ASIAN ENERGY SECURITY NETWORK DAILY REPORT, Wednesday, May 4th, 2005

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"ASIAN ENERGY SECURITY NETWORK DAILY REPORT, Wednesday, May 4th, 2005", EASSNet, May 04, 2005, https://nautilus.org/eassnet/asian-energy-security-network-daily-report-wednesday-may-4th-2005/

LATEST REPORT
Wednesday, May 4th, 2005

Content


1. NBR Asian Energy Security Conference Website

The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) released papers from the Asian Energy Security Conference held in Seattle, Washington on September 28-29, 2004. This conference focused on the geopolitics of Asia’s growing energy demand and the resulting implications for the U.S. Panel session topics included: national energy security policies and strategies in the region; Asia’s growing energy and geopolitical relations with key exporting regions; Asia’s long-term natural gas needs and the geopolitics of natural gas; and nuclear energy development and proliferation.

View the conference website here.
http://www.nbr.org/programs/energy/aesconference.html

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2. Northeast Asian Energy Community

Northeast Asia Economic Forum (“PROMOTING A NORTHEAST ASIAN ENERGY COMMUNITY,” March, 2005) released this final report to their 2000 – 2004 study aimed at analyzing, refining, and promoting the concept of a “Northeast Asian Energy Community.” The research was conducted in five target areas for North East Asia: analysis of changing global energy markets and implications; analysis of energy markets; analysis of challenges to producers and consumers in production and distribution of natural gas; analysis of the investment environment and; analysis of the institutional and policy environment.

Read the paper here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/NEA_Energy_Community_Report.pdf

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3. Asia Pacific LNG Market

Abare Research (Ball, Schneider, Fairhead, Short, “THE ASIA PACIFIC LNG MARKET: ISSUES AND OUTLOOK,” 2004, ABARE RESEARCH REPORT 04.1) released this research report as prepared for the Australian Government Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources. The key objectives in this study are to review existing LNG trade in the Asia Pacific region and to assess likely future developments in the market over the period to 2015. Particular attention is given to the emerging US LNG market, including the possibility of LNG imports to the west coast of north America and the implications of this development for the broader Asia Pacific region.

Read the report here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/APEC_LNG_MARKET.pdf

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4. Asian Oil and Gas Markets

The Institute of East Asian Studies (Mikkal E. Herberg, The National Bureau of Asian Research, “ASIA’S ENERGY INSECURITY: MARKETS OR MERCANTILISM,” April 8-9, 2005) released this presentation for the Conference on Remaking Economic Strengths in East Asia held in Berkeley, CA in April, 2005. The presentation outlines Asian oil and gas trends and projections for future trends and describes the geopolitical climate and current policy response. Herberg argues that “energy is fueling geopolitical rivalries rather than cooperation” and that “mercantilism (is) trumping markets in energy security strategies.”

View the presentation here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/BerkeleyConf_IEAS_4-05.ppt

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5. APEC Nuclear Power

Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre (APERC) (“NUCLEAR POWER GENERATION IN THE APEC REGION,” 2004) released this report in an effort to give policy makers a better understanding of nuclear power’s present standing and recent developments in the APEC region, as well as to give an assessment of what role nuclear power can play in the future. The study examines current policies, plans for the future, and driving forces behind aggressive plans for the expansion of nuclear power in APEC economies. Also considered are the economic competitiveness of new nuclear power plants, the availability of uranium fuel resources, and the implementation of final disposal repositories for high-level radioactive waste. Three scenarios for the future of nuclear power are defined for low expansion, moderate expansion and high expansion of the nuclear industry.

Read the paper here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/aperc_nuclear.pdf

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6. DPRK Hydroelectric

Itar-Tass (Stanislav Varivoda, “HYDROELECTRIC POWER STATION LAUNCHED IN NORTH KOREA,” April 21, 2005) reported that a hydroelectric power station was launched in a festive ceremony in the Hangyong-Namdo province in DPRK’s northeast. The commissioning of the hydroelectric power station has made it possible to normalize energy supply to local plants and residential areas, supply them with drinking water as well as supply enough water for irrigation, the Korean Central News Agency of DPRK reported.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/ITAR_4_21_05.pdf

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7. PRC Energy Security Agency

Associated Press (Elaine Kurtenbach, “CHINA CREATING OFFICE TO SAFEGUARD ‘ENERGY SECURITY’,” April 28, 2005) reported that PRC has created a powerful new agency to oversee the country’s energy security amid booming demand for power and surging oil imports, officials at the country’s main planning agency said. The National Development and Reform Commission is in the midst of preparations for a State Energy Office, said an NDRC official and another official at the commission’s Energy Bureau. The office will likely have a mandate that extends to securing foreign gas and oil, managing domestic coal supplies, resolving chronic electricity shortages and forcing factories to raise efficiency and cut pollution.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/AP_China_admin.pdf

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8. PRC-Japan Relations

Agence France Presse (“CHINA READY FOR TALKS WITH JAPAN ON DEMARCATION IN GAS-RICH EAST CHINA SEA,” April 28, 2005) reported that PRC said it was prepared to enter into consultations with Japan on boundary demarcations in the gas-rich East China Sea dividing the two nations. “China stands ready to start a new round of consultations on the East China Sea as soon as possible,” foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang told a regular briefing. Japan and PRC, two of the world’s biggest energy importers, have seen relations persistently deteriorate over a range of issues, with the PRC public staging sometimes violent rallies against Japan this month.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/AFP_China_Japan2.pdf

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9. PRC Clean Energy

Xinhua News Agency (“WESTERN REGIONS BECOME NEW CLEAN ENERGY BASE FOR CHINA,” April 25, 2005) reported that the once barren desert areas in western China have become a new clean energy base in the country. Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur, which is rich in wind power, began building a wind power project with a generating capacity of 188,000 kw this year at a place 40 km away from Urumqi, the regional capital, said Wang Liming, senior engineer of the regional wind power research institute. The Inner Mongolia’s Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region is preparing to build a wind power project with a generating capacity of 300,000 kw, tripling the region’s wind power projects built in the past 10 years.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Xinhua_China_renewable.pdf

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10. Russia-PRC Oil Pipeline

Alexander’s Gas & Oil Connections (“RUSSIA TO BUILD BRANCH OF OIL PIPELINE TO CHINA,” April 20, 2005, from Kyodo News, April 6, 2005) reported that Russian presidential adviser Viktor Ivanov said the government plans to construct a branch of its oil pipeline to transport oil to PRC from eastern Siberia. Ivanov’s remarks are seen as prioritizing PRC over Japan, which has proposed Russia build a pipeline from Angarsk, near Lake Baikal, to Perevoznaya, near Nakhodka in Russia’s Far East. Japan and PRC had put forward different routes for the pipeline to get access to the Russian oil. Ivanov told that Russia’s plan was fully in line with PRC’s hopes and its economic development program and that crude oil deliveries to PRC, so far by rail, were estimated to reach 10 mm tons this year.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/AGO_RFE_oil.pdf

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11. Russia-Japan Oil Pipeline

EDS (Maya Kaneko, “JAPAN PRESSES RUSSIA TO PRIORITIZE PACIFIC-BOUND PIPELINE,” April 22, 2005) reported that Japan pressed Russia to give priority to constructing a pipeline linking eastern Siberia with near Nakhodka in the Russian Far East to ship oil to Japan, in a move to counter Moscow’s possible plan to build a branch line to China first. Japanese Economy, Trade and Industry Minister Shoichi Nakagawa told Russian Industry and Energy Minister Viktor Khristenko at a meeting that Japan will not offer financial aid for the project if the likelihood of Russia’s building the pipeline to near Nakhodka diminishes, the official said.

Read the article here.
http://nautilus.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/EDS_Japan_RFE_oil.pdf

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