AdaptNet for 1 April 2014

Recommended Citation

"AdaptNet for 1 April 2014", ADAPTNet English Edition, April 01, 2014, https://nautilus.org/adaptnet/adaptnet-for-1-april-2014/

  1. Climate Change and Local Indigenous Knowledge
  2. Location Security and Environmental-Induced Displacement
  3. Stakeholder-Driven Research for Climate Adaptation
  4. Natural Disasters and Climate Change – Cost Estimates
  5. Community Flood Management Knowledge – Australia
  6. Environment and Natural Resources International Conference

Climate Change and Local Indigenous Knowledge

This project aims to understand how the deep knowledge of country of the Yorta Yorta people could combine with state of the art climate science to strengthen their participation and influence in national and regional management processes and how climate adaptation could be incorporated in those decisions to deliver improved management outcomes. It provides basis for producing integrated maps and analyses to support decision making in the region.

Learning from Indigenous Knowledge for Improved Natural Resource Management in the Barmah-Millewa in a Changing and Variable Climate, Final Report to VCCCAR, Dave Griggs et al., Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, 2014 [746 KB, PDF]

Location Security and Environmental-Induced Displacement

The article examines how environmentally induced shocks may give rise to migration. It employs the notion of ‘location security’, which describes the uncertainties facing people in potentially threatened areas and the complex effects of their anticipated adaptation. By introducing case studies from Bangladesh, the Carteret Islands, and the Maldives, the article describes how location security may be used to inform current and anticipated environmental pressures that may give rise to migration.

Location Security and Environmental-Induced Displacement: A Case Study of the Riverine Islands in Bangladesh, Brad K. Blitz, vol. 29, no. 2, Refuge, 2014 [174 KB, PDF]

Stakeholder-Driven Research for Climate Adaptation

The paper discusses how climate and extremes have been changing over recent decades, focusing on New York City. It summarises past and ongoing research programs that seek to better understand the city’s vulnerability to climate change or to develop adaptation strategies, with an emphasis on research undertaken in partnership with stakeholders such as city agencies, utilities, and insurers. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions and lessons from New York City’s experience which may be applicable to other places.

Stakeholder-Driven Research for Climate Adaptation in New York City (Chapter 4), Nir Y. Krakauer, New Trends in Earth-Science Outreach and Engagement, Advances in Natural and Technological Hazards Research, Springer International Publishing, 2014 [398 KB, PDF]

Natural Disasters and Climate Change – Cost Estimates

This report looks at the known economic costs of natural disasters in Victoria over the period of a decade (2003-2013). It considers the key forms of natural disasters which have a climatic dimension, including: bushfires; drought; heatwaves; and floods. The paper estimates that natural disasters in Victoria over the past 10 years have cost almost $20 billion. Of this figure, $6.762 billion was from government/public funds, and the remaining $13.174 billion came from insurance payouts.

Natural Disasters and a Warming Climate: Understanding the Cumulative Financial Impacts on Victoria, Tom Delbridge and Cam Walker, Friends of the Earth, Melbourne, Australia, 2014

Community Flood Management Knowledge – Australia

The study discovers lessons from the Australian floods of 2010-2011 about managing extreme floods for specific vulnerable groups. It identifies the strengths and weaknesses of community knowledge about flood management for Queensland vulnerable groups.  The paper concludes that community flood management knowledge about vulnerable groups is marginal, especially outside immediate response management.

A Method for Assessing Community Flood Management Knowledge for Vulnerable Groups: Australia’s 2010–2011 Floods, Erica Bell and Grant Blashki, Community Development Journal, Oxford University Press, 2014 [subscription required]

Environment and Natural Resources International Conference

The 1st Environment and Natural Resources International Conference (ENRIC 2014): Global Climate Change and Sustainability Pathways will take place from 6-7 November, 2014 at Bangkok, Thailand. The conference aims to discuss pertinent issues with a regional focus, and to stimulate future collaboration in order to more effectively adapt to our changing world. Abstracts may be submitted before 16 May 2014.

1st Environment and Natural Resources International Conference (ENRIC 2014): Global Climate Change and Sustainability Pathways, Bangkok, Thailand, 6-7 November, 2014

For further information, please contact the editor, Dr. Saleem Janjua: muhammadsaleem.janjua@rmit.edu.au

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Professor Darryn McEvoy, Program Leader, RMIT University Climate Change Adaptation Programme

Professor Peter Hayes, Co-founder and Executive Director of Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability

Dr. Saleem Janjua, Editor, AdaptNet

AdaptNet is a free fortnightly report produced by RMIT University Global Cities Research Institute’s Climate Change Adaptation Programme, Melbourne, Australia. It is published in partnership with the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability.


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