NAPSNet Daily Report 11 January, 2002

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 11 January, 2002", NAPSNet Daily Report, January 11, 2002, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-11-january-2002/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. DPRK-ROK Relations
2. US-Russia Missile Defense Policy
3. US-Japan-ROK Diplomacy
4. PRC-India Relations
5. PRC Domestic Politics
II. Japan 1. DPRK Views of ROK and US
2. Japan-PRC Relations
3. Japan-DPRK Relations
4. Japan-ASEAN Relations
III. PRC 1. ROK-Japan Relations
2. ROK Military Developments
3. Shanghai Cooperation Organization Meeting
4. PRC-US Relations
5. PRC-Russian Relations
6. Cross-Straits Relations

I. United States

1. DPRK-ROK Relations

Reuters (“SOUTH KOREA ENVOYS TO SHORE UP DIPLOMACY TOWARD NORTH,” Seoul, 01/11/02) reported that the ROK’s National Security Council has set restarting ROK-DPRK talks as a top priority for 2002. Foreign Minister Han Seung-soo will visit Japan for the January 21-22 Afghanistan reconstruction meeting of more than 50 states and international organizations. While in Tokyo, Han will discuss DPRK policy with Foreign Minister Makiko Tanaka of Japan. At the end of January, Han is expected to meet US Secretary of State Colin Powell in Washington on how to reopen talks between the DPRK and the US. In late January, the ROK will host US and Japanese officials for a meeting of the Trilateral Coordination and Oversight Group to work out ways to restart the Korean peninsula reconciliation process. ROK’s Yonhap news agency reported on Friday that ROK senior diplomats would be dispatched later this month to Russia and the PRC to seek support in coaxing the DPRK back to the reconciliation process. A foreign ministry spokesman said the visits were under consideration but had not been finalized.

2. US-Russia Missile Defense Policy

The Associated Press (Vladimir Isachenkov, “RUSSIA PASSES ON MISSILE DEFENSE,” Moscow, 01/11/02) reported that while Russia is the only country in the world to have a shield against ballistic missiles over its capital, it has shown no intention of matching the US plan to build a nationwide missile defense system. A senior US State Department official said Thursday that the Bush administration would welcome Russia’s development of its own anti-missile technology for protection against regional threats. He added that the US would be willing to cooperate with Russia in an anti-missile venture. There was no official Russian reaction to the statement Friday. However, Yevgeny Volk, head of the Heritage Foundation’s Moscow office, commented, “It’s an attempt to show that Russia and the US are still partners. It was intended to sweeten the pill for the Russians after recent Pentagon statements.” Other analysts pointed out that Russia sees little sense in building such a system. “Russia has no enemy to protect against and can’t afford such a system anyway,” said retired Lieutenant General Vasily Lata, the former deputy chief of staff of Russia’s Strategic Missile Forces. Lata also said that the Soviet Union had conducted research to develop missile defense system components in the 1980s, but “The research was dropped after we saw that such a system would be too costly and inefficient.”

3. US-Japan-ROK Diplomacy

Reuters (“BUSH MAY VISIT JAPAN AND SOUTH KOREA NEXT MONTH,” Tokyo, Seoul, 01/11/02) reported that Japan and the ROK announced on Friday that US President George W. Bush may make his first visits to Japan and the ROK next month. Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yasuo Fukuda stated, “He had planned to visit in October but postponed the visit after the terrorist incident. He wants to visit Japan as soon as possible and we are making arrangements for him to visit as soon as late next month.” The ROK said that in the second half of February Bush would hold talks with ROK President Kim Dae-jung to strengthen the ROK-US alliance in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

4. PRC-India Relations

Reuters “CHINA’S ZHU ARRIVES IN BANGLADESH AS TENSION SIMMERS,” Dhaka, 01/11/02) reported that PRC Premier Zhu Rongji arrived in Bangladesh on Friday, at the start of a South Asia tour to promote economic ties amid escalating tension between India and Pakistan. A Bangladeshi foreign ministry official said that during Zhu’s two days in Bangladesh before flying to India, he would discuss the military standoff between India and Pakistan. The PRC has repeatedly called for India and Pakistan to resolve their dispute at the negotiating table, and Zhu is not expected to venture far beyond that position. While there, Zhu is also expected to sign bilateral economic agreements in which the PRC offers Bangladesh financial help in building infrastructure including bridges and roads, and supplies military hardware. Zhu was accompanied by Foreign Trade Minister Shi Guangsheng and Labour and Social Security Minister Zhang Zuoji, the official Xinhua news agency said.

5. PRC Domestic Politics

Reuters (“CHINA’S HU CALLS FOR STRONG PROPAGANDA IN KEY YEAR,” Beijing, 01/11/02) reported that the PRC’s Vice President Hu Jintao called on provincial propaganda bosses to ensure state-run media toed the Party line ahead of a key congress meeting set for later this year. Hu declared, “The news media are the mouthpiece of the Party and the people.” Hu added that the media must “work hard to publicize the Party line.” Hu also “called for unifying the thinking of the whole Party and the people… Unified thinking will provide a powerful ideological guarantee for accomplishing this year’s tasks and the successful convening of the 16th Party Congress.”

II. Japan

1. DPRK Views of ROK and US

The Yomiuri Shinbun (Takuji Kawata, “MAIN THREE DPRK PRESSES CRITICIZED US AND ROK,” Seoul, 01/03/02) reported that the Labor Party’s bulletin in DPRK, Nodon Shinmun and other DPRK newspapers, published an annual joint editorial, criticizing the US and the ROK for their maneuvers under the name of anti- terrorism, which is raising tension in the Korean Peninsula. It also called on the US to withdraw the US military from the Korean Peninsula immediately.

2. Japan-PRC Relations

The Yomiuri Shinbun (“REGULAR ECONOMIC CONSULTATIONS WITH PRC,” 01/09/02) reported that Japan is to propose to the PRC that they establish economic consultations. Through regular economic consultations, the Japanese government hopes to prevent economic confrontations that may escalate into political ones. If the PRC agrees, the first meeting will commence in April 2002.

3. Japan-DPRK Relations

The Mainichi Shinbun (“MORE EVIDENCE POINTS TO SUNKEN SHIP ORINGINATING IN N.KOREA,” 01/10/02) reported that a carton of DPRK cigarettes that only high-ranking DPRK officials could afford to buy was one of several items recovered from the seas where the Japan Coast Guard sank a mystery ship last December, authorities said Thursday. Coast Guard officials believe the filtered cigarettes were produced at a factory in Pyongyang as its carton has the name of the DPRK capital printed on it in Hangul. Another item recovered from the area, a bag of sweets, has printed on it “Korea, Pyongyang” in Hangul and “Peanut Candy” in English. It was found in the lifejacket worn by one of three bodies recovered after the ship sank. Land, Infrastructure and Transport Minister, Chikage Ogi, whose ministry oversees the JCG, said the government is examining the items carefully. “We can’t conclude that they belonged to (crewmembers of) the mystery ship at the moment, but they are likely to have originated in North Korea,” Ogi said. “A thorough examination is being carried out.”

4. Japan-ASEAN Relations

The Asahi Shinbun (Masakazu Higashino, “KOIZUMI, ARROYO AGREE TO PUSH ASEAN COOPERATION,” 01/10/02) reported that Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo agreed on Wednesday to strengthen economic relations between Japan and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), including trade, services and investment. The two leaders also agreed to make 2003 the year of international exchange between Japan and ASEAN. Koizumi proposed the hosting of an East Asian development forum centered on the so-called “ASEAN plus three”– ASEAN, Japan, the PRC and the ROK. On the flight to Manila, Koizumi told reporters about his vision for diplomacy in the East Asia. He said he wanted to strengthen ties with nations in Oceania, such as Australia and New Zealand, and increase cooperation with ASEAN. However, in contrast to the PRC, he was less enthusiastic about signing a free-trade agreement with ASEAN countries. Koizumi stated, “There are major differences in the national circumstances and economic power of the ASEAN countries and Japan.”

III. PRC

1. ROK-Japan Relations

People’s Daily (Gao Haorong, “ROK, JAPANESE LEADERS CONSULT ON COOPERATION ISSUES,” Seoul, 01/08/02, P3) reported that ROK President Kim Dae Jung had a telephone conversation with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi on January 7. The two leaders agreed in their conversation that this year is very important in developing bilateral relations. The two sides will strengthen cooperation to ensure the success of the 2002 World Cup soccer finals. Kim and Koizumi also hailed recent achievements in relations, including the resolution of a fishing dispute, the conclusion of a bilateral investment treaty and Japan’s relaxation of visa requirements for ROK citizens visiting the country. Japan and the ROK agreed to work on the last outstanding issue — establishing a panel of experts to discuss history so as to work out differences stemming from a dispute over Japan’s approval last year of school history textbooks that critics say whitewash Japan’s wartime aggression.

2. ROK Military Developments

China Daily (“ROK TO LAUNCH MILITARY SATELLITE,” Seoul, 01/10/02, P11) reported that the ROK’s Ministry of Information and Communication said on January 9 that the ROK will launch its first military satellite in 2005.

People’s Daily (Gao Haorong, “ROK TO PURCHASE US MISSILES,” Seoul, 01/05/02, P3) reported that ROK Defense Ministry announced that the ROK has decided to purchase from the US 111 surface-to- surface tactical missiles with a range of 300 kilometers. This is the first time that the US have sold this kind of AT-ACMS missiles to the ROK, the report said.

3. Shanghai Cooperation Organization Meeting

China Daily (Qi Hua, “SCO OFFICIALS VOW TO PURSUE PEACE,” 01/08/02, P1) reported that the foreign ministers of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) agreed on January 7 to set up a regional counter-terrorism agency and a “mechanism for emergency response.” PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan said that the three tasks facing the SCO are: to maintain close cooperation in Afghan and regional issues; to combat the three vices (terrorism, separatism and extremism) in their own countries; and to formulate the SCO’s constitution in time for the SCO summit in June. SCO members also signed a joint statement pledging to fight international terrorism. PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan told reporters that all members are supportive of the PRC’s position concerning East Turkestan “terrorists” and of Russia’s stance on Chechen “terrorists” and regard these efforts as part and parcel of the international fight against terrorism.

4. PRC-US Relations

People’s Daily (Xu Xingtang, “JIANG ZEMIN MEETS WITH US GUESTS,” Beijing, 01/09/02, P1) reported that PRC President Jiang Zemin said on January 8 that PRC-US relations are critical to regional and global peace, stability and prosperity. Moreover, since both countries share common responsibilities and interests in many areas, the PRC and the US should increase exchanges and cooperation. Jiang made the remarks at a meeting with a US delegation headed by Donald A. Manzullo, a representative to the US Congress. According to Jiang, Manzullo and his colleagues are the first US friends he has met since the beginning of this year. Manzullo said that his visit aims to deepen understanding about the PRC and to promote cooperation between the two countries.

People’s Liberation Army Daily (Chen Gang, “CHI HAOTIAN MEETS WITH US RETIRED GENERALS,” Beijing, 01/08/02, P1) reported that PRC Defense Minister Chi Haotian met with a delegation of retired US generals led by Jack Merritt, president of the Association of the US Army, in Beijing on January 1. During the meeting, Chi said that Taiwan is an issue of major importance and sensitivity in Sino-US relations and directly affects the smooth development of the relations. He said that the PRC will stick to the basic policies of “peaceful reunification” and “one country, two systems,” and the eight-point principle initiated by PRC President Jiang Zemin. Chi said, “Both China and the United States are of great influence in the world, and constructive cooperation will benefit the two countries as well as peace, stability and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region and the world at large.” Chi expressed the hope that the US government will not send Taiwan wrong signals so as not to intensify the tension across the Taiwan Straits and harm Sino-US relations.

5. PRC-Russian Relations

People’s Daily (Wu Yimin, “JIANG ZEMIN MEETS WITH RUSSIAN FOREIGN MINISTER,” Beijing, 01/08/02, P1) reported that PRC President Jiang Zemin met Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov on January 7 in Beijing. During the meeting, Jiang declared that in the new year he would maintain close contact with Russian President Vladimir Putin for the implementation of the bilateral treaty on good-neighborliness and friendship, increase political mutual trust, strengthen economic and trade cooperation, and enhance bilateral strategic coordination in the international arena for global stability and world peace. Ivanov said that Putin also attaches importance to Russian-PRC ties, as the two countries share identical views on the maintenance of strategic stability and other major international issues. He believes that this year’s summit meetings between the top leaders will push forward the growth of bilateral ties.

China Daily (Qi Hua, “STATEMENT CALLS FOR RESTRAINT,” 01/08/02, P1) reported that the PRC and Russia strengthened their cooperation on regional and international issues on January 7 with the signing of a joint statement regarding the tensions between India and Pakistan. The statement called on India and Pakistan to resolve their current crisis through diplomacy. PRC Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan and his Russian counterpart Igor Ivanov expressed their indignation over the terrorist attacks on the Indian parliament and firmly condemned any form of terrorism. The PRC and Russia also expressed their appreciation for the restraint exercised by India and Pakistan, saying such restraint is the way to avoid any further escalation of tension.

6. Cross-Straits Relations

China Daily (Xing Zhigang, “TAIWAN URGED TO EASE POLICY ON MAINLAND TRADE,” 01/09/02, P1) reported that a former senior PRC negotiator with Taiwan on January 8 urged Taiwan to further ease its stringent mainland-trade policy in a bid to strengthen cross- Straits economic ties following Taiwan’s entry into to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Tang Shubei, former executive vice- president of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits, also warned against Taiwan’s attempt to internationalize the Taiwan question by taking advantage of its entry into the WTO. Tang said: “Whether both sides of the Taiwan Straits can seize the opportunity arising from their WTO membership largely depends on how soon and to what degree the Taiwan authorities will adjust their existing management mechanism for mainland trade.” Lu Xiaoyan, assistant director of the Shanghai Research Institute of Taiwan Studies, accused Taiwan authorities of “excessively politicizing” the cross-Straits economic issue by citing security reasons for blocking mainland investment and products. “Taipei has inappropriately magnified the security issue to hold on to its mainland trade policy, which goes against WTO rules,” Lu said.

The NAPSNet Daily Report aims to serve as a forum for dialogue and exchange among peace and security specialists. Conventions for readers and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are available to all recipients. For descriptions of the world wide web sites used to gather information for this report, or for more information on web sites with related information, see the collection of other NAPSNet resources.
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Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:
BK21 The Education and Research Corps for East Asian Studies
Department of Political Science Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Center for American Studies,
Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
International Peace Research Institute (PRIME),
Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan
Monash Asia Institute,
Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Brandon Yu: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Young-soo: yskim328@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hibiki Yamaguchi: hibikiy@dh.mbn.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Saiko Iwata: saiko@akira.ne.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Hiroya Takagi: hiroya_takagi@hotmail.com
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Wu Chunsi: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au< /a>
Clayton, Australia

 


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