Browse

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"Browse", Supporting Documents, January 22, 2002, https://nautilus.org/supporting-documents/browse/

Globalization & Governance

Tuesday, January 22, 2002

Foreign Investment & the Environment | Regional Environmental Governance | Trade & Environment | Corporate Accountability


Corporate Accountability

 


Foreign Investment & the Environment

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Getting Traction? Sustainable Development and the Governance of Investment
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This paper explores new approaches to the global governance of investment which incorporate these concerns and could channel investment, especially foreign direct investment (FDI), towards more socially just and ecologically sustainable development. .

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Havens, Halos and Spaghetti: Untangling the Evidence About the Relationship Between Foreign Investment and the Environment
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Examines the evidence in support of what is at stake in the debate, viz., the shape and content of emerging global governance of investment. Develops an analytical framework to map potential linkages between FDI and the environment, including micro-level decisions, such as industry location and firm environmental performance, as well as macro-level impacts on eco-systems, indigenous cultures, income and consumption.

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Stuck In the Mud? Nation-States, Globalisation and the Environment
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Presents the hypothesis that–in the absence of effective multilateralism–economic globalization constrains innovation in national environmental policy and thus the rate of improvement in environmental performance.

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Regional Environmental Governance

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
From Bystanders to Collaborators: New Roles for Civil Society in Urban-Industrial Environmental Governance in Asia

ZARSKY, Lyuba, (Nautilus Institute), TAY, Simon, (Singapore Institute of International Affairs)
Civil Society and the Future of Environmental Governance in Asia
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This paper explores the role that civil society could play as a ‘driver’ of a new paradigm of ecologically sustainable and equitable development in Asia. It argues that the growth and effectiveness of civil society–and the processes of democratization which nourish it–is likely to be the most significant force in the emergence and implementation of such a paradigm. On the one hand, only civil society, both business and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), can build the political will for a new approach to development which sets social and environmental goals as part of the development process. On the other hand, the creative engagement of civil society will be crucial in developing and implementing an effective model of environmental governance.

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Civil Society and Clean Shared Growth in Asia: Towards a Stakeholder Model of Environmental Governance
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The financial and economic crises which swept East Asia in the late 1990s signaled the need–and provided an opening for–a change of course in development strategy for Asian NICS. Central to this change is a new emphasis on the importance of “good governance,” in the context of market-oriented policy reforms. These trends may bode well for the environment. A new paradigm based on “clean shared urban-industrial growth” can take root if it garners a deep and broad political and social commitment within Asian societies. This paper first describes the roles civil society organizations could play in a performance-based approach to environmental governance. It then sketches three governance models, and considers civil society and environmental governance in the context of globalization.

HAYES, Peter and Lyuba ZARSKY, Nautilus Institute
Acid Rain in a Regional Context
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Provides a definition of the acid rain problem in Asia in technical as well as policy terms, reviews what is known about emissions in the region and the current state of knowledge concerning calculated and measured deposition of acid rain, considers the transboundary transport and deposition of acid rain with particular reference to Northeast Asia, and presents some estimates of the technological cost of controlling emissions to a level which do not exceed calculated critical loads for the region. Concludes with a brief discussion of the next critical steps that should be considered in tackling the acid rain problem in this region.

HAYES, Peter and Lyuba ZARSKY, Nautilus Institute
Environmental Issues and Regimes in Northeast Asia
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Describes significant environmental problems in Northeast Asia at a regional level (transboundary acid rain), analyses emerging regimes addressing these issues, addresses five critical issues (capacity building; spillover effects between environmental issues; monitoring and enforcement issues; financing; and, the importance of non governmental organisations and public awareness), and frames a set of questions for continuing research and analysis in light of what can be learned from the Northeast Asian experience.

HAYES, Peter and Lyuba ZARSKY, Nautilus Institute
Regional Cooperation and Environmental Issues in Northeast Asia

There is a rapidly emerging agenda for regional collaboration on environmental issues in Northeast Asia. The first part focuses on transfrontier air pollution, marine pollution, migratory animals, and economic integration as regional environmental issues amenable to regional cooperation. The second part deals with four emerging regional environmental regimes: Northwest Pacific Action Plan, Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, Northeast Asian Environment Programme, and the Sub-Regional Technical Cooperation and Development Programme.

HUNTER, Jason, Nautilus Institute
The Tumen River Area Development Program, Transboundary Water Pollution, and Environmental Security in Northeast Asia
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Provides a brief history of the Tumen River Area Development Program, highlights the program’s metamorphosis from a multilateral effort into “concerted unilateralism” approach, and, through the lens of transboundary water pollution, examines this metamorphosis’s impact on the interface between ecological integrity and political security.

HUNTER, Jason and ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Communities, Markets and City Government:Innovative Roles for Coastal Cities to Reduce Marine Pollution in the Asia-Pacific
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This paper examines the pivotal role coastal cities play as both sources of marine pollution problems as well as of marine pollution solutions. This paper has three aims. First, to outline of a “new model” of environmental management based on the collaboration of government with markets and communities. Second, to explore how such a model is salient in addressing marine pollution in the two dimensions of: a) increasing investment in water infrastructure, and b) raising industrial performance in water pollution and conservation. Third, to consider why and how the model might take root in a city government context.

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
Energy and the Environment in Asia-Pacific: Regional Cooperation and Market Governance
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Examines the role of regional cooperation in nudging markets towards more environmentally sound and secure energy development in Asia

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
The Domain of Environmental Cooperation in Northeast Asia
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This paper explores the domain of environmental cooperation in Northeast Asia. Part I develops an analytical framework in which the domain of regional environmental cooperation encompasses three broad categories: 1) the governance of common pool, transboundary resources and ecosystem services; 2) management of the trade-environment interface in the context of high levels of regional economic integration; and 3) building of human and technical capacities to manage within-border resources, as well as to respond to global environmental problems. Part II examines regional environmental problems in Northeast Asia, including acid rain, marine degradation, and habitat/biodiversity loss; and the environmental implications of projected high rates of growth and intra-regional trade. Part III outlines initiatives in environmental cooperation in Northeast Asia by governments and non-governmental organizations; and offers three proposals to extend the domain of regional environmental cooperation.

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Trade & Environment

HUNTER, Jason, Nautilus Institute
APEC: Promise or Peril in the Asia-Pacific
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Explores APEC’s relationship to environmental degradation within the Asia-Pacific, provides an overview of APEC’s institutional structure and two track agenda, and describes ways APEC can reconcile the often competing agendas found under its purview.

NAUTILUS INSTITUTE
APEC and the Environment: Innovative Approaches to Trade and Environment in Asia-Pacific
Workshop Papers

Workshop held on October 18th, 1996, in San Francisco, CA. These papers were prepared for the Trade and Environment Policy Project (TEPP) series – a collaboration between the Nautilus Institute, National Wildlife Federation, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE).

NAUTILUS INSTITUTE
Connectivity Monitor

Back issues of the Institute’s bi-monthly report on trade and environment issues in the Asia-Pacific region.

NAUTILUS INSTITUTE
Trade and Environment in Asia-Pacific: Prospects for Regional Cooperation
Workshop Papers

Workshop held on September 23-25, 1994, in Honolulu, HI. (Organised by Nautilus Institute and co-sponsored by the East-West Center and the Monterey Institute for International Studies.)

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
APEC, Citizen Groups, and the Environment: Common Interests, Broad Agenda
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Provides guiding principles and innovative strategies to build environmental concerns into APEC’s very foundation.

ZARSKY, Lyuba, Nautilus Institute
APEC, Globalization and the “Sustainable Development” Agenda
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Outlines the analytical and political contours of environmental regionalism in Asia-Pacific, examines the politics of environmental diplomacy at APEC, and analyzes the “value-added” domain of environmental cooperation. In addition, describes APEC’s environmental initiatives between 1993 and 1998, and evaluates APEC’s overall work on sustainable development. Concludes that, despite its shortcomings, APEC remains the only multilateral trans-Pacific economic institution in Asia Pacific.

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