NAPSNet Daily Report 22 June, 2001

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 22 June, 2001", NAPSNet Daily Report, June 22, 2001, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-22-june-2001/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. DPRK Reaction to IAEA
2. DPRK Food Aid
3. Sino-US Relations
4. US Spy Plane in PRC

I. United States

1. DPRK Reaction to IAEA

Agence France Presse (“NORTH KOREA ACCUSES IAEA OF SIDING WITH “HOSTILE” US POLICY,” Seoul, 6/21/01) reported that the DPRK’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said on Thursday accused the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) of siding with US “hostile” policy towards the country. The IAEA complained of little progress in its seven-year effort to verify the DPRK’s nuclear activities, including plutonium production. However, the DPRK denounced the IAEA for issuing a sided statement last week that it was “still unable to verify the correctness and completeness of the initial report of nuclear material” in the DPRK. KCNA said, “This is an indication that the organization is joining hostile forces in their moves to stifle the DPRK … when the US is calling for an early special inspection of the nuclear-related facilities of the DPRK.” It said the IAEA’s verification should come after “most of the LWR project” has been completed as stated in the deal. It continued, “This is in contravention of the DPRK-US Agreed Framework, and an affront to the DPRK. The DPRK has been sincere in ensuring the IAEA’s surveillance over the DPRK’s nuclear freeze in the past according to the DPRK-US Agreed Framework and will continue to fulfill its commitment with sincerity.” KCNA insisted that the IAEA should “blame the US for the delay in the LWR project and urge it to complete the project as scheduled” to solve the issue.

2. DPRK Food Aid

Japan Economic Newswire (“N. KOREA BLOCKS INT’L FOOD AID TO DISSENTERS: H.K. PAPER,” 6/22/01) reported that Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post quoted DPRK defectors on Friday saying that the DPRK is blocking international food aid to punish parts of the country that have seen antigovernment rebellions and protests. The paper said DPRK refugees who have crossed into the PRC have reported numerous protests and armed uprisings in the northeastern coastal provinces in the 1990s, including the cities of Hamhung in South Hamgyong Province and Chongjin, Hoeryong and Musan in North Hamgyong Province. The report quoted aid workers as confirming that far less food is being shipped to key industrial cities on the east coast, although the aid workers attributed it to transportation problems. Kathi Zellweger of Caritas-Hong Kong, which has been coordinating the Caritas Internationalis aid program for the DPRK since autumn 1995, was quoted as saying the east coast has always been more neglected than other parts of the country. The report also noted that very little is known about the food and health situation in many counties in northern mountainous provinces such as Jagang and Ryanggang, which have been closed to aid workers since the start of the famine, officially acknowledged in 1995.

3. Sino-US Relations

Agence France Presse (“U.S. HOSTS CHINA’S ASSISTANT FOREIGN MINISTER,” Washington, 6/22/01) reported that PRC Assistant Foreign Minister Zhao Wenzhong visited the US State Department on Thursday for what US officials said were routine talks on Sino-US relations. Zhao was hosted by US Assistant Secretary of State for Asia and Pacific Affairs James Kelly and was also due to hold talks with Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage. A US State Department official, “They will be talking about a broad range of issues.” Officials said the US side brought up the cases of five scholars being detained in the PRC, who are either US residents or citizens.

4. US Spy Plane in PRC

Agence France Presse (“DISMANTLED U.S. SPY PLANE TO LEAVE CHINA IN MID- JULY, U.S. OFFICIAL SAYS,” Beijing, 6/22/01) reported that Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Barger, of the US Pacific Command in Hawaii, said Friday that the dismantling of a US spy plane on Hainan is going smoothly and the aircraft is expected to leave the country in mid-July. Barger said, “Right now the plan as agreed upon by China and the U.S. has been going along very well, very cooperatively on both sides.” He added that twelve technicians from Lockheed Martin Corporation, which built the EP- 3, have begun draining aviation fuel and the oxygen systems from the damaged aircraft.

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Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:
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Gee Gee Wong: napsnet@nautilus.org
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Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
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Robert Brown: napsnet@nautilus.org
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Seoul, Republic of Korea

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Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Yunxia Cao: yule111@sina.com
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au
Clayton, Australia

 


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