NAPSNet Daily Report 13 June, 2000

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 13 June, 2000", NAPSNet Daily Report, June 13, 2000, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-13-june-2000/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. ROK-DPRK Summit
2. Analysis of Summit
3. Proposals at Inter-Korean Summit
4. Kim Dae-jung’s Summit Speech
5. DPRK Refugees in PRC
6. DPRK Famine
7. DPRK Drought
8. Effect of Summit on Cross-Straits Relations
9. Cross-Straits Talks
II. Republic of Korea 1. Kim Dae-jung Arrives in Pyongyang
2. Inter-Korean Summit
3. Inter-Korean Summit Delayed
4. Analysts Views on Inter-Korean Summit
5. Separated Families
6. Inter-Korean National Assembly Talks
7. Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation
8. Inter-Korean Cooperation on Sports
9. Inter-Korean Exchange on Weather Information
10. Web Sites
11. Remains of US Soldiers in the ROK
12. Putin’s Visit to the DPRK
13. Russia-DPRK Goodwill Association’s Visit to ROK

I. United States

1. ROK-DPRK Summit

The Washington Post (Doug Struck, “2 KOREAN LEADERS COME TOGETHER AT HISTORIC SUMMIT,” Seoul, 6/13/00) reported that DRPK leader Kim Jong-il and ROK leader Kim Dae-jung met in the DPRK capital Tuesday for the three day inter-Korean summit. Kim Jong-il unexpectedly arrived at the Pyongyang airport Tuesday morning to greet Kim Dae-jung. The two leaders met at the Baekhwawon State Guest House. Before leaving for the DPRK, Kim Dae-jung said, “the people of Korea and the world are looking at the summit to congratulate us. I expect peace and cooperation are expected to come out of this summit.” He also said he hopes to host Kim Jong-il for another meeting in Seoul. Kim Dae-jung’s aides said they hope the three day summit will be the start of regular exchanges between DPRK and the ROK that will expand on symbolism that is likely to be the chief result of this trip. Kim Dae-jung said he would focus in his summit conversations on “the matters that we can agree on easily.” Kim Dae Jung will return to the ROK by car on June 15 across the Demilitarized Zone.

The Associated Press (Christopher Torchia, “NORTH, SOUTH KOREAN LEADERS MEET,” Seoul, 6/13/00) and The Washington Times (Edward Neilan, “KOREAN SUMMIT BEGINS,” Seoul, 06/13/00) reported that ROK president Kim Dae-jung pledged on the first day of the inter-Korean summit on Tuesday to work toward eventual reunification of the divided Korean Peninsula, while DPRK leader Kim Jong-il said he was ready to open a “dialogue without reserve.” Upon greeting Kim Dae-jung at the Pyongyang airport, Kim Jong- il said, “the world is closely watching us. Why President Kim came to North Korea and why I accepted is a question mark. We have to give the answer to this question during the two nights and three days. I ask not only President Kim but also (accompanying) ministers to make contributions to this.” US White House press secretary Joe Lockhart underscored the importance of the summit, saying that the US was “heartened to see the warm welcome that Kim Dae-jung received.” Saying he didn’t want to speculate about what, if any, concrete results would come out of the meeting, Lockhart added, “It’s obviously … an important part of the process that they have been brought together in this forum to have discussions directly.” At the DPRK’s main state guesthouse, Kim Jong-il explained the DPRK’s approach to the summit, saying, “We were unable to publicize your visit through newspapers and the radio because of security. In the South, things may work out well if you advertise them, but we will be all right if we pursue only the substance.” In another exchange, Kim Jong-il said, “I am convinced that all problems will be resolved.” Kim Dae-jung replied, “I agree. From now, we must talk directly.” The evening’s banquet was hosted by Kim Yong-nam, chairman of the presidium of the Supreme People’s Assembly.

2. Analysis of Summit

The New York Times (Howard W. French, “SEOUL LEADER ARRIVES IN NORTH KOREA FOR LONG-AWAITED MEETING,” Seoul, 06/13/00) reported that an unnamed ROK government official said that Kim Jong-il’s appearance at the airport, “was something we were not expecting at all. It is a very good sign.” Nicholas Eberstadt at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington stated, “All of the major players at the moment perceive their interests in immediate terms: wanting to have more stability on the peninsula, and kicking problems down the road. The United States, South Korea and Japan are all very vested in the Perry process, which is actually a kind of American version of President Kim’s Sunshine Policy.” He added that the PRC has been gaining the most from this approach. He stated, “China has a divided Korea, with two governments both vying for Beijing’s affection. And all of the Pacific powers are soliciting China’s cooperation over North Korea, including Washington.”

3. Proposals at Inter-Korean Summit

Reuters (“S.KOREA’S KIM LOOKS TO BUILD ON WARM SUMMIT START,” Pyongyang, 06/13/2000) and the Associated Press (“LEADERS OF TWO KOREAS PLEDGE OPEN DISCUSSION OF THEIR DIFFERENCES,” Seoul, 06/13/00) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung in a banquet speech Tuesday at the end of a first day of talks emphasized the need to allow reunions of separated families. Kim stated, “Many of the family members are passing away due to their advanced age; we have to attend to their life-long wishes.” Kim added that he was tremendously moved by the welcome he received, especially as he had not expected to be able to make a visit to the DPRK so soon. Kim Jong-il replied, “I will try not to be too proud. And you will not be disappointed.” Kim Dae-jung proposed reopening road and rail connections and opening new sea lanes and air routes. He stated, “When that happens, all Koreans will be able to travel freely between the two sides and work toward reconciliation, cooperation and eventual reunification.” Kim Jong-il urged a “dialogue without reserve.” Pyongyang’s Central TV reported, “The vast airport and streets of Pyongyang burned with emotions because so many people turned out to see our Great Leader Kim Jong Il.”

Channel NewsAsia (“SOUTH KOREAN PRESIDENT KIM CALLS FOR RECONCILIATION BETWEEN TWO KOREAS,” 6/14/00) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-Jung made his first major speech since arriving in the DPRK capital of Pyongyang on Tuesday. At a banquet ending the first day of the DPRK-ROK summit, ROK Kim declared his earnest hope that half a century of distrust and confrontation would turn into reconciliation and cooperation. Earlier on Tuesday, the two leaders agreed to make their landmark meeting a success. ROK media reports quoted both as saying during their talks at the State Guest House that they hoped their meeting would leave a good precedent for the “future” on settling outstanding issues. ROK’s Deputy Unification Minister said that the two leaders discussed issues concerning national reconciliation and peace.

4. Kim Dae-jung’s Summit Speech

Agence France Presse released the full text of ROK president Kim Dae- jung’s DPRK summit statement upon arrival in Pyongyang on Tuesday (Pyongyang, 6/13/00) which said, “Honorable citizens of Pyongyang and North Korea. I am truly glad to meet you. I came here because I wanted to meet you. I came here because I wanted to see the mountains and rivers of the North that I have yearned to see in my dreams. It has been too long. I have finally come after going around and about over that long period of time. It was not just once or twice that I plunged into deep despair thinking that I could never step on the soil of the North in my lifetime. But now, I have attained my lifelong wish. The 70 million Korean people in the South and North are also ardently hoping to attain their wish as soon as possible. More than anything, I wholeheartedly thank Chairman Kim Jong-Il for inviting me and my delegation. I also thank all of you who are welcoming us so warmly like this. And I convey warm greetings from your compatriots in the South. As president of the South, I came to Pyongyang to lead the effort for peace, cooperation and unification in accordance with the will of your compatriots in the South. I believe the expectations that our compatriots in the North have in the summit between Chairman Kim Jong-il and I, are as great as those of your compatriots in the South. This is just the beginning. Since the inter- Korean summit, which was just a dream, is now reality, we will solve problems one at a time. Together with Chairman Kim Jong-il, I will give my all in searching for ways for all Koreans in the South and North to live peacefully and lead a better life. Honorable citizens of Pyongyang and North Korea. We will not be able to resolve all at once the bitterness that has accumulated over the past half century. But well begun is half done. I wholeheartedly hope that all the Korean people will have hopes for reconciliation, cooperation and peaceful unification on account of my visit to Pyongyang. We will do our utmost to resolve the problems that can be solved one at a time. We will surely solve those issues that we do not solve this time by meeting for the second and third time. I hope that the citizens of Pyongyang and North Korea will give Chairman Kim Jong-il and me strong support and encouragement. Compatriots of the North. We are one people. We share the same fate. Let us hold hands firmly. I love you all. Thank you.”

5. DPRK Refugees in PRC

Reuters (Paul Eckert, “N.KOREA OPENING NO DRAW FOR SCARED EXILES,” Tumen, 6/12/00) reported that DPRK refugees in the PRC said that it will take a lot more than DRPK’s recent tentative opening before they will go back. One 45-year-old refugee who has lived in the PRC since last year stated, “If I am caught, I have resolved to kill myself and I carry a cyanide tablet all the time. There would be no reason at all to live.” A 60- year-old widow whose husband starved to death said that the summit might bring the two Koreas closer, “But it’s hard to see life in North Korea getting much better any time soon. It will take a change of economic policy in North Korea, and probably a new political system, before I can go back.” She added that the government had told people that the UN, acting on US orders, was withholding food aid to the DPRK.

6. DPRK Famine

The New York Times (Elisabeth Rosenthal, “FAMINE IN NORTH KOREA CREATES STEADY HUMAN FLOW INTO CHINA,” Tumen 6/10/00) reported that private relief groups working on the border with the PRC get requests for food and medical help from towns, schools and even labor camps deep inside the DPRK. The article added that DPRK refugees in the PRC who have enough money can send for their relatives to join them. An unnamed Western scholar stated, “The people who have survived this far have done so because they are physiologically hearty and also because they have developed coping mechanisms.” The scholar added, “The statistics can look great, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that there is more to eat.” According to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health that is soon to be published by the National Academy of Sciences, deaths peaked at about 50 per 1,000 population in 1996 and 1997 and are about half that now. The study also found that more than half of DPRK refugees in 1995 said that government-supplied grain was their family’s primary source of food, while two years later the proportion was 3.9 percent. At a recent news conference in Geneva, David Morton, the World Food Program’s (WFP) representative in the DPRK, noted “a slight improvement” in food supplies and harvests over all, but said that certain groups and areas were “still very, very short of food.” He added, “We see very little result from all that effort that [relief agencies] put in, whether it’s planting food or trees or working in the towns and the cities.” One study, co-sponsored by WFP, found that longstanding malnutrition had left 62 percent of DPRK children small for their age.

7. DPRK Drought

Agence France Presse (“KOREAN SUMMIT TO GO AHEAD AMID NEW DROUGHT IN NORTH,” Seoul, 6/10/00) reported that the DPRK’s state-controlled media admitted that some rivers and reservoirs have run dry and that rice planting has been suspended in many areas. However, analysts said that DPRK leader Kim Jong-il would be too embarrassed to ask for help during the inter-Korean summit because it would put him in a position of weakness toward ROK President Kim Dae-jung. Food supplies were said to have improved over the past six months, but that DPRK’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said last week that drought and high temperatures were again hitting all parts of the DPRK. KCNA said that drought had persisted for several months with rainfall in some areas at 20-30 percent of normal levels. The report said there was no letup in sight, so, “in consequence, much less water than average years is stored in reservoirs and some of them are completely dried up and no water is to be seen in rivers and streams.”

8. Effect of Summit on Cross-Straits Relations

Agence France Presse (“TAIWAN SAYS KOREAN SUMMIT A MODEL BUT CHINA DISAGREES,” Taipei, 6/13/00) reported that Taiwan lawmakers and media said on Tuesday that Taiwan and the PRC should be inspired by the inter- Korean summit to improve their relations. Lin Cheng-tse, a lawmaker from Taiwan’s Kuomintang (KMT), said, “Leaders from the two sides of the Taiwan Straits should learn from the two Koreas.” Lai Shih-pao, a Taiwanese parliamentarian with the pro-reunification New Party wrote in a commentary in Taiwan’s China Post, “I’m wondering if the two sides can deliver olive branches to each other? For instance, can Beijing stop wargames targeting Taiwan?” PRC foreign ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao dismissed suggestions that the German and Korean models for reunification were relevant to the issue of Taiwan. Zhu said, “the purpose of applying the German model or the Korean model to handle cross strait relations, is to resist reunification.” Zhu said the model was inappropriate because the international community recognized both the former West and East Germany and the DPRK and the ROK as sovereign countries, whereas Taiwan was only recognized by a few countries. Zhu called on the Taiwan authorities to “size up the situation clearly and return to the ‘One China’ principle as soon as possible.”

9. Cross-Straits Talks

Agence France Presse (“TAIWAN ASKS U.S. TO HELP RESUMPTION OF TALKS WITH CHINA,” Taipei, 6/13/00) reported that Taiwan President Chen Shui-bian called on June 12 for the US to play a more active role in helping restart talks with the PRC before the year’s end. Chen said he had been sincere in his efforts to resolve the deadlock between Taiwan and the PRC over the “one-China” principal in his inaugural speech on May 20. Chen said in his meeting with US Senator John Rockefeller, “Our goal is to reopen negotiations. But the biggest stumbling block is not with Taiwan but with the Chinese communists who have failed to show identical sincerity and goodwill.” He asked Rockefeller to pass on his suggestion to the US that “the U.S. would play a more active role so that the Koo (Chen-fu)-Wang (Daohan) talks could be restored this year.”

II. Republic of Korea

1. Kim Dae-jung Arrives in Pyongyang

Joongang Ilbo (Choi Hoon, “KIM JONG-IL MAKES EXTRAORDINARY DEBUT TO WESTERN WORLD,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) and Chosun Ilbo (Kim Min-bai, “PRESIDENT GREETED BY KIM JONG-IL AT SUNAN AIRPORT,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung arrived at Sunan airport near Pyongyang on Tuesday morning. Kim Dae-jung and First Lady Lee Hee-ho arrived in Pyongyang at 10:20am and were greeted at the airport by the DPRK’s leader Defense Committee Chairman Kim Jong-il in person. Kim Dae- jung gave a smile upon seeing Kim Jong-il out in front of the airplane ramps, and conveyed the first greeting, “Glad to meet you. I wanted to see you.” Chairman Kim, with a smile, also shook hands with President Kim. There was no artillery salute and neither countries’ national anthem were played. The two leaders traveled together in the same car and effectively held a private summit meeting as they rode towards the Baekhwawon State Guest House. The two Kims spoke for a further 25 minutes at Baekhwawon along with their accompanying staff as they exchanged official greetings.

2. Inter-Korean Summit

Joongang Ilbo (“PRESIDENT KIM PROPOSES SOUTH-NORTH HOTLINE,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) and Chosun Ilbo (“TWO KIMS AGREE TO ESTABLISH HOT LINE,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung and DPRK National Defense Committee Chairman Kim Jong-il held their first summit meeting at the Baekhwawon Guesthouse in Pyongyang, sharing views on measures of cooperation and exchange between the ROK and the DPRK. The two Kims were close to reaching an agreement on establishing an inter- Korea hotline, and stated, “Let’s settle all inter-Korea problems with direct conversation through the hotline.” They also confirmed that they would talk again on June 14, and agreed to speak candidly on inter-Korean issues during President Kim’s stay in Pyongyang.

Chosun Ilbo (“TWO KIMS AGREE TO ESTABLISH HOT LINE,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that in the afternoon ROK President Kim Dae-jung and ROK Ministers of Unification (MOU) Park Jae-kyu, Finance and Economy (MOFE) Lee Hun-jai, Culture and Tourism (MCT) Park Jie-won, and chief presidential secretary Han Kwang-ok were presented to Kim Yong-nam, chairman of the DPRK’s Supreme People’s Assembly at the Mansudae Assembly Hall. They later watched a performance at the Mansudae Arts Theater and in the evening Kim Yong-nam hosted a reception for Kim Dae-jung and his party.

3. Inter-Korean Summit Delayed

The Korea Times (Lee Chang-sup, “S-N SUMMIT DELAYED BY ONE DAY,” Seoul, 06/12/00), the Korea Herald (Chon Shi-yong, “INTER-KOREAN SUMMIT DELAYED BY ONE DAY,” Seoul, 06/12/00), Chosun Ilbo (Choi Joon-seok, “SUMMIT DELAYED FOR TWENTY-FOUR HOURS,” Seoul, 06/11/00) reported that ROK Presidential spokesman Park Joon-young announced on Sunday that the DPRK had asked in an urgent phone-call Saturday for a twenty-four hour delay of the Summit Meeting. Park said that the DPRK requested the delay for technical reasons and the ROK government had accepted the request. Park ruled out the possibility of any further delays to the summit, and stressed that the postponement would not affect the “main framework” of ROK President Kim Dae-jung’s visit or his itinerary. According to an unnamed government official, the DPRK is readjusting the whole schedule from security aspects as the ROK media has disclosed too much of the agenda for the meetings. The official added that the DPRK is used to announcing the visit of foreign leaders after the event has take place. ROK Minister of Unification (MOU) Park Jae-kyu confirmed that the delay would not affect the agenda, and the delay was to ensure that the visit went through foolproof. Park stated that the request was accepted due to the unique circumstances surrounding the two Korea’s relations. The ROK’s Grand National Party (GNP) issued a statement saying that the move was unheard of diplomatically and an insult to the ROK, criticizing the government’s lack of preparedness. GNP spokesman Kwon Chul-hyun said that the DPRK is probably delaying the meeting because back stage dealing is underway and it wanted to get more concessions on top of the 200,000 tons of fertilizer provided.

4. Analysts Views on Inter-Korean Summit

Chosun Ilbo (Choi Byong-mook, “DAY ONE OF THE SUMMIT REVEALS MANY SURPRISES,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that there are mixed reactions from analysts and experts in the ROK. Unnamed officials from the ROK Ministry of Unification (MOU) said that the fact that the DPRK leader Kim Jong-il had gone beyond normal levels of diplomatic courtesy was an extremely positive sign and bodes well for the talks. According to some analysts, the moves would appear to show a willingness for the DPRK to open up. However, other analysts said that the actions are a show and that the DPRK will still demand the withdrawal of US forces and the scrapping of the ROK’s National Security Law. They cited that the DPRK broadcasting has no special programming for the inter-Korean Summit and that the president was scheduled to meet DPRK’s President of the Supreme People’s Assembly Presidium Kim Young-nam later in the afternoon, before an “official” meeting with Kim Jong-il. According to a former high-level DPRK defector, Kim Jong-il probably demonstrated a peaceful image to set the stage for a possible visit to Seoul.

Joongang Ilbo (Choi Hoon, “KIM JONG-IL MAKES EXTRAORDINARY DEBUT TO WESTERN WORLD,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that, according to analysts, DPRK leader Kim Jong-il made the unexpected appearance to change his image of being a reclusive leader. Professor Kang Sung-yon of the North Korean Studies department at ROK’s Dongguk University stated, “National Defense Commission Chairman Kim has made the visit of the South Korean President a dramatic turning point so as to change the negative image of himself around the world as a rather ‘isolated and dangerous man.” Analysts said that Kim Dae-jung’s statement upon his arrival at the Pyongyang airport the speech was cancelled when Kim Jong-il made his unexpected appearance. Others said that the speech was cancelled because unexpected protocol problems were raised, including the lack of preparation for a return speech by Kim Jong-il. However, a diplomatic source pointed out that “it is possible that President Kim’s statement at the airport was cancelled so as to focus on the new image of North Korean National Defense Commission Chairman Kim Jong-il.” Kang added, “Kim Jong-il, who has advocated broader and more benevolent political ideas, intended to provide a signal that he had made his full-scale debut in the Western diplomatic world with a typically bold action.” Chung Yong-tae from ROK’s Korea Institute for National Unification (KINU) said, “The exceptional welcoming ceremony and Kim Jong-il’s actions highlight North Korea’s intention to ‘open up’ to the world. Chung commented that “Chairman Kim Jong-il exhibited his intention to give his full attention to resolving the issues on the table at the summit by unveiling to the public his new image as a friendly leader.”

5. Separated Families

The Korea Herald (Chon Shi-yong, “CHONG WA DAE PLAYS DOWN OFFICIAL’S REMARKS ON FAMILY REUNIONS,” Seoul, 06/12/00), Joongang Ilbo (Kim Jin- kook, “KIM SAYS HE WILL CONCENTRATE ON THE DIVIDED FAMILY ISSUE,” Seoul, 06/11/00) and Chosun Ilbo (Kim Min-bai, “CHONG WA DAE DENIES PRIORITIZING DISPLACED FAMILIES,” Seoul, 06/11/00) reported that ROK Chong Wa Dae spokesman Park Joon-young announced Sunday that ROK Deputy Minister of Unification (MOU) Yang Young-shik’s comments about linking the displaced families issue to economic aid were unfounded. Park stated, “The vice minister’s comments differ from the President’s position in many respects.” Park added that ROK President Kim Dae-jung’s basic position is that he will strive to arrange the reunions of divided families but does not have any compensation to the DPRK in mind. Park said, “The President believes that the first-generation members of the separated families are aging and that the reunions should not be delayed further from a humanitarian point of view.”

Chosun Ilbo (Kim Young-su, “DISPLACED FAMILIES PRIORITIZED AT SUMMIT TALKS,” Seoul, 06/09/00) reported that the ROK Deputy Minister of Unification (MOU) Yang Young-shik on Friday stated that the ROK President Kim Dae-jung would seriously address the displaced families issue at the summit meeting with DPRK leader Kim Jong-il. According to Yang, Kim would seek an opening into solving the long-standing problem, and the two countries would seek to link the matter to economic aid in an atmosphere of mutual understanding. Young commented that assistance to the DPRK would be delivered step by step according to the practicality of ROK’s capability. With regard to the nuclear issue, he added that this could be brought up in principle, as there was already a non-nuclear framework for the peninsula agreed to by both sides.

6. Inter-Korean National Assembly Talks

The Korea Herald (“ASSEMBLY TO SEEK TALKS WITH NORTH KOREAN COUNTERPART,” Pyongyang, 06/14/00) reported that the ROK’s National Assembly has decided to sound out during the inter-Korean summit the possibility of holding talks with its DPRK counterpart, the Supreme People’s Assembly. ROK National Assembly Speaker Lee Man-sup stated, “Regular inter-Korean parliamentary meetings are needed to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula and improve inter-Korean ties.” The ROK National Assembly tried unsuccessfully to arrange such a meeting in 1985.

7. Inter-Korean Economic Cooperation

Joongang Ilbo (“GOV’T WILLING TO FINANCE INTER-KOREAN ECONOMIC COOPERATION,” Pyongyang, 06/13/00) reported that the ROK Ministry of Planning and Budget (MPB) disclosed that if visible results are seen after the inter-Korea summit meeting, it plans to comply with budget requests from the relevant ministries as fully as possible. However, an MPB official said, “Even if a dramatic change of course takes place in economic cooperation, the prospect is that an enormous fund will not be necessary right away. Therefore, it is unlikely that a supplementary budget will be drawn up this year.” Accordingly, the MPB plans to give priority to increasing the North-South Cooperation Fund by 500 billion won, which was recently requested by ROK’s Ministry of Unification. If the 500 billion won is added to the current reserve of 530 billion won ($477 million), the available revenue will grow to the level of 1 trillion won. This fund is likely to be used for building the infrastructure necessary for inter-Korean economic cooperation.

8. Inter-Korean Cooperation on Sports

The Korea Herald (Chang Jae-soon, “EXPERTS SEE HIGH POSSIBILITY OF SINGLE OLYMPIC TEAM FOR TWO KOREAS,” Pyongyang, 06/14/00) reported that DPRK experts said that there is a high possibility of the two Koreas forming a single team for the Sydney Olympics this fall. Cho Han-bum, a research fellow at ROK’s Korea Institute for National Unification (KINU), stated, “There is no reason for North Korea not to reach an agreement on forming a joint team with the South for the upcoming Olympic games. North Korea has nothing to lose by participating in this largely symbolic exchange.” He said that the DPRK was convinced to come to the bargaining table with the ROK based on the belief that the inter-Korean summit would help improve the image of DPRK leader Kim Jong-il and the DPRK. He also said the summit would enable Kim to tighten his grip on power. Cho added, “I think that the North has already outlined areas in which it could make concessions to the South, and the sports sector seems to be one of them.” Kim Hak-Sung, another KINU researcher, said, “The atmosphere of the inter-Korean summit seems amicable, as demonstrated by the North Korean leader himself going out to the airport to greet President Kim. This friendly gesture might be a sophisticated negotiation strategy, but considering that Pyongyang would only stand to gain from a sports exchange, I expect that the North will accept a single team proposal by the South.” Kim Un-yong, president of the Korea Sports Council (KSC) and Chung Mong-joon, head of the Korea Football Association (KFA) and vice president of the Federation of International Football Associations are in Pyongyang with ROK President Kim Dae-jung.

9. Inter-Korean Exchange on Weather Information

The Korea Herald (Chang Jae-soon, “SEOUL, P’YANG TO EXCHANGE WEATHER INFORMATION DURING SUMMIT,” 06/12/00) and Joongang Ilbo (Lee young-jong, “NORTH AND SOUTH TO SHARE WEATHER INFO FOR THE FIRST TIME,” Seoul, 06/11/00) reported that, according to an unnamed official, the DPRK was to provide the ROK with up-to-date weather information for its airport, where ROK President Kim Dae-jung was to land for the inter-Korean summit on Tuesday. The official stated, “The North informed us Friday night that it would send current weather reports and forecasts for Pyongyang’s Sunan Airport via the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications Network (AFTN) to the Kimpo Aviation Weather Office in Seoul during the summit period.” He said that the ROK had requested the information, which is essential to flight safety, after it was decided that the President would fly to Pyongyang. In return, the ROK’s Korea Meteorological Administration planned to provide the DPRK with weather information at Seoul’s Kimpo International Airport. International airports around the world exchange information through the AFTN, which is a network airport authorities use to exchange data on aircraft operation, including weather reports, in accordance with standards and recommendations set by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). It is the first time that the two Koreas have exchanged weather information.

10. Web Sites

Chosun Ilbo (Kwon Dae-yeol, “NORTH KOREA TO RELEASE SUMMIT INFO ON THE INTERNET,” Tokyo, 06/12/00) reported that, according to the Choson Shinbo, a newspaper published by pro-DPRK association in Japan, the inter-Korean Summit Meeting news released by DPRK’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) will be available on the Internet at www.tangun.co.jp, a homepage managed by a film distributor, the Asia Picture Center (APC). The Choson Shinbo revealed that the KCNA was launching a page at the Tangun site so that people can view related reports of the talks, which the agency would also broadcast via satellite. Despite the announcement, the site did not operate until Monday afternoon. The Tangun site promotes DPRK films and DPRK musicians and perform artists, and offers information in Korean, Japanese, and English.

The Korea Herald (“SNU LAB PUTS PYONGYANG ROAD MAP ON WEB,” Pyongyang, 06/14/00) reported that a laboratory at the ROK’s Seoul National University is providing geographical information on Pyongyang through its Internet homepage on the occasion of the Summit Meeting. Dubbed “Our Pyongyang,” the homepage shows the location of some 70 major buildings, including Mansudae Assembly Hall and Kim Il Sung University, and the streets in the DPRK capital. The address for the web page is http://kins.snu.ac.kr/pyongyang. The group plans to make the Pyongyang map more precise in the future.

11. Remains of US Soldiers in the ROK

The Korea Herald (Kang Seok-jae, “NEWLY UNCOVERED REMAINS MAY BE THOSE OF U.S. SOLDIER,” Seoul, 06/10/00) reported that, according to ROK Defense Ministry’s Colonel Park In-young on Friday, a set of remains presumed to be those of a US soldier killed in the 1950-53 Korean War were recently discovered and turned over to US authorities. Park stated, “In late April, our soldiers excavated a set of skeletal remains believed to be those of a U.S. soldier killed in the Korean War and sent them on May 31 to the U.S. Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii for forensic tests and identification.” Park said that ROK soldiers discovered the remains in the course of excavation work in the Tabudong area near Taegu.

12. Putin’s Visit to the DPRK

Chosun Ilbo (Hwang Seong-jun, “RUSSIAN PRESIDENT PUTIN TO VISIT NK,” Moscow, 06/09/00) reported that, according to the Russian public relations office Friday, Russian President Vladimir Putin plans to visit the DPRK in the near future and meet with the DPRK leader Kim Jong-il in Pyongyang. The statement added that Putin was formally invited by Kim and that the visit will be the first Pyongyang trip made by Russia’s top leader. Although the statement did not give a specific date for Putin’s visit, Russia’s Itar-Tass news agency reported that it will be between July 10-20. According to an unnamed source, the visit may most likely be made on July 19, taking Putin’s schedule for other foreign trips into consideration. The source explained that July 19 was most convenient since Putin is to visit the PRC on July 18 and participate in the G8 Summit on July 21 in Okinawa, Japan. Putin has also been invited by the ROK and he has promised to visit Korea some time within this year.

13. Russia-DPRK Goodwill Association’s Visit to ROK

Joongang Ilbo (Lee Chul-hee, “RUSSIA-N.K. GOODWILL ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES WILL VISIT SEOUL,” Seoul, 06/11/00) reported that, according to a ROK spokesman, a representative team of Russia and the DPRK congressmen representing a goodwill association composed of lawmakers from the two countries will visit the ROK on June 14. The delegation will be led by Alexei Ponomalyov, who is a member of the Russia’s Parliament Duma. The spokesman said, “Five congressmen, from Russia and North Korea, representing the goodwill association, will visit Seoul for five days beginning June 14. They will share their opinions on things like the visit of the President Vladimir Putin to North Korea in the middle of July.” The team will also meet with ROK National Assembly Speaker Lee Man-sup, acting ROK Prime Minister Lee Han-dong, ROK Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Lee Jung-bin, and ROK Unification Minister Park Jae-kyu to discuss the results of the inter-Korean summit meeting as well as congressional exchanges between the three countries.

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Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:
International Policy Studies Institute Seoul, Republic of Korea
The Center for Global Communications, Tokyo, Japan
Center for American Studies,
Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
Monash Asia Institute,
Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Gee Gee Wong: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Hee-sun: khs688@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hiroyasu Akutsu: akutsu@glocomnet.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Chunsi Wu: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au
Clayton, Australia

Leanne Payton: lbpat1@smtp.monash.edu.au
Clayton, Australia

 


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