NAPSNet Daily Report 07 February, 2002

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 07 February, 2002", NAPSNet Daily Report, February 07, 2002, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-07-february-2002/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. PRC-US Diplomatic Relations
2. US-Philippines Anti-terror War
3. International Missile Conference
4. ROK-DPRK-US Diplomatic Relations
5. Cross-Straits Relations
6. Japan-Russia Islands Settlement
II. Republic of Korea 1. DPRK Missile Issue
2. DPRK–Russia Relations
3. DPRK–US Relations
4. ROK’s Effort for Peace
5. ROK–US Relations
III. Japan 1. Japan-ROK in East Timor
2. ROK-PRC Relations
3. Japan-ROK Relations
4. Japan-RF Relations

I. United States

1. PRC-US Diplomatic Relations

Agence France-Presse (“CIA CHIEF FIRES NEW CHINA WARNING,” 02/07/02) reported that US CIA chief George Tenet testified before Congress that the PRC’s recent acquiescence in the US anti-terror campaign did not mean it had taken its eye from its prime goal: to emerge as a major Asian power and challenge US strategic preeminence in Asia. Tenet warned, “China is developing an increasingly competitive economy and building a modern military force with the ultimate objective of asserting itself as a great power in East Asia. And although Beijing joined the coalition against terrorism, it remains deeply skeptical of US intentions in South Asia.” Tenet also commented on the PRC’s imminent political transition, “Each of the contenders in the succession contest will be obliged to avoid any hint of being ‘soft’ on the United States.”

2. US-Philippines Anti-terror War

Agence France-Presse (“US ANTI-EXTREMIST TROOPS BANNED FROM UNILATERAL OPERATIONS IN PHILIPPINES,” Manila, 02/07/02) reported US troops are to be barred from combat and unilateral action during joint counter- extremist operations in the southern Philippines, according to a draft agreement set to be signed by the two governments. The “terms of reference” would allow the US armed forces to insert 160 Special Forces troops on the island of Basilan. Philippine officials said that it would take effect when signed by Filipino Vice President Teofisto Guingona, the concurrent foreign secretary, and Robert Fitts, Charge d’affaires of the US embassy here. The proposed terms of reference state that “in no instance will US forces operate independently during field training exercises”, and “US exercise participants shall not engage in combat operations, without prejudice to their right of self- defense”. It added: “US exercise forces at all levels shall comply with the operational instructions of the AFP unit commander and at no instance shall they operate independently within (Philippine) territory.” American troops would also be barred from building “permanent US basing and support facilities.”

3. International Missile Conference

The Associated Press (Pamela Sampson, “MISSILE CONFERENCE OPENS IN PARIS,” Paris, 02/07/02) reported that several nations, including India and Pakistan, are meeting in Paris for two days to help produce a set of international guidelines aimed at curbing the proliferation of ballistic missiles. Gerard Errera, the French Foreign Ministry’s deputy director of political affairs, said in opening the conference Thursday that he hoped the ‘International Code of Conduct against the Proliferation of Ballistic Missiles’ would become an important instrument in the quest for world stability and peace. “The fact that so many accepted our invitation is a reason for optimism,” he said. “This is a sign that the international community has assessed the challenges that are tied to the development – qualitative and quantitative – of ballistic capabilities.” The goal of the conference is to solicit feedback from participants on a proposed code of conduct that would recognize the need to curb missile proliferation and share information about missile testing. The code would also call on nations to exercise “maximum restraint” in the development and deployment of ballistic missiles. Conference participants include the US, Russia, Britain, France, the PRC, India, Pakistan and Israel. According to French diplomatic sources, only two countries refused invitations: the DPRK and Syria.

4. ROK-DPRK-US Diplomatic Relations

The Associated Press (Choe Sang-hun, “U.S., SOUTH KOREA PLAYING DOWN RIFT,” Seoul, 02/07/02) and Agence France-Presse (“SOUTH KOREA LEADER ORDERS ACTION ON POLICY RIFT WITH US,” 02/07/02) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-Jung ordered action to narrow policy differences with the US over how to handle the DPRK ahead of a meeting with President George W. Bush. “There are some matters which will require urgent coordination before the summit,” said an official statement. At a dinner Wednesday with ROK envoys abroad, President Kim admitted for the first time that there was a gap between the ROK and the US. “There can be policy differences between allies but anti-US sentiment is not good for our national interest,” Kim said. US Secretary of State Colin Powell said Thursday that despite Bush’s remarks, the US remains committed to helping the ROK pursue its DPRK policy. “The United States fully supports your government’s policy of engagement with North Korea and believes that North-South rapprochement is essential to lowering tensions and establishing lasting stability on the peninsula,” Powell expressed.

5. Cross-Straits Relations

The China Post (“TAIWAN HOPES CROSS-STRAIT TRADING RESOLVES UNDER WTO,” 02/07/02) reported that the top Taiwan official on mainland affairs Deng Chen-chung, vice chairman of the Mainland Affairs Council (MAC), said yesterday in Washington that economic and trading disputes between Taiwan and the PRC should be resolved under the framework of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Deng stated, “We should make good use of the communication channels set by the WTO in an effort to better deal with the cross-strait trading problems.” PRC Vice Premier Qian Qichen said on January 24 that the two sides’ entrances into the WTO have offered both Taiwan and the PRC a sound opportunity to enhance cross-strait commercial ties. However, Qian also stressed that all cross-straits disputes should be resolved between only the PRC and Taiwan.

6. Japan-Russia Islands Settlement

Agence France-Presse (“JAPAN IN FRESH PLEDGE TO WIN BACK RUSSIAN-HELD ISLANDS,” 02/07/02) reported that Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi renewed a pledge to settle a decades-old row with Russia over the return of Russian-held islands, but admitted negotiating with Russia required patience and tenacity. “There is no change in our policy that Russia should make it clear that the four islands belong to Japan,” Koizumi said Thursday. Koizumi stated, “We should not become impatient. We must negotiate with Russia with tenacity. We should not give up our hope. I will make all my efforts to settle the territorial issue and then sign a peace treaty.” Newly appointed Foreign Minister Yoriko Kawaguchi said that her ministry would continue to do its utmost to resolve the issue. “We want to solve this issue as soon as we can,” Kawaguchi said. Kawaguchi recently held talks with Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov but the two made little progress on the territorial row except to agree to hold a bilateral vice foreign ministerial meeting in Moscow in March.

II. Republic of Korea

1. DPRK Missile Issue

Joongang Ilbo (Kim Min-seok, “NORTH’S MISSILE EXPORTS SPREAD GLOBAL INSTABILITY, U.S. ASSERTS,” Seoul, 02/07/02) reported that in testimony before the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday, US Secretary of State Colin Powell said the US government is dissatisfied with DPRK’s continuous development and export of missiles, despite the DPRK’s agreement with the moratorium on missile testing until 2003. The US is particularly concerned that the DPRK’s Rodong missiles, exported to Iran, threaten US troops in the Middle East, and the missile technology transferred to Pakistan complicates India-Pakistan relations.

2. DPRK–Russia Relations

Joongang Ilbo (“NORTH AND RUSSIA TO REINFORCE TIES IN VARIOUS FIELDS,” Seoul, 02/07/02) reported that spokesperson of foreign affairs department Lee Ju-kwan stated that the DPRK and Russia are satisfied with the development of bilateral ties between the two states and are pursuing the further enhancement of ties. Lee said the DPRK and Russia are taking practical steps for long-term exchange and cooperation in various sectors from military to economy, technology and culture.

3. DPRK–US Relations

Joongang Ilbo (Kim Jin, “TALKS UP TO NORTH, POWELL SAYS,” Washington, 02/07/02) reported that US Secretary of State Colin Powel said Tuesday that the “ball” is now in the DPRK’s court. At a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Powell argued that Bush’s identification of an “axis of evil” was justifiable, but that the move was not a signal of imminent military action against one of those states. Striking back at the Bush administration, the DPRK Foreign Ministry warned, “This situation compels the DPRK to further increase its independent defense capabilities.” T he official Central News Agency quoted a ministry spokesperson saying, “The US calls for nonproliferation of missiles, but its real position is that only missiles of its enemy states, not its allies, pose problems.”

4. ROK’s Effort for Peace

The Korea Herald (Shin Yong-bae, “N. KOREA TO GET ECONOMIC BENEFITS IF IT RETURNS TO TALKS,” Seoul, 02/07/02) reported that the US plans to help DPRK gain access to key international lending organizations if the DPRK returns to security talks with the US. “North Korea will be given various economic benefits, such as development funds from international financial institutions, if it resumes dialogue with the United States,” said Yim Sung-joon, senior presidential secretary for foreign policy and national security. The DPRK has requested soft loans from the World Bank and other international lending agencies to resuscitate its moribund economy. But since DPRK is on the US list of states sponsoring terrorism, the US has blocked DPRK’s efforts to access the loans. Yim said the resumption of talks to discuss DPRK’s weapons of mass destruction, including missiles, will help the U.S. and DPRK normalize their political relations.

5. ROK–US Relations

The Korea Herald (Kim Ji-ho, “U.S. ENVOY VOICES ‘STRONG SUPPOT’ FOR SUNSHINE POLICY,” Seoul, 02/07/02) reported that US ambassador to the ROK Thomas Hubbard Wednesday voiced “strong support” for President Kim Dae-jung’s policy of pursuing rapprochement with DPRK, in an apparent bid to refute reports about signs of a widening gap between US and ROK policies toward the DPRK. After US President George W. Bush labeled the DPRK part of an “axis of evil” and State Department spokesman Richard Boucher criticized ROK’s “sunshine policy,” there has been speculation that the policies of ROK and US may not be in alignment. However, Hubbard said the Bush administration fully supports President Kim’s engagement policy.

III. Japan

1. Japan-ROK in East Timor

The Asahi Shinbun (SDF GROUP HEADING TO E. TIMOR,” 02/04/02) reported that the Japanese government will dispatch to East Timor the largest contingent of Self-Defense Forces (SDF) personnel ever. The Cabinet is expected to approve the plan by February 15, and the operations, scheduled to continue for about half a year until August 20, could be extended to up to two years if necessary, government sources said. The SDF members will engage in repair and maintenance of roads and bridges, as well as disaster assistance, in East Timor, the sources said. The troops will be posted at four places, mostly near the border with West Timor. Since a ROK unit is already stationed at one of the planned sites, it is expected that Japanese and ROK troops will collaborate for the first time in a UN peacekeeping mission.

2. ROK-PRC Relations

The Asahi Shinbun (Koichi Furuya, “WORLD CUP STOP IN SEOUL FOR JIANG,” Beijing, 02/06/02) reported that PRC President Jiang Zemin will not be attending the opening ceremony of the 2002 World Cup in Seoul, according to PRC government sources. The ROK had desired Jiang to make the trip as a fitting tribute to the 10th anniversary of the opening of diplomatic ties between the PRC and the ROK.

3. Japan-ROK Relations

The Yomiuri Shinbun (“JOINT HISTORY PANEL IN SIGHT,” 02/07/02) reported that the Japanese and ROK governments on Wednesday reached a broad agreement on the framework for a joint research project for deepening both nations’ understanding of their shared history, sources said. The project, designed to promote joint history research by Japan and the ROK, will consist of a history research committee comprised of 10 historians from both countries. In addition to the committee, the two governments will promote exchanges between Japanese and ROK historians at a meeting, and a supporting administrative committee will be set up by officials from both nations to assist in the running of the project. The project will be officially approved by both countries when Koizumi visits Seoul around March 21.

4. Japan-RF Relations The Yomiuri Shinbun (JAPAN, RF MEETING AT VICE-MINISTER LEVEL,” 02/07/02) reported that Japan and the RF decided yesterday to have the meeting at vice-foreign ministerial level over the Northern Territories disputes in Moscow on March 12 and 13.

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Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:

BK21 The Education and Research Corps for East Asian Studies
Department of Political Science, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Center for American Studies,
Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

International Peace Research Institute (PRIME),
Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan

Monash Asia Institute,
Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Brandon Yu: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Young-soo: yskim328@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hibiki Yamaguchi: hibikiy@dh.mbn.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Saiko Iwata: saiko@akira.ne.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Hiroya Takagi: hiroya_takagi@hotmail.com
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Wu Chunsi: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au< /a>
Clayton, Australia

 


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