NAPSNet Daily Report 01 March, 2004

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"NAPSNet Daily Report 01 March, 2004", NAPSNet Daily Report, March 01, 2004, https://nautilus.org/napsnet/napsnet-daily-report/napsnet-daily-report-01-march-2004/

 
CONTENTS

I. United States

1. DPRK Six-Way Talks
2. DPRK Six-Way Talks Chairman’s Report
3. US on Six-Party Talks
4. DPRK on Six-Way Talks
5. PRC on DPRK Six-Way Talks
6. Japan on DPRK Six-Way Talks
7. Russia on Six-Way Talks
8. ROK-US-Japan Post-Six-Party Talks Meetings
9. DPRK-Pakistan Nuclear Connection
10. Inter-Korean Economic Talks
12. PRC Response to US Human Rights Report
13. US Role in Cross-Straits Relations
14. Cross-Straits Relations
15. ROK-Japan Relations

I. United States

1. DPRK Six-Way Talks

Associated Press (Joe McDonald, “TALKS ON NORTH KOREA NUCLEAR PROGRAM END,” Beijing, 02/28/04) reported that a meeting of six nations to discuss the dispute over the DPRK’s nuclear program sputtered to an end Saturday with no breakthroughs announced but with an agreement to try again and create working groups to help. After four days of often conflicting developments, the PRC’s Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing said “various serious differences” remain before the standoff can be resolved but he called for patience. “Some people think that not enough progress was made,” Li said at a closing ceremony. “But the speed of these negotiations is not very fast. … The will of the participants is the most important thing, and the will of these participants is to seek peace.” He added: “We must use a constructive attitude to narrow differences and expand common ground through dialogue, to resolve the issue, although differences are on the road ahead.” The foreign minister, whose country hosted the talks, said the six governments had agreed to set up working groups to discuss how to go forward. Li also said consensus had been reached on holding another round of senior-level talks, although no date was announced.

Washington Post (Philip P. Pan, “N. KOREA RETREATS FROM OFFER ON NUCLEAR PLANS OFFICIALS SCUTTLE HOPES FOR FREEZE, DECLARING INTENT TO KEEP UP CIVILIAN ENERGY INDUSTRY,” Beijing, 02/29/04) reported that six-nation talks on the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program ended Saturday with little progress as the DPRK backed away from an earlier offer of a freeze and declared instead it intends to maintain a civilian nuclear energy industry. The DPRK also blocked the adoption of a joint declaration calling for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula by insisting on minor changes at the last minute, forcing the PRC to issue a less formal statement. But the six governments agreed to set up a working-level group to continue the negotiations in the coming months and pledged to hold a third round of talks before July. Diplomats from all of the countries, including the DPRK, said the four days of discussions had been useful and were more substantive than talks in August. A senior US official, briefing reporters here on the condition he not be identified, said that the US succeeded in persuading Japan, the ROK, the PRC and Russia to accept a goal of the “complete, verifiable and irreversible” dismantling of the DPRK’s nuclear programs. Diplomats involved in the talks said the DPRK retreat on its offer to freeze its nuclear programs was a significant setback. In December and again in January, the DPRK offered to freeze its nuclear weapons program, as well as its civilian nuclear industry, in exchange for economic aid and security guarantees. But Kim said his government is now proposing to freeze and dismantle only its military nuclear programs. “We do have an atomic power industry which has a lot of purposes, and we cannot give it up,” Kim said. “We need this nuclear energy in different aspects. We need it in medical areas. We needed it in agricultural areas as well as for electricity. We cannot afford to forgo all these activities.” During the talks, the North Koreans were pressed repeatedly to explain their civilian program but were evasive, one diplomat said. A key question is whether the North Koreans are willing to freeze a reactor at Yongbyon. They claim it supplies heat to local residents but have also said it is used to produce fuel rods from which weapons-grade plutonium is extracted at a nearby facility. At one point in the talks, the diplomat said, the North Koreans suggested they would freeze the facility, an indication they wanted to keep the Yongbyon reactor operational.

New York Times (Joseph Kahn, “US AND NORTH KOREA AGREE TO MORE TALKS,” Beijing, 02/29/04) reported that the US and the DPRK said Saturday that they were committed to deepening negotiations over the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program, ending four days of inconclusive discussions with an unusual show of conciliation. Senior Bush administration officials and Kim Kye Kwan, the DPRK’s top negotiator at the six-nation talks here, said that while their main differences remained unresolved, the talks had proved useful. They pledged to meet in smaller working groups soon and hold another formal session before the end of June. “We had substantive discussions about the nuclear issue with the goal being the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula,” Kim said, in a rare news conference at the DPRK Embassy here. “My delegation has adopted a businesslike attitude with the intention of resolving the issue peacefully through dialogue and negotiations.” He accused the US of maintaining a “hostile policy” and blamed it for the lack of a breakthrough. Still, his criticism was not as sharp as the message the DPRK sent after sessions in April and August, when its negotiators said they planned to abandon talks and expand the nuclear program. No understanding was reached on how to end the DPRK’s nuclear program. In some areas, including the DPRK’s new insistence on retaining a civilian nuclear power program and its firm denials that it has been developing fuel from enriched uranium, the gap appeared wider now than before the talks began. But representatives of all six nations said the tone of the talks had changed, with many saying that the risk of a rapid deployment of nuclear arms by the DPRK, or a pre-emptive attack by the US, had receded, at least for now. Also significant, American officials said, is that the DPRK committed itself publicly to eventually dismantling its nuclear program, though under terms the American side has rejected. “The DPRK did say that they will dismantle their nuclear program, though the devil is in the details,” said a senior Bush administration official involved with the talks.

2. DPRK Six-Way Talks Chairman’s Report

Korea Times (“WORKING GROUP TO PRESS FOR DIALOGUE PROCESS,” 03/01/04) reported that the following is the full text of the chairman’s statement for the second round of six-party talks over North Korea’s nuclear problem:

The second round of six-party talks was held in Beijing among the People’s Republic of China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the US of America from 25th to 28th of February, 2004.

The heads of delegations were Mr. Wang Yi, Vice Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of PRC; Mr. Kim Gye Gwan, Vice Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of DPRK; Ambassador Mitoji Yabunaka, Director-General for the Asian and Oceanian Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan; Ambassador Lee Soo-hyuck, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the ROK; Ambassador A. Losyukov, Vice Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Russia; Mr. James A. Kelly, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, US Department of State.

The Parties agreed that the second round of the six-party talks had launched the discussion on substantive issues, which was beneficial and positive, and that the attitudes of all parties were serious in the discussion. While differences remained, the parties enhanced their understanding of each other’s position through the talks.

The parties expressed their commitment to a nuclear-weapon-free Korean peninsula, and to resolving the nuclear issue peacefully through dialogue in a spirit of mutual respect and consultation on an equal basis, so as to maintain peace and stability on the Korean peninsula and the region at large.

The parties expressed their willingness to coexist peacefully. They agreed to take coordinated steps to address the nuclear issue and the related concerns.

The Parties agreed to continue the process of the talks and agreed in principle to hold the third round of the six-party talks in Beijing no later than the end of the second quarter of 2004. They agreed to set up a working group in preparation for the plenary session. The terms of reference of the working group will be established through diplomatic channels.

The delegations of the DPRK, Japan, the ROK, Russia and the USA have expressed their appreciation to the PRC side for the efforts aimed at the successful staging of the two rounds of the six-party talks.

3. US on Six-Party Talks

US Department of State (Richard Boucher, ” Six-Party Talks on DPRK Nuclear Program,” Washington DC, 02/28/04) reported that the US welcomes the results of the second round of Six-Party talks, which were held in Beijing Feb. 25-28. At this round, the parties had very serious discussions on the comprehensive denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, including the need for the complete irreversible and verifiable dismantlement of the DPRK nuclear programs, both plutonium and uranium-enrichment based. While key differences remain that will need to be addressed in further rounds of discussions, this round of talks made progress on a regularized process for the peaceful and diplomatic resolution of this issue. The parties agreed to hold another round of talks by the end of the second quarter of this year and to establish a working group to address, and attempt to resolve, detailed issues in between plenary sessions. We worked closely with our partners in the talks and were pleased with the high degree of cooperation among us. In particular, we would like to thank the PRC Government for not only participating fully in the talks, but also for its exemplary diplomatic efforts in organizing and hosting the talks. We hope that North Korea will work with the five other parties to achieve a satisfactory resolution to the problems created by its pursuit of nuclear weapons.

4. DPRK on Six-Way Talks

Korea Central News Agency (“DPRK FOREIGN MINISTRY SPOKESMAN ON SIX-WAY TALKS,” Pyongyang, 02/29/04) reported that a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry of the DPRK today gave the following answer to a question put by KCNA as regards the six-way talks held in Beijing: The six-way talks on the nuclear issue between the DPRK and the US took place in Beijing from February 25 to 28. We attended the talks with expectation that a frank discussion on ways of seeking a solution to the nuclear issue between the DPRK and the US would open a certain prospect of settling the issue. Hence, we showed greatest magnanimity, clarifying its transparent will to scrap its nuclear program according to a proposal for a simultaneous package solution aimed to denuclearize the Korean peninsula and advancing fair and flexible proposals for implementing measures for the first-phase actions. The PRC, Russia, and other participants in the talks, therefore, expressed support and understanding of our reasonable proposal. However, the US again insisted on its old assertion about the DPRK’s abandoning its nuclear program first, saying that it can discuss the DPRK’s concerns only when it completely scraps its nuclear program in a verifiable and irreversible manner. This threw a big hurdle in the way of the talks. It also absurdly asserted that it can not normalize relations with the DPRK unless missile, conventional weapons, biological and chemical weapons, human rights and other issues are settled even after its abandonment of all its nuclear programs. The attitude of the US side towards the talks increased our disappointment. The US side unhesitatingly said that it was not willing to negotiate with the DPRK, far from showing any sincere intention to settle the issue. The head of its delegation only read the prepared script without stammering and showed no sincerity, giving no answer even to the questions raised. The US did not show any stand to co-exist with the DPRK in peace as it did during the six-way talks held in August last year but once again disclosed its ulterior aim to persistently pursue its policy of isolating and stifling the DPRK, wasting time behind the scene of the dialogue. The US seems to calculate that the DPRK will collapse of its own accord if it wastes time, putting pressure upon the DPRK undergoing economic difficulties. This is little short of a behavior of a bat-blind person who knows nothing of the DPRK. In spite of this situation we consented to the time to open the next round of the six-way talks and to the issue of organizing a working group proceeding from the sincere and patient stand to seek a negotiated peaceful solution of the nuclear issue at any cost. It is difficult to expect that any further talks would help find a solution to the issue. The settlement of the nuclear issue will entirely depend on the change in the US attitude.

5. PRC on DPRK Six-Way Talks

Agence France-Presse (“US HAPPY, BUT CHINA SAYS “SEVERE” DIFFERENCES REMAIN AS NUCLEAR TALKS END,” 02/29/04) reported that six-nation talks on the DPRK’s nuclear weapons program ended with the US expressing satisfaction but the PRC warning that “severe” differences remained. The PRC had been pushing hard for some sort of joint document as the bare minimum from the talks, which started Wednesday. Neither the US nor the DPRK gave any ground, with both sticking to their hardline positions, prompting PRC Foreign Minister Li Zhaoxing to say “severe” differences remained. “The Korean peninsula nuclear issue involves historical and current contradictions which intertwine with each other,” he said at the closing ceremony. “Currently differences, even severe differences, still exist.” The PRC’s chief negotiator Wang Yi blamed the standoff on a lack of mutual trust. “The main point is that both sides lack mutual trust,” he said. “That is why we need to have this process of enhancing their mutual trust and narrowing their differences through dialogue.”

6. Japan on DPRK Six-Way Talks

Agence France-Presse (“JAPAN SATISFIED OVER SECOND ROUND OF SIX-WAY TALKS,” Tokyo, 02/29/04) reported that Japan’s government have expressed satisfaction with the outcome of the six-way talks on the DPRK nuclear crisis and underlined its resolve to stick to its position in future rounds. “Japan will not change its position and will remain tenacious during future talks,” Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told reporters in his first comment on the talks that ended Saturday in Beijing. “I understand that (the Beijing talks) was a very tough meeting, but we were able to agree on holding the next round of talks. I told (Japan’s diplomats) to work hard in order to achieve our goals,” Koizumi said after meeting the leader of the Japanese delegation Mitoji Yabunaka. The government’s top spokesman, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda said the agreement to hold another round of talks “shows that the six-nation framework has been institutionalised.” “I think we can say that was a step forward,” he told a regular press briefing.

7. Russia on Six-Way Talks

Reuters (“RUSSIA WARNS OF WORSENING N.KOREA SITUATION,” Moscow, 02/29/04) reported that Russia’s representative at the six-party talks on the DPRK’s nuclear program said on Sunday the impasse could aggravate the situation and ultimately lead to military intervention. Alexander Losyukov was quoted by Russia’s Itar-Tass news agency on his return from the second round of talks as saying the meeting had produced no concrete or practical movement toward resolution of the row. “If this goes on, mistrust will grow on the Korean peninsula. The situation could be aggravated and military intervention is possible,” he said. “There could be attempts to blockade or limit North Korea’s relations with other countries. All this could seriously worsen the situation.”

8. ROK-US-Japan Post-Six-Party Talks Meetings

Yonhap (“ROK FOREIGN MINISTER TO VISIT US, JAPAN,” Seoul, 03/01/04) reported that ROK Foreign Minister Ban Ki-moon will make a trip to the US and Japan to exchange views with his counterparts on the just-ended six-party talks on North Korea’s nuclear program and other issues, officials said Monday 1 March. Ban will leave for the US on Wednesday for a four-day visit, which will be followed by a two-day trip to Japan. He will meet with US Secretary of State Colin Powell in Washington DC on Wednesday. Ban will also hold a forum with the Korea Caucus, a group of congressmen interested in Korea-related issues, and meet with senators or congressmen to seek their understanding of the six-party dialogue framework. After flying to Japan on 7 March, he will meet with his Japanese counterpart Yoriko Kawaguchi and pay a courtesy call on Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. The two foreign ministers are scheduled to exchange opinions on talks for free trade and visa exemption agreements, according to officials.

9. DPRK-Pakistan Nuclear Connection

Los Angeles Times (Paul Watson and Mubashir Zaidi, “DEATH OF N. KOREAN WOMAN OFFERS CLUES TO PAKISTANI NUCLEAR DEALS,” Islambad, 03/01/04) reported that ten days after Pakistan tested its first atomic bomb in 1998, the wife of a major DPRK arms dealer was shot to death near the heavily guarded home here of the nuclear program’s leader, Abdul Qadeer Khan. Authorities hushed up the mysterious shooting of Kim Sa Nae, and it was more than a year before news broke that she was probably killed by North Koreans. After Khan’s confession in early February that he secretly sold nuclear weapons technology to the DPRK, Iran and Libya, Kim’s death is taking on a new meaning as fresh details emerge. Pakistan’s government and military say that Khan and at least seven associates were motivated by greed and acted without official knowledge or approval. But details of Kim’s death on June 7, 1998. Khan is now under house arrest in Rawalpindi, a high-security garrison town on the edge of Islamabad, which is home to many senior military and government officials. Kim was shot at point-blank range, a few yards from Khan’s house in the neighborhood known as E-7, a senior police officer said in an interview. Kim previously has been described as the wife of a mid-ranking DPRK diplomat. But present and former staff members at Khan Research Laboratories, or KRL, the Pakistani scientist’s weapons development facility about 20 miles southeast of Islamabad, say that was a cover story. The officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said Kim was part of a 20-member delegation of DPRK engineers and scientists whom Khan had invited to witness Pakistan’s first underground nuclear tests on May 28, 1998, and to learn how to enrich uranium for a DPRK bomb, the Pakistani officials said. A Pakistani official said his country’s intelligence agents suspected that the US was using Kim as a mole inside the DPRK delegation, but that her actions were uncovered by Pakistani and DPRK agents. An Indian official who is familiar with his government’s assessment of the killing said bluntly: “She was in fact killed by the North Koreans on the grounds that she was in touch with certain Western diplomats.”

10. Inter-Korean Economic Talks

Yonhap (“KOREAS TO RESUME ECONOMIC TALKS 2-5 MARCH,” 03/03/04) reported that the DPRK and the ROK will hold a new round of economic talks on March 2-5 to discuss pending economic cooperation issues, including connection of severed railway and road links and construction of an industrial complex in the northern city of Kaesong, officials said Monday. The DPRK delegation led by Choe Yong-gon, vice minister of construction material and industry, will arrive here via Beijing Tuesday afternoon. The delegates are to sit down for talks with their southern counterparts, led by Vice Finance and Economy Minister Kim Kwang-nim and are scheduled to tour the LG Science Exhibition in Yeouido, Seoul. This week’s talks will be the eighth round of bilateral economic negotiations. At a late February working-level meeting in Kaesong, the ROK and the DPRK signed an agreement on the South’s provision of materials for the reconnection of railroads and roads as well as adopted a joint statement on maritime cooperation. The agreement stipulated provision of maintenance service for the railroads, the establishment of an asphalt factory and the provision of materials for reconnection of the railroads. Negotiators agreed to discuss the establishment of an office for the railroads and their operation in the next meeting. The Koreas also adopted a statement that they will decide the timing and venue for their next maritime talks via an exchange of documents. 11. ROK-US Relations

Associated Press (Sang-hun Choe, “ROK PRESIDENT CALLS FOR LESS RELIANCE ON US,” Seoul, 03/01/04) reported that ROK President Roh Moo-hyun called Monday for a foreign policy more independent of the US and criticized Japan for its militaristic past, targeting his country’s two biggest allies in the DPRK nuclear crisis. Giving a nationally televised address marking Korea’s March 1, 1919, uprising against Japanese colonial rule, Roh dismissed criticism that his foreign policy has fueled anti-Americanism among young South Koreans. “Let’s not talk about whether we are pro-American or anti-American,” Roh said to rousing applause. “Whether we are pro-US or anti-US cannot be the yardstick to assess ourselves.” “Step by step, we should strengthen our independence and build our strength as an independent nation.” Roh hailed a recent US-ROK agreement to pull US troops out of the Yongsan district of central Seoul, reminding people that Yongsan has been occupied by foreign forces for more than a century and calling the area “a symbol of foreign intervention, invasion and dependence.” The 7,000 US troops and family members there are scheduled to move to bases further south by 2006.

12. PRC Response to US Human Rights Report

Agence France-Presse (“CHINA SLAMS US HUMAN RIGHTS RECORD, CITES WAR IN IRAQ, AFGHANISTAN,” 03/01/04) reported that the PRC has published a scathing attack on the human rights situation in the US, retaliating for a similar report issued by Washington last week that accused Beijing of backsliding on its rights record. Only days after slamming the US report as “interference in its internal affairs,” the State Council, the PRC’s cabinet, countered with its own criticism. Allegations of US atrocities in the wars on Iraq and Afghanistan led the way. “In recent years, the US has practiced unilateralism on the international stage, wantonly engaged in military adventures, violently invaded the sovereignty of other nations and left the mark of rights violations everywhere,” the 2003 US Rights Violation Record said. “Since the US initiated the war on Iraq, 16,000 Iraqis have been killed including 10,000 citizens,” the report said. With a 400 billion dollar defense budget, US defense spending is bigger than military expenditures of the rest of the world combined, while the US is the world’s biggest seller of arms. It was responsible for more than 48 percent of all conventional weapons sales to the developing world in 2002, the report said. Rights violations were not only restricted to the 364,000 soldiers the US has based in more than 130 countries, the report said, but also occurred at home where the US remains one of the world’s most violent places to live. “The US leads the world in gun ownership, guns are everywhere and crimes involving guns are on the rise,” it said. The report also soundly blasted the US Patriot Act which has empowered the government to violate the rights and freedom of ordinary citizens, most notably American minorities, “in the name of national security and fighting terrorism,” it said.

13. US Role in Cross-Straits Relations

Agence France-Presse (“US WILLING TO PLAY ROLE IN NEW TAIWAN-CHINA TALKS,” 03/01/04) reported that the US has offered to smooth Taiwan’s relations with the PRC after the two sides in the island’s presidential race pledged to start talks with its rival. The US would be “all too happy” to help in bringing together the two sides for talks, the Financial Times reported quoting a senior official in Taipei. President Chen Shui-bian, of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), is fighting for re-election on March 20 in a close battle with Lien Chan, the chairman of the nationalist Kuomintang (KMT). Under pressure from Taiwan’s business community, both sides want to repair direct trade links across the Taiwan Strait that have been broken for decades.

14. Cross-Straits Relations

Agence France-Presse (“MILLIONS JOIN ANTI-CHINA PROTEST IN TAIWAN: ORGANISERS,” 02/28/04) reported that more than 2.5 million people joined hands to form a 500-kilometre (310-mile) human chain stretching the length of Taiwan in a huge anti-China protest ahead of the island’s presidential elections next month, according to organizers. The high turnout for the government-backed protest highlighting the threat posed to the island from PRC missiles was likely to boost the re-election chances of President Chen Shui-bian, analysts said. There was no independent confirmation of the figures but the opposition Kuomintang (KMT) disputed the size of the turnout. The show of strength was designed to galvanize Chen’s supporters before the March 20 ballot, with polls showing him lagging behind his sole challenger, Lien Chan of the KMT. “This is a historic event crossing ethnic, geographic, partisan, gender and age boundaries. There is no minority or majority in Taiwan. Taiwan is an integral,” he said. “Let us hold our hands, a simple but warm act, to tell the world and all people who care about Taiwan that ‘we love Taiwan and want peace’.” The protest, running from Keelung in the north to Pingtung in the south of the island, was called on the anniversary of February 28, 1947 when thousands of native Taiwanese were killed by KMT troops from the mainland in a bloody riot against the new rulers of the PRC.

15. ROK-Japan Relations

Agence France-Presse (“OK LEADER URGES TOKYO TO STOP PROVOKING ANTI-JAPANESE SENTIMENT,” 03/01/04) reported that ROK President Roh Moo-Hyun has urged Japan’s leaders to stop stirring anti-Japanese sentiment in comments taken as a reference to visits by Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to a controversial war shrine. “A national leader should not behave like reckless members of the public or politicians who are driven to gain popularity,” Roh said in a speech marking the anniversary of a bloody uprising in 1919 against Japan’s colonial rule. The remarks were seen here as Roh’s strongest criticism yet of Koizumi’s trips to the Yasukuni Shrine honoring Japan’s war dead including convicted war criminals. The memory of Japan’s harsh colonial rule from 1910-45 is still vivid here, Roh said, adding the two countries should refrain from deepening the wounds. “(Japanese leaders) should not think that every problem has been solved just because Korean leaders do not bother to point out unresolved historical problems with regards to Japan’s law and system,” Roh said. “We have to think about how to lead a new order in Northeast Asia in a calm and cool way.” Since taking office in 2001, Koizumi has made four visits to the shrine.

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