APSNet Semi-Weekly Bulletin, October 16, 2006

Recommended Citation

"APSNet Semi-Weekly Bulletin, October 16, 2006", APSNet Semi-Weekly Bulletin, October 16, 2006, http://nautilus.org/apsnet/apsnet-for-20061016/

APSNet for 20061016

Austral Peace and Security Network (APSNet)

Twice weekly report from the Nautilus Institute at RMIT, Australia.

Monday 16 October 2006

  1. Iraq Has Boosted Terrorists – Cosgrove Turnaround
  2. PNG Leader Told: You’re Not Welcome
  3. SAS Terror Hunt Risks Manila Pact
  4. Another Activist Cleric Is Killed in Philippines
  5. Australia, Indonesia and the World: Public Opinion and Foreign Policy
  6. Briefing Note: Government Reponses to Citizen Claims of Rendition and Torture
  1. Iraq Has Boosted Terrorists – Cosgrove Turnaround, Paul Malone, Canberra Times, 2006-10-16

    Former Defence Force chief General Peter Cosgrove has added his voice to those acknowledging that the Iraq war has boosted global terrorism. General Cosgrove said, “If people say that there has been an energising of the jihadist movement through the protracted war in Iraq – well that’s pretty obvious”. This is in sharp contrast to the position he took after the 2004 Madrid train bombings.

  2. PNG Leader Told: You’re Not Welcome, David Humphries and Craig Skehan, SMH, 2006-10-16

    Australia’s relationship with PNG has hit rock bottom, with Canberra suspending ministerial ties while PNG explains the escape of a fugitive from Australian justice.

  3. SAS Terror Hunt Risks Manila Pact, Emma-Kate Symons, Australian, 2006-10-16

    Ratification of a defence treaty [Status of Forces Agreement] that would increase counter-terrorism co-operation between Australia and the Philippines has been further jeopardised by the embarrassing revelation that [an elite team of 20] SAS soldiers have been “illegally” hunting down terrorists in the southern Philippines.

  4. Another Activist Cleric Is Killed in Philippines, Carlos H. Conde, IHT, 2006-10-09

    Less than a week after a bishop from one of the Philippines’ largest Protestant churches was murdered, another priest from the same religious order has been killed in what is believed to be part of an ongoing campaign against social activists. A number of human rights groups have accused the Arroyo government of backing the campaign against the activists.

  5. Australia, Indonesia and the World: Public Opinion and Foreign Policy, Ivan Cook, Lowy Institute Poll, October 2006 [1.2 MByte PDF]

    This report is based on national public opinion surveys conducted simultaneously in Australia and Indonesia between 19 June and 6 July 2006. It contains responses from both countries to questions on foreign and security policy, global affairs.

     

  6. Briefing Note: Government Reponses to Citizen Claims of Rendition and Torture

    On 26 September 2002 Canadian, Maher Arar, was detained in New York by US officials, acting upon information supplied by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Despite carrying a Canadian passport, he was deported to Syria in accordance with a U.S. policy, “extraordinary rendition”. Arar was held in solitary confinement in a Syrian prison until his release in October 2003. A Canadian Commission of Inquiry confirmed Arar’s claims of torture and that there was never any evidence linking Arar to extremist or criminal groups. The Canadian parliament issued a unanimous apology to Arar, and Prime Minister Stephen Harper made a direct formal protest to President George Bush by telephone on 6 October 2006. The case exemplifies differences in approach to the rights of citizens claiming to be victims of illegal torture and rendition taken by different governments.

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