Special Reports

Special Reports are longer, often more technical, documents consisting of entire articles, government statements, and other documents relevant to security and peace in Northeast Asia.

NAPSNet, Special Reports

An Ecological Framework for Promoting Inter-Korean Cooperation and Nuclear Free Future: a DMZ Peace Park

Hayes and Cavazos suggest that a DMZ Peace Park could be a valuable and attractive element of inter-Korean cooperation, and one that is gaining traction under President Park’s “trustpolitik”.  The authors suggest that it is essential to embed the narrower concept of a DMZ-only peace park in a regional approach to creating a biodiversity corridor—partly because biodiversity conservation requires this networked approach; and partly because an approach that involves six or seven countries  is more likely to succeed over time than a solely inter-Korean endeavor.

Peter Hayes is Professor of International Relations, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Australia and Director, Nautilus Institute.

Roger Cavazos is a Nautilus Institute Associate and retired US military intelligence officer.

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Thoughts on China’s National Interests

[IN CHINESE] Zhang Tuosheng discusses China’s national interests, especially China’s core interests as articulated in the 2011 “China’s Peaceful Development” White Paper and how China might better safeguard those interests through strengthening China’s policy options and orientation.
Zhang Tuosheng is the Director of Research and Senior Fellow at the China Foundation for International and Strategic Studies (CFISS) and also the director of CFISS Academic Committee.

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Challenges, Opportunities and Strategies

This is the second in a three part series of articles from Professor Zhang Tuosheng of the China Foundation for International Strategic Studies in Beijing, China. The general progression of this series is: 1) suggestions for constructing a new type of great power relationship (between the U.S. and China); 2) identifying challenges, opportunities and strategies in the basic security environment surrounding China as perceived by a Chinese strategist; culminating in 3) thoughts on China’s national interests providing context and identifying common ground for future discussions.

In this Policy Forum, Zhang Tuosheng suggests there have been some major changes from China’s view point in the international and domestic environment from 2008-2012.   The challenges to China’s security environment reached a high point  in 2012.  The relationship between China and the outside world has entered a period of heightened friction. However, this should not shake the basic judgment that this is China’s period of strategic opportunities.  China’s rise will continue thanks to three fundamentally unchanged factors: favorable changes in the international situation, reform and opening up and sticking to the path of peaceful development. To turn challenges into opportunities, the author proposes adhering to effective, peaceful foreign policy and precisely defined core interests, in order to build new relations among major powers such as the three major breakthrough, strengthen high-level decision-making mechanisms for policy coordination, strategic planning and enhance crisis management   He also makes nine specific policy recommendations.

Zhang Tuosheng is the Director of Research and Senior Fellow at the China Foundation for International and Strategic Studies (CFISS) and also the director of CFISS Academic Committee.

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Deep Borehole Disposal of Spent Fuel and Other Radioactive Wastes

This report by Neil Chapman “provides a review of the status of international research and policy on the use of very deep boreholes (several kilometres in depth) for the disposal of radioactive wastes.” While reviewing numerous studies on deep borehole disposal of spent fuel, HLW and other radioactive wastes, Chapman finds that “a key gap continues to be a comprehensive operational and post-closure safety assessment of DBD.” He also finds that “the lack of full-scale trials of certain aspects of the technology (not necessarily at envisaged disposal depths) is holding up further development.”

Professor Neil Chapman is a senior scientist with 35 years’ experience in the scientific and strategic aspects of deep and shallow disposal of radioactive wastes, including provision of advice at the highest level to industrial and governmental organisations.

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How To Construct A New U.S.-China Great Power Relationship

[IN CHINESE] Zhang Tuosheng discusses China’s national interests, especially China’s core interests as articulated in the 2011 “China’s Peaceful Development” White Paper and how China might better safeguard those interests through strengthening China’s policy options and orientation.
This is the first in a three part series of articles from Professor Zhang Tuosheng of the China Foundation for International Strategic Studies in Beijing, China. The general progression of this series is: 1) suggestions for constructing a new type of great power relationship (between the U.S. and China); 2) identifying challenges, opportunities and strategies in the basic security environment surrounding China as perceived by a Chinese strategist; culminating in 3) thoughts on China’s national interests to provide context and identifying common ground for future discussions.

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Green Shoot: Abenomics and the 3rd Arrow

This article describes the impressive, resilience-targeted greening of Japan, evident in nationwide deployments of renewable energy, radical efficiency, and other core aspects of sustainability. These developments are already underway, and include public- and private-sector actors as well as community groups. The greening also has promising stamina due to being increasingly deeply inscribed in the fiscal, regulatory and other mechanisms of a rapidly emergent industrial policy.

Andrew DeWit is Professor in the School of Policy Studies at Rikkyo University and an Asia-Pacific Journal coordinator. With Iida Tetsunari and Kaneko Masaru, he is coauthor of “Fukushima and the Political Economy of Power Policy in Japan,” in Jeff Kingston (ed.) Natural Disaster and Nuclear Crisis in Japan.

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网络空间安全威胁与对策思考

[Chinese Version] In this Special Report Senior Colonel (Retired) Fan Gaoyue argues that the internet and cyberspace in broad terms have an openness and ability to transcend geopolitical borders that makes it vulnerable. Therefore there are several practical measures for international cooperation that can promote cyberspace security.
Fan Gaoyue recently retired from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. His most recent assignment was at the Chinese Academy of Military Sciences. He was also a WSD-Handa Fellow at PACFORUM CSIS (Center for Strategic and International Studies) in 2011.

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Threats to Cyberspace and Responses

[English Version] In this Special Report Senior Colonel (Retired) Fan Gaoyue argues that the internet and cyberspace in broad terms have an openness and ability to transcend geopolitical borders that makes it vulnerable. Therefore there are several practical measures for international cooperation that can promote cyberspace security.
Fan Gaoyue recently retired from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. His most recent assignment was at the Chinese Academy of Military Sciences. He was also a WSD-Handa Fellow at PACFORUM CSIS (Center for Strategic and International Studies) in 2011.

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Update Review of Safety Aspects of Nuclear Power Program in the Republic of Korea

Recent probes have unveiled irregularities involving a parts supplier to Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., the state-run operator of the nation’s nuclear plants. Products were certified for use despite failing to meet quality standards and the revelation led to four nuclear reactors being shut down.

Concerns about the safety of South Korea’s nuclear plants have been long-standing, as the following report, prepared for the World Bank and UNDP in April of 1982, outlines. The findings of the 1982 review of the ROK’s regulatory aspects and operational safety of nuclear power plants were concerning, with the principal conclusions stating that it is “essential and urgent that there exist in the Republic of Korea a strong, independent and competent nuclear regulatory function as well as associated Korean safety laws, regulation, criteria, codes and standards.” It further state that “it is important to recognize that, by contrast to oil and coal power plants, operating nuclear power plants require continued upgrading in personnel training, equipment, and operational safety bases…”

This report was obtained by the Nautilus Institute under the Freedom of Information Act. Please click here to view other documents obtained through FOIA. 

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An Emerging Fukushima Model?

Andrew Dewit discusses Japan’s plans to build the world’s largest offshore wind farm near Fukushima as part of plans to reconstruct the area stricken by nuclear disaster in 2011. He writes “that if one looks closely at Fukushima, as well as Japan’s subnational governments in general, one finds plenty of political will and concrete action. This comes as something of a surprise, to be frank, as the general narrative on Japan and its power holders has been that the dominance of the nuclear-favouring Abe regime means the decline of the pro-renewable and anti-nuclear movement spawned by Fukushima. The evidence suggests, however, that Japanese power policy and politics is becoming decentralized and distributed.”

Andrew Dewit is Professor in the School of Policy Studies at Rikkyo University and an Asia-Pacific Journal coordinator.

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