NAPSNet Daily Report 11 September, 2001

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"NAPSNet Daily Report 11 September, 2001", NAPSNet Daily Report, September 11, 2001, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-11-september-2001/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. DPRK Military Purchases
2. ROK Cabinet Reshuffling
3. Cross-Strait Relations
4. PRC-Russian Relations
5. US Support of Taiwan Entrance into UN
6. US-Japan Relations
II. Republic of Korea 1. ROK – US Talks
III. People’s Republic of China 1. DPRK-ROK Relations
2. PRC on Jiang Zemin’s DPRK Visit
3. DPRK on PRC President’s Visit
4. PRC-US Relations
5. PRC-US Disputes on Export Controls
6. US Missile Sale to Taiwan
7. PRC-Russian Relations
IV. Japan 1. Japan-China Relations
2. Japan-ROK Relations

I. United States

1. DPRK Military Purchases

The Associated Press (Soo-Jeong Lee, “NO MILITARY BUILD-UP IN N. KOREA,” Seoul, 9/10/01) reported that the ROK Defense Ministry said in a report to the parliament on Monday that the DPRK has imported US$340 million of military equipment in the past decade. Half of the spending took place in the last two years, possibly reflecting a slight improvement in the DPRK’s economic situation. ROK defense officials said the DPRK was not engaged in a big arms buildup. ROK Lieutenant Colonel Chang Sung-hyun said, “The imports concentrate on military equipment rather than weapons, and it seems to us they are increasing the imports simply to change their outdated equipment.” The DPRK military obtained most of its foreign equipment from Russia and the PRC. Last year, the DPRK spent US$100 million on aircraft parts and tank engines and batteries. In 1999, it bought MiG-21 fighter planes and helicopters from Kazakstan and Russia. ROK officials said the DPRK has also bought explosives, artillery pieces and trucks.

2. ROK Cabinet Reshuffling

The Associated Press (Christopher Tochia, “KEY SOUTH KOREA OFFICIAL GETS NEW JOB,” Seoul, 9/11/01) reported that Former ROK Unification Minister Lim Dong-won, an architect of ROK President Kim Dae-jung’s policy of engaging the DPRK got a new job Tuesday as a senior presidential adviser. Lim will retain considerable influence over the government’s DPRK policy as special adviser for foreign affairs, security and unification. Yoo Jung-seok, a spokesman for the ROK’s presidential Blue House, said the post is newly created. The opposition Grand National Party condemned the appointment. In a statement, the party said the president was “ridiculing the public” by re-employing a close aide who had just lost his job.

3. Cross-Strait Relations

Reuters (“CHINESE GENERAL BLOWS HOT AND COLD ON TAIWAN,” Beijing, 9/11/01) reported that PRC General Xiong Guangkai, a deputy chief of general staff, said on Tuesday that relations between the PRC and Taiwan had become “grimmer and more complex” and the PRC would not renounce the use of military force to reunify the two sides. However, Xiong left out an explicit threat to go to war with the island if it moved towards independence, a statement included in an official transcript of his speech. He also pledged to preserve Taiwan’s freedoms, including an independent judiciary and currency, if it reunited with the PRC under a system applied to Hong Kong and Macau. Xiong is the only military official in the Communist Party’s seven-member Central Leading Group for Taiwan Affairs. Although Xiong insisted Taiwan recognize the “one China” principle, his speech was relatively mild for the PRC military. Xiong told a forum on the PRC in the 21st century that Taiwan President Chen Shui-bian had “seriously wrecked the premise and foundation of peaceful reunification of the two sides across the Taiwan Strait” since his election last year. Xiong said, “Compared with the situation a few years ago, the current situation of the Taiwan Strait has become grimmer and more complex. If, in the face of the challenge of Taiwan independence force, we make a commitment to give up the use of military force, our people will not understand or accept it. Taiwan independence forces, on the other hand, might be encouraged by such a commitment to make a reckless move. The consequence will be to really ignite the flames of war across the Taiwan Strait, something none of us want to see.”

4. PRC-Russian Relations

The Itar-Tass (Irina Bazhenova, Natalia Lenskaya, “RUSSIA, CHINA FOR MORE INTERACTION ON WORLD SCENE,” Moscow, 9/11/01) reported that Russian foreign minister Igor Ivanov and PRC foreign minister Tang Jiaxuan said Tuesday during talks in Moscow that they endorse further strengthening of interaction between the two countries in the international arena. Questions of strategic stability and prospects for interaction of the two countries in the framework of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization were among the international problems discussed at the meeting. The two sides also exchanged opinions on topical questions of bilateral relations. The ministers noted that the sixth regular meeting of the heads of government of Russia and the PRC that was held in St. Petersburg on September 8 “set the beginning to the implementation of the Treaty of Good-neighborliness, Friendship and Cooperation.” It was noted that the results of the meeting “will give a strong impetus to the development of Russo- Chinese relations in practical areas and will fill relations of strategic partnership between the two countries with new important contents”.

5. US Support of Taiwan Entrance into UN

US Department of State’s Office of International Information Programs (“LAWMAKERS BACK TAIWAN’S EFFORT TO JOIN UNITED NATIONS,” 9/10/01) reported that US Representative Peter King of New York and Representative Gary Ackerman of New York joined forces in urging support for Taiwan’s efforts to be accepted in international organizations in September 6 speeches to the US House of Representatives. King and Ackerman, both members of the US House International Relations Committee, made their speeches the same day US Representative Robert Schaffer of Colorado introduced House Concurrent Resolution 219, which would express the sense of Congress for US policy to back Taiwan’s membership in international organizations. King said Taiwan is “prepared and able to actively support the endeavors of the United Nations.” He added that Taiwan believes that its membership in the UN “would have a positive effect on peace and stability in the region.” Ackerman said, “It is time for the United Nations, on the principles of universality enshrined in the United Nations Charter, to acknowledge Taiwan’s accomplishments and allow Taiwan to be a Member State.”

6. US-Japan Relations

US Department of State’s Office of International Information Programs (“POWELL’S REMARKS SEPTEMBER 8 ON US-JAPAN SECURITY TREATY,” 9/10/01) reported that US Secretary of State Colin Powell said in San Francisco on September 8 that the peace conference and the US-Japan Security Treaty signed in 1951 fostered “a living, breathing” alliance that is still based on “shared vital interests.” Today, Powell said, “Japan is a welcome partner in managing international economic issues, and a critical bilateral trade partner for the United States.” He added that the US-Japan alliance “is a cornerstone of America’s engagement in Asia and remains key to regional stability and prosperity.”

II. Republic of Korea

1. ROK – US Talks

The Korea Herald (“S.K., U.S. OFFICIALS DISCUSS N. KOREA,” Seoul, 09/11/01) reported that senior officials of the ROK and the US met to discuss their policies on the DPRK Tuesday. Charles L. Pritchard, US special envoy for Korean peace talks, met with Vice Foreign Minister Choi Sung-hong and other senior officials. He arrived here Saturday for a four-day visit. A ministry official, who attended the meetings, said Pritchard appeared optimistic of prospects for a resumption of US-DPRK negotiations in view of the two Koreas’ decision to resume government- level talks in Seoul this weekend. The ROK officials explained the ROK- DPRK ministerial talks to be held September 15-18 and called on the US to take more active measures to bring the DPRK to the dialogue table. The official added the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee plans to hold a hearing on DPRK policy Sept. 13 or Sept. 20.

III. People’s Republic of China

1. DPRK-ROK Relations

China Daily (Xinhua News Agency, “ROK TO PUSH DPRK POLICY DESPITE BLOW,” Seoul, 09/06/01, P12) reported that ROK will forge ahead with its policy of engaging the DPRK despite the opposition’s ouster of ROK’s minister in charge of relations with DPRK, Foreign Minister Han Seung-soo said on September 5. Han told reporters a day after the cabinet resigned en masse over a no-confidence vote against Unification Minister Lim Dong- won that ROK President Kim Dae-jung would push ahead with his centerpiece reconciliation policy “without any interruptions.” “This is the policy supported not only by the people of the world, but most of the people in ROK,” he said. Han told a news conference he interpreted a recent offer by DPRK to resume stalled talks with ROK in a “reconciliatory way.” He took Japan to task for a “regressive attitude” towards its 1910-45 colonial rule over Korea, urging Japan’s Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to use his popularity to settle Japan’s spats with Asian neighbours over history. Han and the rest of Kim Dae-jung’s cabinet tendered their resignations on Tuesday following a vote the day before in which the National Assembly passed an opposition motion to dismiss Lim. Kim was expected to name a new cabinet this week, retaining Han. The vote followed Lim’s approval of a visit last month to DPRK by ROK activists.

Wenhui Daily (Xinhua News Agency, “INTER-KOREA RECONCILIATION TALKS SET FOR SEPTEMBER,” Beijing, 09/07/01, P12) reported that the DPRK has accepted the ROK’s timetable for another round of talks. The fifth inter-Korean ministerial-level meeting is scheduled for September 15-18 in Seoul. The meeting will mark the end of a six-month hold on inter- Korean reconciliation talks, which coincided with a setback in US-DPRK relations following George W. Bush’s presidential inauguration. “We hope the dialogue will proceed in line with the June 15 inter-Korean summit joint declaration,” read the acceptance message from DPRK. An inter-Korean liaison officer received the message via phone at the Panmunjom truce village. Officials from the two sides are expected to continue negotiations on the cross-border railway and highway reconnection project, reunions of separated families, the opening of an overland tour route to DPRK’s Mount Kumgang and ROK’s support for the development of an industrial complex in the DPRK city of Kaesong.

2. PRC on Jiang Zemin’s DPRK Visit

PLA Daily (Luo Hui, Lin Dequan, “JIANG’S DPRK TRIP STRENGTHENS FRIENDSHIP,” Beijing, 09/06/01, P1) reported that PRC President and General Secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee Jiang Zemin returned to Beijing on September 5, after a three- day official good-will visit to DPRK. Dai Bingguo, head of the International Department of the CPC Central Committee, highly appreciated Jiang’s visit, noting “it was fruitful and successful.” “It is an important step to promote the peace and stability in the Korean Peninsula,” he said, “and will significantly influence the future Sino- DPRK relations.” In order to welcome Jiang’s visit and celebrate the DPRK-China friendship, DPRK held a series of big events, including receptions and a callisthenic performance featuring more than 100,000 people. “The grand reception that President Jiang received reflects the profound friendship between the two peoples, and highlights the better future of the development of bilateral relations,” Dai said.

3. DPRK on PRC President’s Visit

People Daily (Zhao Jiaming, “PRC PRESIDENT’S VISIT TO DPRK: AN IMPORTANT EVENT IN HISTORY OF BILATERAL RELATIONS,” Pyongyang, 09/09/01, P3) reported that DPRK Nodong News published a commentary, saying that PRC President Jiang Zemin’s formal and friendly visit to DPRK is an important event in the history of DPRK-China relations. The commentary said DPRK released news communique introducing Jiang’s DPRK visit, noting that people of the two countries are happy to see the fruitful outcomes achieved through Jiang’s visit. It said that leaders from the two countries have reached consensus on strengthening bilateral exchanges and co-operations, and promoting bilateral relations to a higher level. The commentary pointed out that in the new century, it is in consistent with the fundamental interests and wishes from peoples of the two countries, which will influence positively on Asian peace, stability and development.

4. PRC-US Relations

China Daily (Xinhua News Agency, “IMPORTANCE OF SINO-US RELATIONS EMPHASIZED,” 09/07/01, P1) reported that on September 6, PRC President Jiang Zemin said PRC-US ties have recently improved, but concerted efforts are still needed to continue to safeguard this hard-won improvement. In a meeting with former US former President Jimmy Carter and his party, Jiang said that the 21st century should be one of peace and friendship, and the nations should make joint efforts to this end. He expressed his belief that so long as the two sides abide by the three joint communiques and the basic norms guiding international relations, increase mutual understanding and safeguard and promote shared interests, Sino-US ties will continue to improve and expand. Jiang said he hopes the two nations develop a constructive, cooperation relationship, as this is conducive to friendship between the two peoples and to world peace, stability and development. Because of different circumstances, it is not surprising that the two countries have different viewpoints, Jiang said, adding that the world should be diversified, and it is improper and impossible to have only one way of doing things. China holds that all civilizations and social systems should co-exist and learn from each other’s strong points to offset their weaknesses, Jiang said. Carter said during his term as US president, the greatest thing he did was help to forge diplomatic ties with China. The US is pursuing the one-China policy and this China is the People’s Republic of China, he said.

5. PRC-US Disputes on Export Controls

China Daily (Xinhua News Agency, “SANCTIONS BY US OPPOSED,” 09/06/01, P1) reported that on September 5 PRC Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao said PRC Government has made formal representations to the US Government over its decision to impose sanctions against the Chinese side. Zhu said that the US Government decided, starting from September 1, to impose sanctions against the Chinese side under the pretext of the claimed export of missile-related items to Pakistan by the China Metallurgical Equipment Corporation (MECC). The Chinese side cannot but express strong indignation at and resolute opposition to the US’s hegemonic act of willfully imposing sanctions against other countries according to its own domestic laws. He said that over a period of time, the US has repeatedly alleged that MECC was engaged in missile proliferation activities according to its so-called “intelligence information.” In-depth investigations by the Chinese side indicate that MECC has never engaged in any activities as alleged by the US and that its allegation is groundless. However, he said, the US side is bent on making the erroneous decision based on its wrong intelligence information, in disregard of the constructive position and the investigation results of the Chinese side. Such a US move is totally groundless and irresponsible, and the Chinese side can never accept it. Zhu said that on the issue of non-proliferation, the Chinese policy is consistent and clear-cut. Last November, China and the US announced respectively their policies on missile non-proliferation and Sino-US co- operation on space launches. China has all along strictly fulfilled its own commitment. However, the US side not only failed to honour its own commitment, but also decide to impose sanctions on China with no cause. “This cannot but make us doubt the sincerity of the US in honouring the relevant bilateral understandings,” Zhu said.

6. US Missile Sale to Taiwan

China Daily (Shao Zongwei, “MISSILE SALE VIOLATES JOINT COMMUNIQUES, IMPAIRS TIES,” 09/07/01, P1) reported that on September 6, the PRC warned the US of the danger of selling Maverick missiles to Taiwan, urging it to honor its commitments. “The US, if it sells such weapons to Taiwan, will once again violate the three Sino-US joint communiques, particularly the August 17 Joint Communique, and other US commitments, and send wrong signals to the Taiwanese authorities,” said Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao at a regular briefing. He said China is firmly opposed to the sale of missiles, which he described as “wanton interference in China’s internal affairs.” The Pentagon on Wednesday notified the US Congress of a possible sale of 40 Maverick air-to- surface guided missiles to Taiwan. Zhu urged the US to adhere to the one-China policy, the three Sino-US joint communiques and related commitments and to stop selling weapons to Taiwan so as not to impair Sino-US ties and cross-Straits relations. According to the spokesman, PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan will hold talks with US Secretary of State Colin Powell and other US leaders during his US visit on September 20 and 21. “They will conduct in-depth exchanges of views on bilateral relations and international and regional issues of common concern,” said Zhu. “We hope the visit will enhance mutual understanding and trust and further promote bilateral exchanges and cooperation.”

7. PRC-Russian Relations

People Daily (Xu Hongzhi, Sun Yongjun, Ma Jian, “SINO-RUSSIAN COOPERATIONS ENTER FAST LANE,” 09/11/01, P3) carried a news letter reporting PRC Premier Zhu Rongji’s visit to Russia. On September 9, Premier Zhu arrived in Moscow from St. Petersburg, where he attended the 6th routine meeting with his Russian counterpart, to continue his state visit. The 6th routine meeting has proved to be successful by signing a series of agreements. At the press conference after the meeting with Russian Premier, Zhu said the key reason for the successful meeting is that the Sino-Russian Good Neighboring and Cooperation Treaty, signed by PRC President Jiang Zemin and Russian President Putin, paved the way for this meeting. Zhu added that the goal for Premiers’ meeting is to carry out the principles, spirits and agreements. Leaders from the two countries have paid high attention to this September meeting, considering that it will inject new power to long-term bilateral economic co-operations. Economic and trade cooperation is a key field in bilateral relations, Zhu stressed, and the implementation of agreements related to economy, trade, science and technology will incrementally enrich the material base for Sino-Russian strategically collaborative partnership. Premier Zhu stressed for many times, during his visit in Russia, that the Sino-Russia friendly cooperation wagon has surpassed the grinding period, and begins to drive to the fast lane.

IV. Japan

1. Japan-China Relations

The Nihonkeizai-shinbun (Tsuyoshi Kurokawa, “THE MEETING FOR FREE TRADE AGREEMENT,” Singapore, 09/07/01, 1) reported that Japan and ASEAN agreed the opening of the conference at economic ministerial level for strengthening economic relationship. According to Nihonkeizai-shinbun, Japan in the meeting aims not only to have economic effect, but also to restrain China which is increasing its economic influence and has had talks with ASEAN to explore the possibility of entering into Free Trade Agreement (FTA) since last November.

Financial Times (James Kynge, Richard McGregor and John Thornhill, “CHINA URGES TOKYO TO FACE WAR RECORD,” Shanghai, 09/11/01, 12) reported that Zhou Wonzhong, an assistant foreign minister, renounced the Japanese prime minister’s visit to Yasukuni shrine, as saying that the visit to Yasukuni had shown up the insincere nature of previous Japanese statements of regret for wartime atrocities. He said, “Japan should take visible action to stop the problem before we talk about how to bring relations back on a normal track.” The damage inflicted by Mr. Koizumi’s visit to Yasukuni shrine to Japan-China relations was illustrated at the weekend on the fringes of an Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) meeting when Xiang Huaicheng, the Chinese finance minister, declined the meeting with his Japanese counterpart, Masajuro Shiokawa, citing “time constraints.” According to Yan Xuetong, executive director of the institute of international studies at the Tsinghua University, Sino-Japanese relations would be further strained if Tokyo were to revoke article nine of its constitution, which forbids the waging of an offensive war.

2. Japan-ROK Relations

The Nihonkeizai-shinbun (“JAPAN AIMS TO KEEP THE TALKS WITH NORTH KOREA,” Tokyo, 09/07/01) reported that Japan, the US, and the ROK reaffirmed their close cooperation to cope with the DPRK in the high- ranking meeting on September 6. The Japanese government on the same day decided to dispatch a group of inspectors for food aid to the DPRK. According to Nihonkeizai-shinbun, Japan tries to keep the door open to negotiate with the DPRK to avoid its isolation from US-ROK-Japan cooperation system.

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Gee Gee Wong: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Hee-sun: khs688@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hibiki Yamaguchi: hibikiy@dh.mbn.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Rumiko Seya: rumiko- seya@geocities.co.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Hiroya Takagi: hiroya_takagi@hotmail.com
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Chunsi Wu: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au< /a>
Clayton, Australia

 


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