NAPSNet Daily Report 21 June, 2002

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 21 June, 2002", NAPSNet Daily Report, June 21, 2002, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-21-june-2002/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. US-DPRK Talks
2. DPRK Refugees in PRC
3. ROK-DPRK Cultural Exchange
4. ROK Corruption Scandal
5. Taiwan Free Trade Pacts
6. PRC Army in Hong Kong
7. US Military in Philippines
8. US Nuclear Weapons Development
II. Republic of Korea 1. US Senate’s Resolution on Defectors
2. Defectors in ROK Mission
3. Defectors Leaving PRC
4. Inter Korea Economic Relations
III. People’s Republic of China 1. ROK-DPRK Relations
2. PRC-ROK Relations
3. PRC-DPRK Relations
4. PRC-US Relations
5. PRC-Japan Relations
6. Mystery Ship
IV. Japan 1. Japanese Armed Attack Situations Bill
2. Misuse of Personal Data by SDF
3. Diet Session Extended
4. MOX Shipment from Japan
5. Koizumi’s Visit to Okinawa

I. United States

1. US-DPRK Talks

Reuters (“U.S. SAYS WILL HAVE TALKS WITH N. KOREA IN ‘WEEKS’,” Washington, 06/21/02) reported that James Kelly, US Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian Affairs, told a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing said on Friday that the US would hold talks with the DPRK soon. Kelly stated, “We expect direct talks with North Korea to begin in a matter of weeks, not months.” Kelly said that the refugee issue was on the agenda for the proposed talks.

The Far Eastern Economic Review carried an analytical article (Murray Hiebert, “IN TWO MINDS,” Washington, 06/27/02), which said that senior US officials are still divided on how to conduct talks with the DPRK. An unnamed official stated, “There’s not so much paralysis in the government as sharp disagreement on strategy.” The official added, “When you see North Korea’s vitriol, the rush isn’t there” to make decisions. Nicholas Eberstadt of the American Enterprise Institute said that the Bush administration is divided into two camps. The first supports “hawk engagement.” The second group espouses “regime change” in the DPRK. Eberstadt added, “One reason for the hold-up on talks is that the two viewpoints have not been reconciled.” Some analysts said that US Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage and the East Asia department, including special envoy Jack Pritchard, support engagement, while Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz and Undersecretary of State for Arms Control John Bolton advocate a hard line. An unnamed senior administration official who supports engagement stated, “We’re not interested in just a deal on missiles and then having North Korea call it a breakthrough. If North Korea is serious about relations, then we need to see movement on all issues.” He said that for a thaw in US- DPRK relations, the DPRK will have to start inspections of its nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency, agree to “verifiable reductions in its conventional threat” and allow adequate monitoring of food aid. He added, “If they’re serious about improving relations, they have to get away from blackmail and using military threats to get what they want.” Victor Cha, Professor of Georgetown University, said that officials supporting hawk engagement “want to neutralize North Korea’s coercive bargaining behavior” and “give the North a stake in the status quo.” Second, they “want negotiations to build a coalition to punish North Korea” if it refuses to honor its agreements. Third, “hawks see that engagement helps bring about the regime’s demise” because “it changes the public view of the regime.” Joel Wit of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington warned, “The administration thinks time is on our side. The longer you go without talks and the less progress you make on bilateral relations, the more likely it is that North Korea will do things that hurt our society.” [Ed. Note: This article was included in the US Department of Defense’s Early Bird news service for June 21.]

2. DPRK Refugees in PRC

The Associated Press (“CHINA TO LET ASYLUM SEEKER LEAVE,” Beijing 06/21/02) reported that the PRC on Friday said that it will allow a pregnant DPRK woman hiding inside the ROK visa office in Beijing to leave for the ROK. The offer came a day after a different DPRK woman eluded security to enter the visa office, raising the number of asylum- seekers there to 21, an anonymous ROK official said Friday. He added, “They are in pretty good condition, there’s nobody who is ill or uncomfortable.” PRC Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao said his government was willing to make an exception for the pregnant woman to leave “on humanitarian grounds.”

3. ROK-DPRK Cultural Exchange

The Associated Press (“SOUTH KOREA INVITES NORTH KOREA TO ASIAN GAMES,” Seoul, 06/21/02) reported that Chung Soon-taek, chairman of the Asian Games organizing committee, sent a letter through Panmunjom on Friday inviting the DPRK to take part in the games in Pusan. Chung stated in the letter, “Let’s show the world again that we are one nation as we did in the Sydney Olympics when we entered the stadium together at the opening ceremony.” He proposed that working-level talks be held before July 15.

4. ROK Corruption Scandal

The Associated Press (“SOUTH KOREA PRESIDENT’S SON JAILED,” Seoul, 06/21/02) reported that Kim Hong-up, the second of ROK President Kim Dae-jung’s three sons, was arrested Friday on charges of receiving bribes from businessmen. In a statement, prosecutors said he received US$1.8 million in bribes from companies in exchange for using his influence in the government. President Kim in a nationally televised statement on Friday stated, “For the past months, I have felt deep regrets over failing to supervise my sons’ behavior. I feel embarrassed and guilty for hurting the hearts of the people. I again apologize.” Kim Hong-up’s lawyer, Yoo Je-in, told local media that his client admitted receiving some money from businessmen but denied it was a bribe.

5. Taiwan Free Trade Pacts

The Wall Street Journal (“CHINA WARNS ALLIES ON TAIWAN FREE-TRADE PACTS,” Beijing, 06/21/02) reported that PRC Foreign Trade Minister Shi Guangsheng on Friday warned PRC allies not to sign free-trade agreements with Taiwan. Shi said that the PRC would consider free-trade agreements with Taiwan a breach of the “one-China” policy. He stated, “If such countries sign free-trade agreements with the Taiwan authorities, they are bound to bring political trouble to themselves.” In Taipei, Taiwan Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Chang Siao-yue called the comments an attempt to politicize a purely economic issue. Chang stated, “We hope that China doesn’t bring politics into everything.”

6. PRC Army in Hong Kong

The Associated Press (“ARMY CHIEF WORRIES ABOUT TROOPS,” Hong Kong, 06/21/02) reported that PRC Lieutenant General Xiong Ziren, commander in chief of the Hong Kong garrison of the People’s Liberation Army, expressed concern about corrupting influences on his soldiers. Xiong wrote in the June issue of the Communist Party journal Qiushi, “Various rival powers inside and outside the country are taking every opportunity to erode, seek favor with, or to involve army personnel in subversive activities.” He said that it was a challenge to maintain his troops’ loyalty for the Communist Party while they were surrounded by capitalism. He added, “Since Hong Kong was politically separated from the motherland for over 100 years, and has been under the British colonial education for a long time, also because of the libelous attacks from anti-China and extreme rightist forces, most Hong Kong people don’t understand the army and holds various degrees of prejudice.”

7. US Military in Philippines

The Washington Post (Bradley Graham, “U.S. ADVISERS IN — AND OUT,” 06/20/02, A15) reported that US defense officials said Thursday that the US government will not press for extending US Special Forces operations in the southern Philippines beyond the scheduled expiration on July 31. Officials said that only a small US military contingent would remain in the Philippines after the troops withdraw. They added that US President George W. Bush has left open the possibility of extending lower-level counterterrorism training if the Philippine government requests it, but one unnamed defense official stated, “The feeling is this can be done through our normal security assistance program. It won’t require large numbers of boots on the ground advising Philippine troops.” Another unnamed official stated, “The administration’s war on terrorism provided a timely rationale for getting more deeply engaged in the Philippines, which is something [retired US Admiral Dennis] Blair and others had wanted to do.” Derek J. Mitchell, a specialist on Asian affairs at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, stated, “The Abu Sayyaf link [to Al Qaeda] was always very tenuous. It was always a convenient excuse to come to the aid of an important ally in need.” An unnamed Senate staff member argued, “This has not been about striking a blow in the war on terrorism. This has been about helping a treaty ally that has a real security problem and that certainly needs counterinsurgency assistance. But if the underlying U.S. aim is to enhance the Philippine government’s ability to deal with a variety of threats, then we’re talking about a much longer U.S. commitment.”

The Associated Press (Oliver Teves, “ABU SAYYAF LEADER BELIEVED KILLED,” Zamboanga, 06/21/02) reported that Philippines President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo said Friday that Abu Sabaya, the most visible of Abu Sayyaf’s commanders, was shot in a clash with US-trained troops on Friday and may be dead. Navy personnel were searching the waters off southern Mindanao island for the body of Sabaya. Major Richard Sater, a spokesman for US forces, stated, “We did get word from the (Philippine military) that Abu Sabaya was one of those killed in the encounter. We are encouraged. It is a step forward in the war against terrorism.” Sater said that US troops provided unspecified support during the clash but were not directly involved in the fighting. [Ed. Note: This article was included in the US Department of Defense’s Early Bird news service for June 21.]

8. US Nuclear Weapons Development

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Jonathan S. Landay, “NEW NUCLEAR ARMS FOR NEW TARGETS?,” Washington, 06/21/02) reported that the US Department of Energy wants teams of experts to study whether existing nuclear warheads could be modified to hit underground bunkers in places like the DPRK. Working with the Defense Department and the military, these “advanced warhead concept teams” would also design warheads and conduct tests of components short of full-scale, underground blasts. The President George W. Bush administration also wants to look at ways to cut the time needed to restart underground nuclear tests if they are needed to ensure the reliability of the nuclear arsenal. The administration has proposed a US$15.5 million study to determine whether two existing warheads – the B83 and B61 thermonuclear gravity bombs – could be turned into nuclear bunker-busters. The House of Representatives approved the study of the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator, or RNEP, in the 2003 Defense Department budget that it passed last month, but Democrats in the Senate are expected to pass a budget that would require Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham to submit a study justifying the need for the RNEP and telling how it would be used, the kinds of targets it would attack, and whether conventional weapons could be used instead. The measure would also require the Energy Department to win congressional approval for the research and development phases of such programs and then seek permission to begin producing modified or new nuclear warheads. [Ed. Note: This article was included in the US Department of Defense’s Early Bird news service for June 21.]

II. Republic of Korea

1. US Senate’s Resolution on Defectors

Chosun Ilbo (Joo Yong-jung, “US SENATE JOINS HOUSE RESOLUTION NK REFUGEES, Washington, 06/21/02) reported that members of the US Senate followed the House of Representatives unanimously, Thursday (KST) in calling for a resolution urging the PRC government to allow safe passage for DPRK refugees and to cease repatriating them. The Senate did not rely on ballots, but voice votes for a unanimous decision in urging the PRC to cease the forced repatriation of refugees escaping from starvation and political persecution, and to respect the duties of the UN Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. The Senate also requested serious efforts to be made to confirm the identities of DPRK refugees caught by the public authorities and to protect them, including giving them fair opportunities to request asylum. It said that the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) should be allowed to approach all DPRK defectors in PRC.

2. Defectors in ROK Mission

Chosun Ilbo (Kwon Kyeong-bok, “NO SOLUTION IN SIHGT FOR NK DEFECTORS,” Seoul, 06/21/02) reported that an ROK government source stated Thursday that the ROK was prepared to hand over 20 DPRK defectors to PRC authorities providing it received guarantees they would be allowed to proceed to ROK afterwards. He said this modification of the government’s stance was due to the advanced state of the pregnancy of one of the refugees, noting that urgent humanitarian treatment came before investigating the PRC’s breach of ROK sovereignty, when security guards dragged a defector out of the Consulate General. However, he continued that the PRC’s demand for the ROK to proclaim that it would not accept any more DPRK defectors was completely unacceptable. Meanwhile an official said that Park Su-gil, the ROK member of the UN Subcommittee on Human Rights, would deliver a resolution regarding DPRK defectors in the PRC to a meeting to be held in Geneva from July 29 to August 16.

3. Defectors Leaving PRC

Chosun Ilbo (Yeo Shi-dong, “DEFECTORS MAY BE ALLOWED OUT OF CHINA,” Beijing, 06/21/02) reported that a diplomatic source indicated Thursday that the 20 DPRK defectors in the ROK Consulate General in Beijing are likely to be allowed to go to the ROK through a third country. PRC Foreign Ministry Spokesman Liu Jianchao told foreign journalists that the defectors would be treated according to the fundamental interests of the PRC.

4. Inter Korea Economic Relations

The Korea Herald (“INTER-KOREAN TRADE UP 7.9% THIS YEAR,” Seoul, 06/21/02) reported that inter-Korean trade from January to May totaled US$186.22 million, up 7.9 percent from the US$172.62 million recorded in the same period last year, the ROK Unification Ministry said Thursday. The ROK imported US$80.65 million worth of goods from DPRK in the period, mostly agro-fisheries and metal products and textiles, and it shipped US$105.70 million in items to DPRK, mainly chemical and textile products. The figures include US$88.53 million in non-trade goods, such as US$24.88 million in supplies for the two light-water reactors being built in the DPRK and US$2.29 million for the inter-Korean Mt. Kumgang tourism project, the official said.

III. People’s Republic of China

1. ROK-DPRK Relations

China Daily (“WORKERS TO TRAIN IN ROK,” Seoul, 06/18/02, P11) reported that the ROK’s power monopoly said on June 17 that about 300 power engineers from the DPRK are to be trained in the ROK on operating nuclear plants as part of the light-water reactor project being run by the Korean Peninsular Energy Development Organization (KEDO). A spokesman for the ROK state-run Korea Electric Power Corp (KEPCO) said that KEPCO would conduct the training from November until the end of 2004. According to the spokesman, KEPCO, whose nuclear power generation covers 40 percent of the ROK’s total power consumption, is building the reactors in the form of a turnkey project. Besides, it reported that the ROK presidential Blue House said on June 17 that ROK President Kim Dae-jung’s top foreign policy and security adviser will visit Washington this week for talks on the DPRK.

People’s Daily (Gao Haorong, “KIM DAE-JUNE HOPES DPRK-US DIALOGUES RESUME,” Seoul, 06/16/02, P3) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung on June 15 in Seoul expressed his hope that the DPRK and the US will re- start dialogue soon and that the relationship between the ROK and the DPRK will take a favorable turn. Kim made the remarks when attending an activity at the presidential Blue House to mark the second anniversary of the issue of the joint declaration, said the report. Kim said that the ROK-DPRK summit held two years ago relaxed the tension on Korean Peninsula, started the cooperation between the two sides and became a chance for the ROK and the DPRK to explore common ground on the reunification issue. Kim said that after nearly one year’s consideration, US President George W. Bush has decided to dialogue with the DPRK and that the US was preparing for the dialogue. Kim hopes that the dialogue will be resumed soon, said the report.

China Daily (“ROK URGES RESUMPTION OF TALKS ON ANNIVERSARY,” Seoul, 06/15-16/02, P8) reported that on the eve of the second anniversary of a historic summit accord, the ROK on June 15 urged the DPRK to revive stalled talks aimed at resuming the reconciliation process on the Korean Peninsula. In a letter sent to the DPRK, it reported that ROK Unification Minister Jeong Se-hyun said that both sides must hold a round of economic talks that were cancelled last month.

2. PRC-ROK Relations

China Daily (Shao Zongwei, “TALKS ON ‘TRESPASSERS’ GO ON,” 06/21/02, P1) reported that PRC Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao said on June 20 that consultations are continuing between the PRC and the embassies of the ROK and Canada concerning “trespassers.” At a regular briefing, Liu said that a deputy director of the Foreign Ministry’s Department of Consular Affairs and an official from the ROK Embassy held talks in Beijing in an attempt to resolve the issue. Liu did not give details of the consultation but said that no consensus had been reached yet. The report said that a notice issued by the PRC Foreign Ministry last week asked foreign embassies and consulates in the PRC to notify the ministry’s Department of Consular Affairs of “trespassers” and hand them over to PRC police.

China Daily (Xiao Shao, “FM CALLS FOR CALM OVER TRESPASSING,” 06/20/02, P1) reported that PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan on June 19 called for “calmness and restraint” regarding the issue of trespassers on the grounds of the ROK Embassy in China. It reported that a press release from the PRC Foreign Ministry quoted Tang as saying that it is important that both the PRC and the ROK remain calm, and work towards the resolution of the issue with the correct attitude. Tang said this during a meeting with his ROK counterpart Choi Sung-hong in Cha-am, Thailand on the sidelines of the first Asian Cooperation Dialogue (ACD) meeting held on June 18-19. According to the PRC Foreign Ministry release, Tang hopes that the ROK side understands that the PRC will not allow foreign diplomatic institutions on Chinese soil to serve as channels for illegal entrance and exit of the country. Tang agreed that the two sides should keep working-level contacts so as to resolve the issue at an early date and prevent similar incidents from happening again, said the report. The release said that Choi also hoped for the early resolution of the issue through friendly consultations.

3. PRC-DPRK Relations

People’s Daily (Zhao Jiaming, “CHINA, DPRK SIGN MARINE TRANSPORT AGREEMENT,” Pyongyang, 06/15/02, P3) reported that an agreement on marine transport was signed between the governments of the DPRK and China in Pyongyang on June 14. Chief of Staff Ra Dong-hui of the DPRK Ministry of Land and Marine Transport and vice minister Hu Xijie of the PRC Ministry of Transportation signed the agreement, said the report. It said that present at the signing ceremony were Kim Yong-il, DPRK minister of land and marine transport, officials concerned and members of the delegation of the PRC Ministry of Transportation led by Hu Xijie and PRC ambassador to the DPRK Wu Donghe. It said that Kim Yong-il spoke highly of the agreement. He said the agreement will benefit the economic development of the two countries and promote traditional friendship between the DPRK and the PRC. He hopes the transportation departments of the two countries will strengthen their cooperation and exchanges.

4. PRC-US Relations

People’s Daily (“CHINESE VICE FM TO VISIT US,” Beijing, 06/21/02, P4) reported that PRC Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao said at a regular briefing on June 20 that at the invitation of the US State Department, PRC Vice Foreign Minister Wang Yi will pay a visit to the US on June 22. During the visit, Liu said, the two sides will exchange views on the situation in Asia and make policy consultations on international issues of common concern.

5. PRC-Japan Relations

People’s Daily (Huang Heng & Yang Jingchuan, “CHINESE FM MEETS JAPANESE COUNTERPART,” Cha-am, 06/20/02, P3) reported that PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan met his Japanese counterpart Yoriko Kawaguchi in Cha-am, Thailand, on June 19 during the first Asian Cooperation Dialogue Cooperation (ACD) meeting. At the meeting, the report said that both sides agreed that this year will mark the 30th anniversary of the normalization of PRC-Japan diplomatic ties, which could be a good opportunity for enhancing mutual understanding and friendship between the two peoples. Tang noted that the two countries need to have a correct understanding on the current problems affecting bilateral ties and try to solve it properly. Regarding the recent incident at the Japanese Consulate in Shenyang, China, Tang reiterated the PRC’s positions over the matter. He pointed out that the basic facts of the incident are very clear and the two countries should keep a cool mind and enhance dialogue, avoiding further escalation of similar incidents. Kawaguchi agreed with Tang that the two countries should keep the good general conditions in bilateral ties and must prevent similar incidents from happening again. The two sides also agreed to begin negotiation on signing a bilateral consulate pact, said the report.

6. Mystery Ship

People’s Daily (“JAPAN ALLOWED TO SALVAGE SHIP,” Beijing, 06/19/02, P4) reported that PRC Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao said at a regular press conference in Beijing on June 18 that the PRC has approved Japan’s request to salvage a sunken boat in the East China Sea. Liu said that since the beginning of June, Japan had requested the PRC’s permission to salvage the boat and the two sides had been in negotiations. Japan acknowledged that the PRC had sovereignty and administrative jurisdiction of the exclusive economic zone and had made explanations and commitments to the PRC on issues of great concern. In this way, Liu said, the PRC decided to approve Japan’s request in accordance with the PRC law on marine transportation security, law on marine environmental protection and other related laws. He said that the PRC will monitor the procedure of the salvage under the international law and other domestic rules and laws. The Japanese side made several commitments, said Liu, adding that Japan had promised to cooperate with PRC monitoring boats during the process and to take measures to ensure that the salvage operation would not cause pollution. He said that Japan would inform the PRC of the salvage process and investigation results. After the operation, all Japanese boats would withdraw from the area, according to Liu. The Japanese side would also make a serious study and give a serious reply as early as possible to the PRC in respect of compensation to the Chinese side, said the spokesman.

IV. Japan

1. Japanese Armed Attack Situations Bill

The Asahi Shimbun (“MILITARY BILLS PUT OFF UNTIL NEXT DIET SESSION,” Tokyo, 06/14/02) reported that the Japanese government and ruling coalition parties have given up on passing a package of bills to prepare Japan for a foreign military attack. Instead, they want to set up a consultative committee with opposition parties to negotiate possible revisions and have the bills ready for passage in the next Diet session, the sources said. Mikio Aoki, leader of the Liberal Democratic Party’s Upper House caucus, said that the emergency bills would face difficulty clearing the chamber even if the ruling coalition forced them through the Lower House. In addition, a Lower House special committee deliberating on the bills will likely be wrapped up with the recent scandal involving Defense Agency lists containing details of citizens seeking information disclosure.

2. Misuse of Personal Data by SDF

The Asahi Shimbun (“NAKATANI UNVEILS PUNISHMENT,” Tokyo, 06/21/02) reported that a senior Japan Defense Agency bureaucrat was among 29 people disciplined Thursday over the agency’s background checks into people exercising their lawful right to request information. Kyoji Yanagisawa, the director-general of the ministry’s secretariat, will be demoted to counselor, and see his pay cut by one-tenth for two months, agency chief Gen Nakatani said at a news conference Thursday. Hironori Kanazawa, who heads the documents department, will also be demoted. The unidentified Maritime Self-Defense Force lieutenant commander whose list of information seekers first touched off the scandal in May will have his salary cut by one-fifth for one month. Yasunari Ito, the agency’s top bureaucrat, meanwhile, apparently offered to resign his post to take responsibility for the scandal but was persuaded by Nakatani to stay on. Instead, his pay was cut by one-fifth for two months. Nakatani and three other political appointees who run the Defense Agency, however, all agreed to return a portion of their salaries. Nakatani will return one-fifth of two months’ salary, and his deputy, Kyogon Hagiyama, will return one-tenth of two months’ salary.

3. Diet Session Extended

The Japan Times (“DIET SESSION TO CONTINUE UNTIL JULY 31,” Tokyo, 06/20/02) reported that the House of Representatives decided Wednesday to extend the current 150-day Diet session by 42 days to July 31 to give the ruling bloc more time to pass key bills. Lawmakers from the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), New Komeito and the New Conservative Party approved the extension by a majority vote. The Democratic Party of Japan voted against the proposal, while the other three opposition parties — the Liberal Party, the Japanese Communist Party and the Social Democratic Party — boycotted the vote. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who also heads the LDP, pursued the extension to conduct further debate on key bills. These include medical reform measures and a package of bills related to the deregulation of postal services. Other major bills concern emergency attack-response measures and protection of personal information.

4. MOX Shipment from Japan

Kyodo (“FIRST MOX RETRIEVAL SHIP ARRIVES IN JAPAN,” Takahama, 06/15/02) reported that one of two ships that will transport a load of controversial plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel back to Britain arrived on June 14 at a port used by a nuclear reactor in Takahama, Fukui Prefecture. The Pacific Pintail will transport the MOX fuel, currently stored at Kansai Electric Power Co.’s (KEPCO) Takahama nuclear plant, back to British Nuclear Fuels PLC (BNFL), the UK firm that manufactured it, in early July, sources familiar with the shipping plan said. The other ship, the Pacific Teal, has not yet arrived. At Takahama port, the MOX fuel will be loaded onto the ships after Land, Infrastructure and Transport Ministry officials have measured radiation levels and determined that everything is in order. While neither the security authorities nor KEPCO are disclosing the route due to security concerns, several coastal countries, including Chile, and environment groups strongly object to the planned shipment.

5. Koizumi’s Visit to Okinawa

The Japan Times (“KOIZUMI TO ATTEND MEMORIAL SERVICE IN OKINAWA,” 06/20/02) reported that Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi will attend a war memorial service this weekend in Okinawa, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda said Wednesday. Sunday marks the 57th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Okinawa, the only ground battle fought on Japanese soil during World War II. Also in attendance will be Koji Omi, state minister in charge of Okinawa affairs, welfare minister Chikara Sakaguchi, House of Representatives Speaker Tamisuke Watanuki and House of Councilors President Hiroyuki Kurata. Last month, he attended a ceremony in Okinawa to mark the 30th anniversary of Okinawa’s reversion to Japanese control in 1972, after 27 years of US rule.

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Tokyo, Japan

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Peter Razvin: icipu@online.ru
Moscow, Russian Federation

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Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

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