AdaptNet for 10 December 2013

Recommended Citation

"AdaptNet for 10 December 2013", ADAPTNet English Edition, December 11, 2013, https://nautilus.org/adaptnet/adaptnet-for-10-december-2013/

                                                                             ——–NOTICE———

This is the last issue for 2013. AdaptNet will resume on Tuesday, 18 February 2014. We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your interest and support throughout 2013. You are one of over 1300 subscribers to AdaptNet in fifty different countries. We would appreciate your feedback on how AdaptNet is currently being used and how it might be improved in future. Please send comments to us by hitting ‘reply’.

  1. Adaptation and Natural Disaster Risk Management
  2. Flood Mitigation Infrastructure in India and Nepal
  3. Responsible Corporate Engagement in Climate Policy
  4. Economics of Climate Change in East Asia
  5. Climate Change-related Loss and Damage
  6. 2014 Victorian Adaptation Forum – Australia

 

Adaptation and Natural Disaster Risk Management

The report describes the existing legal and governance arrangements in Victoria that influence adaptation in relation to selected extreme events and natural disasters, focusing on the manner in which key points of risk management and decision-making arise under heightened conditions of climate uncertainty. It examines whether current legal, institutional and regulatory arrangements in selected Victorian sectors provide a robust model for effective adaptation.

Governance Arrangements for Climate Change Adaptation and Natural Disaster Risk Management in Victoria: An Initial Analysis of Legal and Regulatory Issues, Lee Godden et al., Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation Research  (VCCCAR), Victoria, Australia, 2013 [564 KB, PDF]

Flood Mitigation Infrastructure in India and Nepal

This study explores the governance system associated with flood management in the Brahmaputra and Koshi basins. It examines the bottlenecks in institutions, policies and practices, and recommends a strategy for improving the governance regime with specific reference to agencies and institutions, both formal and informal, as well as stakeholder communities that influence flood management practices. The study covers the traditional coping and adaptation strategies of local communities to deal with floods.

Policy and Institutions in Adaptation to Climate Change: Case Study on Flood Mitigation Infrastructure in India and Nepal, ICIMOD Working Paper 2013/4, Partha J Das and Himadri K Bhuyan, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Kathmandu, Nepal, 2013

Responsible Corporate Engagement in Climate Policy

The report helps companies to engage in climate-related policies that can create and support a stable global economy. It proposes five core elements of responsible policy engagement: legitimacy, opportunity, consistency, accountability, and transparency. The report suggests three actions to put responsible engagement into practice: identify the company’s climate change risks; opportunities and policy influences; and align words with actions, ambitions and influences (both direct and indirect).

Guide for Responsible Corporate Engagement in Climate Policy: A Caring for Climate Report, United Nations Global Compact (UN Global Compact), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), World Resources Institute (WRI), CDP, WWF, Ceres and The Climate Group, 2013 [2.29 MB, PDF]

Economics of Climate Change in East Asia

This study takes an integrated view of the economics of greenhouse gas mitigation and adaptation in the East Asian region, focusing on the People’s Republic of China, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and Mongolia. It explores how strategies for climate change adaptation, over the next few decades, can be integrated with greenhouse mitigation efforts. The study finds that the cost of climate adaptation is outweighed by the cost of inaction in East Asian countries.

Economics of Climate Change in East Asia, Michael I. Westphal, Gordon A. Hughes and Jörn Brömmelhörster (editors), Asian Development Bank (ADB), 2013 [1.41 MB, PDF]

Climate Change-related Loss and Damage

This report presents findings about ‘loss and damage’ (concept that has gained interest since the 16th UNFCCC conference in 2010) in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Mozambique and Nepal by focusing on adaptation limits and non-economic losses. The report finds that ‘loss and damage’ happens concurrently with adaptation. If adaptation is insufficient to manage climatic stressors, ‘loss and damage’ can undermine human wellbeing and adaptive capacity.

Pushed to the Limit: Evidence of Climate Change-related Loss and Damage When People Face Constraints and Limits to Adaptation, Warner, K., van der Geest, K. and Kreft, S., United Nations University Institute of Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS), Bonn, Germany, November 2013 [2.77 MB, PDF]

2014 Victorian Adaptation Forum – Australia

The 2014 Victorian Adaptation Forum will take place in Melbourne, Australia on 19-20 March 2014. The forum will focus on various issues and activities, including: the benefits of Victorian adaptation research for local and state governments and non-government decision-makers; future research and information needs; and how researchers are responding to the information needs identified as priority areas in the Victorian Climate Change Adaptation Plan. Proposals may be submitted by 15 January 2014.

2014 Victorian Adaptation Forum, Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation Research-VCCCAR, CSIRO, and Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government, Carlton, Melbourne, Australia, March 19-20, 2014

For further information, please contact the editor, Saleem Janjua: daptnet@rmit.edu.au

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Professor Darryn McEvoy, Program Leader, RMIT University Climate Change Adaptation Programme

Professor Peter Hayes, Co-founder and Executive Director of Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability

Dr. Saleem Janjua, Editor, AdaptNet

AdaptNet is a free fortnightly report produced by RMIT University Global Cities Research Institute’s Climate Change Adaptation Programme, Melbourne, Australia. It is published in partnership with the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability.


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