ASIAN ENERGY SECURITY NETWORK DAILY REPORT, Tuesday, July 13, 2004

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Tuesday, July 13, 2004

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1. DPRK Energy

The Nautilus Institute (DPRK Delegation, “Options For Rehabilitation of Energy System & Energy Security & Energy Planning in DPR of Korea, May 11 – 14, 2004) released this paper prepared for the Asian Energy Security workshop in Beijing, China in May 2004. The report states, “The most important task for the sustainable development of the economy is to realize the rehabilitation of existing energy systems and to ensure its long-term safety in the DPRK.” The overall objective of the energy sector – an increase in production of domestic resources with improved demand side management and environmental sustainability – is subject to a lack of funding and technology. Policy priorities focus on the establishment of “an efficient, stable and sustainable system.”

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2. Tools for Low Carbon Modeling in China

The Nautilus Institute (CHEN Changhong, WANG Bingyan, ZHAO Jing, DAI Yi, “Low Carbon Development and Emission Scenario in Shanghai, China – Using LEAP as an Integrated Energy and Environmental Model”, May 12th-14th, Beijing, China) released this study prepared by Shanghai Academy of Environmental Sciences for the Asian Energy Security Workshop in Beijing, China in May 2004. This paper reviews the current state of Shanghai’s energy sector and examines the benefits of low carbon policy development to reduce energy supply pressures, air pollutants and improve ambient air quality. The study includes the use of Long Range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) software to model different energy pathways and scenarios. Finally advance policy recommendations are presented for energy environment change in Shanghai.

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3. International Symposium on North East Asia Electrical System Ties

The Korea Electro technology Research Institute (KERI News, May 24, 2004) held the 1st International Symposium on the North East Asia Electrical System Ties (NEAREST) jointly organized by International Energy Agency (IEA), Asia Pacific Energy Research Center (APERC), and VOSTOKENERGO from May 18-19, 2004 in Seoul, Korea. International experts presented papers detailing experience from existing multi-national interconnections and examining feasibility, costs, and impacts of interconnections in Northeast Asia.

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4. Symposium on Climate and Extreme Events in Asia Pacific

East West Center, Asian Disaster Preparedness Center, and the Pacific Science Association convened the Symposium on Climate and Extreme Events in Asia Pacific (Eileen L. Shea, A.R. Subbiah, “Enhancing Resilience and Improving Decision Making’, MONTH? 2004). The Symposium was sponsored by NOAA/OGP, UNDP-BCPR, EWC, and ADPC/ECE (with funding from NOAA/OGP and the U.S. Agency for International Development, Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance). Individual presentations, working groups, and plenary discussions addressed five integrating themes: communication and information dissemination and gaps; participation among relevant stakeholders; climate information use to support decision-making; institutional capacity and barriers; and scientific and technical issues.

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5. Energy Security in North East Asia

The Washington Post (Paul Roberts, “The Undeclared Oil War”, June 28, 2004) reported on the diplomatic battle between China and Japan over access to Siberia’s oil fields. Both countries are vying for Russian oil transport through pipelines in an effort to improve national energy security. The article states that increasing demand for oil and lagging global oil production “will not only drive up the risk of conflict but will make it harder for governments to focus on long-term energy challenges…. that are critical to long-term energy security.”

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6. KEEI Quarterly Energy Outlook

Korean Energy Economics Institute (Nam-Yll Kim, Hojeong Park, Tae Heon Kim, Do Young Choi Energy Modeling Group, “Quarterly Energy Outlook, 1 Quarter 2004”, May 24, 2004) released it’s first quarter energy Outlook report for 2004. The report recognizes the expected growth of energy demand in 2004 while emphasizing the possible effects that uncertainty in the international oil market will have on this demand. Included are primary and final energy trends and forecasts and policy recommendations.

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7. Small Hybrid Solar-Wind Energy Systems

Department of Energy Pulse (DOE Pulse Staff, “Small Hybrid Solar and Wind Energy Systems Offer Alternatives,” May 31, 2004) reports” in many climates, solar and wind have seasonal variations and these variations often complement one another when it comes to power generation. Thus, a national lab is developing hybrid solar-wind systems for the estimated two billion people around the globe who are without electricity and who are unlikely to be connected to a grid because of the prohibitive expense. The National Renewables Energy Laboratory has established the International Systems Testing program and a website to report on the progress of the projects developed under the program.” See the website, which includes a link to real-time data collection at a well-illustrated system, at here.

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