NAPSNet Daily Report 07 December, 2001

Recommended Citation

"NAPSNet Daily Report 07 December, 2001", NAPSNet Daily Report, December 07, 2001, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-07-december-2001/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. ROK Role in Afghanistan
2. ROK-US Relations
3. Japan’s Role in Afghanistan Reconstruction
4. Wen Ho Lee Testimony
II. Republic of Korea 1. ROK-PRC Talks
2. ROK’s Role in Afghanistan
3. ROK Policy toward DPRK
4. PRC Position on Korean Peninsula
5. US Calls for Talks to DPRK
6. Aid to DPRK
7. Light-water Reactors Project

I. United States

1. ROK Role in Afghanistan

The Korea Times (Sohn Suk-joo, “SEOUL TO SEND NON-COMBAT TROOPS AROUND DEC. 20,” 12/07/01) reported that the ROK National Assembly passed a bill that allows for the dispatching of ROK non-combat troops to Afghanistan. The bill cleared the way for the immediate deployment of medical, navy and air force units. Following its passage, the ROK Defense Ministry announced that it would send a navy transport unit, composed of one landing ship tank (LST) and about 150 personnel, to a Southeast Asian nation as early as December 20, when the Air Force’s four C-130 cargo planes will also be ready to fly over to Australia, Singapore, Diego Garcia and Thailand. ROK Brigade General Hwang Eui- don, spokesman for the ministry, noted, “The U.S. officially asked our government to dispatch one 4,300 ton-class landing ship tank and four C- 130 cargo planes to help the anti-terror war.” The air force transport team, which will consist of four C-130 cargo planes and about 170 members, will be stationed in Kimhae near Pusan, and be on stand-by to help transport military goods for the US Pacific Command, ministry officials said. [Ed. note: This article appeared in the US Department of Defense’s Early Bird news service for December 7, 2001.]

2. ROK-US Relations

Asia Pulse (“US ENVOY SUMS UP VISA POLICY TOWARDS SOUTH KOREA,” 12/07/01) reported that US ambassador to the ROK Thomas C. Hubbard said that the US is expected to maintain its current visa policy towards the ROK. Hubbard noted although the number of visa applications being processed by the consulate office was higher than any other US mission abroad, an average 95 percent of applicants here receive visas. He added that at present, ROK citizens do not have to wait that long to get visas and that the US government was satisfied with the current policy in this field. Meanwhile, Hubbard also said that though a bilateral investment treaty was being explored between the ROK and the US, there was no urgency to start negotiations for a free trade agreement (FTA). He stressed, “Washington is working on an FTA with Chile and Singapore, but our primary concern is to implement the trading order outlined by the World Trade Organization’s New Round of multilateral trade scheme.”

3. Japan’s Role in Afghanistan Reconstruction

Agence France-Presse (“JAPAN PASSES BILL TO BEEF UP UN PEACEKEEPING ROLE,” 12/07/01) reported that legislation to upgrade Japan’s support for UN peacekeeping operations became law after being passed by the upper house of parliament. The bill was voted through by 197 votes to 42 with no abstentions. Members of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces may now defend not only themselves, but those under their protection such as international aid workers and refugees. With the passage of the legislation, Japan hopes to dispatch its troops to Afghanistan as soon as the focus shifts to rebuilding the country under UN auspices.

Agence France-Presse (“JAPANESE PREMIER HEADS TO BELGIUM FOR ANTI-TERROR TALKS WITH EU LEADERS,” 12/07/01) reported that Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi left for Brussels for a summit with Belgian Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt and European Commission President Romano that is expected to focus on the reconstruction of Afghanistan. A spokesperson for the EU delegation in Tokyo said that the EU commissioners for external affairs and trade, Chris Patten and Pascal Lamy, as well as Javier Solana, the EU’s High Representive for Foreign and Security Policy, were tentatively slated to join the talks. After the Brussels meeting, Koizumi and his partners are scheduled to issue three documents–a joint press statement on Japan-EU relations, an “action plan” for Japan-US cooperation, and a joint anti-terrorism statement.

4. Wen Ho Lee Testimony

The Associated Press (Richard Benke, “WEN HO LEE TESTIFIES IN LAWSUIT,” Albuquerque, 12/7/01) reported that nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee testified that he was a scapegoat for Energy Department security lapses and never knew why. Former Energy Department counterintelligence chief Notra Trulock is suing Lee, claiming the Taiwanese-born scientist defamed him with allegations that Lee was targeted because of his race. Lee denied making any statements about Trulock and said under questioning that he did not know whether he was singled out for selective prosecution, ethnic profiling or racial discrimination. “Even today I don’t know why I was investigated by the government,” Lee said, testifying for the first time since his release from jail last year.

II. Republic of Korea

1. ROK-PRC Talks

The Korea Herald (Hwang Jang-jin, “DEFENSE MINISTER TO VISIT CHINA, VIETNAM DEC. 13-21,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that the ROK Defense Ministry said Thursday that ROK Defense Minister Kim Dong-shin will visit the PRC and Vietnam from December 13-21 to promote military cooperation and exchange. During his stay in the PRC, Kim will meet with his PRC counterpart Chi Haotian to discuss the security situation in Northeast Asia and on the Korean Peninsula, bilateral defense cooperation and other issues of mutual concern. Kim will meet with other PRC military and political leaders including Fu Quanyou, chief of the General Staff of the PRC’s People’s Liberation Army. “In meetings with Chinese military leaders, Minister Kim will request China’s help for the reduction of military tension on the Korean Peninsula,” said Kim Kwang-woo, director of the ROK’s Foreign Affairs Division. The ROK is also expected to propose exchange visits by top-brass military officials and regular talks between working-level officials.

2. ROK’s Role in Afghanistan

The Korea Herald (Hwang Jang-jin, “U.S. REQUESTS SOUTH KOREAN TRANSPORT UNITS FOR ANTI-TERRORISM WAR IN AFGHANISTAN,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that the ROK Defense Ministry said Thursday that in addition to the medics and liaison officers it requested last month, the US has asked the ROK to dispatch sea and air transport craft and personnel to assist its military campaign in Afghanistan. The ROK National Assembly approved the government’s plan to dispatch about 500 non-combat personnel in support of the US war on terrorism during a plenary session Thursday. ROK ministry spokesperson Brigade General Hwang Eui-don stated, “The nation will be fully ready by December 20 to send troops for medical and logistical support as requested by the United States.” The two sides have yet to conclude other details including command system, timing and places for deployment, and the ROK troops’ specific role in the campaign, he added.

3. ROK Policy toward DPRK

The Korea Herald (Shin Yong-bae, “KIM VOWS TO PURSUE ‘SUNSHINE POLICY’,” Oslo, 12/07/01) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung said Thursday that he would promote his “sunshine” policy toward the DPRK with patience, despite recent setbacks in inter-Korean relations. “Although inter-Korean relations are in a stalemate now, I, along with the people of Korea, am convinced that the path toward success will open again without fail, if we make our utmost efforts with patience and consistency,” Kim said in a keynote address at the Nobel Peace Prize Centennial Symposium.

4. PRC Position on Korean Peninsula

The Korea Herald (Kim Ji-ho, “KOREAN PEACE TOP PRIORITY FOR CHINA,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that PRC Ambassador to the ROK Li Bin reaffirmed Thursday the PRC’s pledge to play a “constructive” role in promoting peace and reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula. “Peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula will serve the fundamental interests of China,” Li said in a speech at the inaugural ceremony of the ROK-PRC Forum, a research group composed of about 70 lawmakers. Li said that the PRC has maintained its position that inter-Korean issues should be resolved through dialogue between the two Koreas, and that neighboring countries must create an environment favorable for the rapprochement process.

5. US Calls for Talks to DPRK

Joongang Ilbo (Choi Won-ki, “U.S. AMBASSADOR HUBBARD URGES KIM JONG-IL FOR RETURN VISIT,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that US Ambassador to the ROK Thomas Hubbard, in a speech during a luncheon meeting hosted by the American Chamber of Commerce in Korea on Thursday, urged DPRK leader Kim Jong-il to keep his early promise of a return visit to Seoul. Expressing disappointment toward the recent stalemate in inter-Korean relations, Hubbard added that it would be great if Kim kept his earlier pledge to visit Seoul for the second summit. Hubbard then reconfirmed the US position that the US administration remains willing to hold dialogue with the DPRK any time, any place and without any preconditions.

6. Aid to DPRK

Joongang Ilbo (Kim Hee-sung, “WORLD BANK OFFICIAL STRESSES TO INTENSIFY AID TO N.K.,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that the senior advisor of Korean Peninsula division at the World Bank Bradley O. Babson said that international financial institutions such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund should take a more active role in financially assisting the DPRK. Babson pointed out that one of the crucial issues that the two Koreas must tackle is to narrow the economic disparity between the two countries. In order to do this, Babson said that the DPRK must increase its economic relations not just with the ROK but also with the PRC, Japan, Russia and other nations.

7. Light-water Reactors Project

Chosun Ilbo (Heo Yong-beom, “KEDO PUSHES NK TO COMPLY WITH NUCLEAR DIRECTIVES,” Seoul, 12/07/01) reported that Charles Kartman, the Executive Director of the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization, said Thursday that the construction of light-water reactors (LWR) in the DPRK will not be completed unless the DPRK fully complies with its obligations to have its nuclear facilities inspected. Upon returning from a four-day visit to the DPRK from December 1-4, Kartman said that only when the DPRK fully complies with the inspections stated in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of the Geneva Agreement, secures power transmission and substation facilities for the nuclear plant, and guarantees the safety of construction companies participating in the LWR project, would the DPRK receive the key nuclear components necessary to make the reactors operational.

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Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:
International Policy Studies Institute Seoul, Republic of Korea
Center for American Studies,
Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
International Peace Research Institute (PRIME),
Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan
Monash Asia Institute,
Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Brandon Yu: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Hee-sun: khs688@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hibiki Yamaguchi: hibikiy@dh.mbn.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Rumiko Seya: rumiko- seya@geocities.co.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Hiroya Takagi: hiroya_takagi@hotmail.com
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Wu Chunsi: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au< /a>
Clayton, Australia

 


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