement: The Legal Issues

This new study on the legal issues involved in ending the Korean Armistice is an important contribution to the public understanding of the issues underlying the U.S.-North Korea-South Korea joint briefings on the proposed 4-power talks to end the Korean conflict, schedule to start on March 5. Patrick M. Norton currently is a partner in the law firm Alston & Bird, in Washington D.C. He previously worked for the U.S. State Department studying the legal aspects of ending the Korean Armistice, and is uniquely qualified to provide a U.S. perspective on this topic.

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NAPSNet Daily Report 24 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea 03/24/97

III. Russian Federation

I. United States

1. Hwang Defection

Seth Mydans reported in the New York Times (“REPORTERS HUNT FOR NORTH KOREAN DEFECTOR IN PHILIPPINES”, Baguio, Philippines, 3/24/97) that since DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop arrived in the Philippines Tuesday, the media has been “scrambling in packs” among various cities following “new clues and hunches” in an attempt to locate him and fellow DPRK defector Kim Duk-hong. Officials have refrained from comment given the Philippines’ “delicate” diplomatic role in Hwang’s transfer. Officials appear amused by the press hunt, with Major General Benjamin Libarnes advising reporters that “maybe you are not looking hard enough.”

2. Gore Arrival in China

John King of the Associated Press reported in the Washington Post (“GORE ARRIVES IN CHINA”, Beijing, 3/24/97) and Reuters (“GORE ARRIVES IN CHINA TO DISCUSS HUMAN RIGHTS”, Beijing, 3/24/97) reported on US Vice President Al Gore’s arrival in Beijing Monday. Gore noted his desire “to affirm the vital importance of relations between our nations and to continue building a lasting peace between China and the United States.” He added that “the landscape of US-China relations is filled with many rivers, some flowing together, others apart. Such variety befits the interaction of two great nations and civilizations.” Before departing Tokyo for Beijing, Gore noted that human rights will figure prominently on his agenda as an issue “important to us as Americans.” Gore is the highest-ranking US official to visit China since 1989. He hopes to lay the framework for a Clinton-Jiang summit in Washington later this year.

3. Gingrich Arrival in South Korea

Reuters (“GINGRICH KICKS OFF ASIAN TOUR IN SOUTH KOREA”, Seoul, 3/24/97) reported that US House of Representatives Speaker Newt Gingrich and eleven other Congressmen arrived in the ROK Monday for a three-day visit. The delegation will focus on bilateral trade issue and the situation in the DPRK. Yonsei University Professor Moon Chung-in noted that Gingrich “has picked the wrong time to come to Korea” given that the ROK “is embroiled in a domestic battle and President Kim Young-sam is entering a lame-duck stage. It’s not a good time to pressure South Korea to open its markets.” The Congressional delegation also will visit China, Japan, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

4. US Cancellation of Okinawa Drill

The Washington Post carried an Associated Press report (“US DRILL CANCELED IN OKINAWA”, Tokyo, 3/24/97) that US Marines today canceled an “unpopular” four-day live ammunition drill in Okinawa while Vice President Gore met with senior Japanese officials. However, Gore and PM Ryutaro Hashimoto offered “little in statement…to encourage Okinawans” of a reduction in the US presence. Gore noted that the United States “will continue to maintain deployed force levels in East Asia.”

5. China War Games Report

The Washington Post carried an Associated Press report (“REPORT: CHINA PLANNING WAR GAMES”, Taipei, 3/24/97) that the PRC “is threatening to stage a new round of war games” near Taiwan, according to Taiwan’s United Daily News. The Taiwan military reportedly has obtained information that the PRC is planning maneuvers for April, but is waiting to make a final decision while monitoring Taiwan behavior during the visit of the Dalai Lama. Reuters (“DALAI LAMA SAYS TAIWAN TOUR AIDS CHINA TIES”, Taipei, 3/24/97) reported that the Dalai Lama expressed hope that his visit ultimately would generate “positive indications” from the PRC.

II. Republic of Korea 03/24/97

1. Hwang Defection

An official with the Philippines’ Intelligence Agency (ISAFP), the agency responsible for Hwang Jang-yop’s security, denied reports of his having to move quarters (Joong Ang Ilbo, “SECRETARY HWANG SPENDS TIME WATCHING CABLE TV,”03/24/97”). He added the provision of security services for Hwang are not especially strenuous: “We are not going out of the way to hide Secretary Hwang, but have about 20 security agents guarding him.” The official also declared that Secretary Hwang’s stay in the Philippines will not exceed a month and added there have been no terrorist threats against Hwang so far. However, the Filipino press reported ISAFP is beefing up coastal area security in preparation for the possible incursion of a submarine from the DPRK. According to the ISAFP, Hwang is mainly spending his time watching cable TV and eating Korean food prepared by a skilled chef. A medical team is on stand-by at all hours for the 74-year-old secretary.

2. US Delegation Arrives in ROK

A US congressional delegation including House Speaker Newt Gingrich arrived here yesterday, while two more major US delegations are due to visit the ROK within the week. (Korea Times, “SPEAKER GINGRICH ARRIVES HERE FOR SECURITY TALKS,” 03/24/97) The DPRK’s volatile situation, caused by food shortages and a prolonged delay in the power succession, will be a key topic of discussion. A second group of six US Congressmen is scheduled to make an inter-Korean visit tomorrow to get information on the North’s current food shortages and discuss ways to step up the U.S. alliance with Seoul. On Friday, U.S. Vice President Al Gore arrives in Seoul along with a 124-member entourage. With a top DPRK communist party officia

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NAPSNet Daily Report 21 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. Japan

IV. Russian Federation

I. United States

1. US Food Aid to DPRK

US State Department Spokesman Nicholas Burns (“STATE DEPT. NOON BRIEFING, MARCH 20,” USIA Report, 3/21/97) told reporters during “on-the-record” discussions with reporters after his regular briefing that two US ships will deliver 27,000 metric tons of grains and foodstuffs to North Korea May 4 and May 12. The humanitarian aid is being given in response to an appeal by the World Food Program.

The Associated Press (“U.S.-KOREA FOOD AID DUE IN MAY,” Washington, 3/21/97) reported that the first shipment of a US$10 million US food aid package for the DPRK is expected to arrive May 4 at the port of Nampo. In the DPRK, the rice, corn and corn-soy blend will be delivered to officials of the World Food Program. Much of the food is intended for malnourished children under 5. The aid program was announced last month.

2. US Defense Department on Foreign Assistance

US Defense Secretary William Cohen (“DEFENSE SECRETARY COHEN ON U.S. SECURITY ASSISTANCE,” USIA Transcript, 3/21/97), in a March 20 appearance before the US House Committee on International Relations, argued that the US pursues policies of engagement around the world to ensure that diplomacy and military power act “in concert.” “Diplomacy without power,” he explained, “can produce dialogue without decision, while power without diplomacy can lead to arrogant chauvinism and senseless conflict.” In remarks during testimony to support of the Clinton administration’s request for fiscal year 1998 funding for International Military Education and Training and Foreign Military Financing programs, C

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Policy Forum 97-05: Debating the DPRK-Taiwan Nuclear Waste Deal

The recently announced deal between Taiwan and the DPRK to transport and store Taiwan’s low-level nuclear waste in the DPRK has incited a storm of protest from South Korea and has sparked controversy throughout the region. This essay by Dr. Peter Hayes, Co-Executive Director of the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development and author of numerous published works on nuclear and security issues on the Korean peninsula, departs from the largely political debate over the issue by introducing a technical dimension regarding the quantities and relative significance of the amounts of radioactive waste involved in the deal.

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NAPSNet Daily Report 20 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

III. People’s Republic of China

IV. Official Documents

I. United States

1. US Presidential Determination on KEDO Contribution

US President William Clinton (“PRESIDENTIAL DETERMINATION ON U.S. CONTRIBUTION TO KEDO,” USIA Transcript, 2/30/97) has certified to the US Congress that the United States is taking steps to assure that progress is made on the implementation of the January 1, 1992, Joint Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and the implementation of the North-South dialogue. Clinton has also certified that the DPRK is complying with the other provisions of the Agreed Framework between the DPRK and the United States. The presidential determination, dated March 18, is required under the legislation that authorizes the US contribution to the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO). The determination states that the DPRK is cooperating fully in the canning and safe storage of spent nuclear fuel and has not significantly diverted assistance provided by the United States for purposes for which it was not intended. [Ed. note: The official text of this presidential determination is included in this Daily Report in the “Official Documents” section, below.]

2. Hwang Defection

Reuters (“KOREA DEFECTOR TO STAY IN PHILIPPINES IN MARCH,” Seoul, 3/20/97) reported that a senior official of the ROK Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop will stay in the Philippines at least until the start of next month. “C

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NAPSNet Daily Report 19 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. Hwang Defection

Reuters (“RAMOS: DEFECTOR IN PHILIPPINES FOR SHORT TIME,” Manila, 3/19/97) and the Associated Press (“KOREA DEFECTOR STATUS UNCERTAIN,” Manila, 3/19/97) reported that Philippine President Fidel Ramos said on Wednesday that the Philippines had agreed to provide temporary haven to DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop, ending official silence on the question. However, Ramos, reading from a prepared statement at a news conference, said, “After consultations with concerned countries, the Philippines decided to allow the temporary stay of Mr. Hwang only for as long as necessary and as short as possible.” Blas Ople, head of the Senate foreign relations committee, said today that intelligence sources told him that Hwang and his aide would remain for two weeks. The stress on Hwang’s speedy exit apparently contradicts the PRC’s earlier request that Hwang remain for a month before flying on to Seoul. Ramos said the decision to shelter Hwang “was based on our desire to be of help to our neighbors in their need for third-country facilities and to ease tension in the Korean peninsula.” Ramos would say nothing about Hwang’s actual location or exactly when he would leave. “The security of our visitor is of paramount importance,” Ramos said. Other officials said that special presidential task force has kept Hwang in a hideaway since he arrived on Tuesday, out of fears he could be a target of DPRK assassins. Military officers said on Tuesda

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NAPSNet Daily Report 18 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. Hwang Defection

Reuters (“N.KOREAN DEFECTOR FINDS HAVEN IN PHILIPPINES,” Manila, 3/18/97) and the Associated Press (“N.KOREA DEFECTOR IN PHILIPPINES,” Manila, 3/18/97) reported that Philippine military officials, requesting not to be identified, said Tuesday that earlier in the day DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop flew from Beijing to the Philippines. At least three senior Philippine military officers confirmed that Hwang and his aide, Kim Duk-hong, arrived on a chartered Air China plane at the Clark Special Economic Zone, the site of the former US air force base north of Manila. Hwang & Kim reportedly left Seoul’s consular compound Monday night, slipped in unmarked vehicles past reporters waiting outside the tight police cordon. The two then spent the night at a military airport on the outskirts of Beijing before being flown to the southeastern port of Xiamen, where they boarded the Air China plane to Clark. After being welcomed by ROK and Philippine officials, the two were then taken by Philippine military helicopters to Baguio, a mountain resort city 125 miles north of Manila, the officials said. There was no official confirmation that Hwang had arrived in Baguio. A senior airport official at Clark said Hwang, 74, appeared healthy. The Philippine government refused to say where or for how long Hwang is expected to stay. The PRC and the ROK confirmed only that Hwang left Beijing, but neither named the destination. The PRC issued a br

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NAPSNet Daily Report 17 March, 1997

In today’s Report:

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea

I. United States

1. Hwang Defection

Reuters (“N. KOREAN DEFECTOR STILL IN BEIJING,” Beijing, 3/17/97) reported that ROK officials said on Monday that DPRK defector Hwang Jang-yop could leave as soon as this week, but that a dispute with the PRC over his initial destination was stalling a final resolution. “It could be this week, it could be next week,” ROK embassy spokesman Chang Moon-Ik said when asked when Hwang would leave Beijing. Hwang has been in the ROK consulate in Beijing since seeking asylum there February 12. According to unnamed officials in Seoul, Hwang is still expected to depart for a third country soon, once details have been arranged, and eventually to go to the ROK. One unnamed senior ROK foreign ministry official said, “Hwang Jang-yop will be able to leave China this week but his departure might not be today or tomorrow.” Reports over the weekend said that the Philippines had already agreed to allow Hwang to stop in Manila on his way to the ROK. Three vans seen driving away from Seoul’s consulate in Beijing early on Monday fueled speculation that Hwang already had been spirited out of compound. Security around the consulate was tight on Monday, including PRC police armed with assault rifles posted at approaches to the compound and backed by several armored personnel carriers and a crowd control truck. Philippine Foreign Secretary Domingo Siazon, visiting Tokyo, said he did not know if Hwang had already been moved to his country. T

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