Policy Forum 98-02: DPRK Energy Sector: Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005

NAPSNet Policy Forum

Recommended Citation

Dr. David F. Von Hippel, "Policy Forum 98-02: DPRK Energy Sector: Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005", NAPSNet Policy Forum, February 17, 1998, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-policy-forum/dprk-energy-sector-current-status-and-scenarios-for-2000-and-2005/

DPRK Energy Sector: Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005

#98-02 — February 1998

The ESENA Policy Forum Online is intended to provide expert analysis of contemporary energy, security and environmental issues in Northeast Asia, and an opportunity to participate in discussion of the analysis. The Nautilus Institute invites your responses, based either on these questions or on any other thoughts you have after reading the work. We will post selected responses on our Web site. Please send your responses to us at: esena@nautilus.org.

DPRK Energy Sector:
Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005

 

By Dr. David F. Von Hippel

 

Research Associate
and Dr. Peter Hayes
Co-Executive Director

 

 

Copyright (c) 1997-98 by Nautilus of America d/b/a
The Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development
125 University Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94710-1616 USA
Telephone: 510-204-9296 * Fax: 510-204-9298
E-mail: PHayes@nautilus.org * DVonHip@igc.org
World Wide Web: http://nautilus.org

 

Prepared for the Conference:
“Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula”
Washington, DC, September 5 and 6, 1997

Conference Organizers:

The Institute for International Economics

 

This paper has been published in “Economic Integration of the Korean Peninsula,” Special Report 10 of the Institute for International Economics (IIE), January 1998, pp. 77-111.

 

The Role of KEDO and Nuclear Power In the DPRK Energy Sector:
Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005

Introduction and Background

The actions, postures, and circumstances of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (the DPRK or North Korea) have been the focus of significant world attention over the past four years. The much-publicized problems regarding North Korea include concerns about nuclear proliferation, economic decline, ever-present security issues, energy shortages, floods, and most recently, food shortages. All of these problems have their roots in both recent and more distant Korean and world history — roots that are both deep and tangled. Various bilateral and multilateral approaches have been fashioned or proposed over the last few years to attempt to address the problems of the DPRK. The Korean Peninsula Development Organization (KEDO), for example, was created to address the politically linked problems of nuclear proliferation, electricity-sector development, and more broadly, engagement of the DPRK in cooperative projects of concern to the nations of Northeast Asia.

The goal of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the recent and current status of the DPRK energy sector, as well as some of the factors that will influence the development (or continued decline) of the sector over the next eight years and beyond. The energy sector in the DPRK has been a particular focus of the authors’ research and analytical work over the past several years.

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“DPRK Energy Sector: Current Status and Scenarios for 2000 and 2005”


nautilus-logo-smallThe NAPSNet Policy Forum provides expert analysis of contemporary peace and security issues in Northeast Asia. As always, we invite your responses to this report and hope you will take the opportunity to participate in discussion of the analysis.